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         Thursday, May 26, 2016

One Year Ago

Livestock producers had 17 per cent of the hay crop cut and eight per cent baled or put into silage. Heavy rain fell in many areas, damaging some crops.

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Warm weather in much of the province has helped with crop development and haying.  Livestock producers now have six per cent of the hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Many producers on the east side of the province continue to deal with localized flooding and saturated fields.  Although weather conditions have improved, many crops in these regions have been significantly affected by the excess moisture.  Early estimates suggest that between two million to three million acres have been flooded and are unlikely to produce a crop.

Topsoil moisture conditions are improving for many areas.  Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 34 per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate, three per cent short and one per cent very short.

The majority of fall cereals are in the shotblade to dough stages of crop development, while most spring cereals are in the tillering to shotblade stages.  The majority of pulse crops are in the vegetative to flowering stages and flax crops are mostly in the seedling to flowering crop stages.  Most canola and mustard crops are in the seedling to flowering stages of development.

Crop damage this week is attributed to excess moisture, localized flooding, hail, wind and insects such as the cabbage seedpod weevil.  Root rots and leaf spot diseases have also caused some damage.  There is adequate water available for livestock, and pasture conditions are rated as 27 per cent excellent, 62 per cent good, 10 per cent fair and one per cent poor.

Farmers are busy controlling pests and haying.




Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

Producers in the southeast continue to deal with excess moisture and localized flooding. Many areas of the region received heavy rain that has further set back crop development. Crops that remain in saturated fields are yellowing, and warm and dry conditions are needed soon to help alleviate stress. Many fields, roads and yards continue to be inaccessible due to excess moisture.

The Moose Jaw area received the greatest amount of precipitation for the week (45 mm), while the Moosomin area has received 535 mm since April 1, the greatest amount for both the region and the province. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions have improved and are now rated as 50 per cent surplus and 50 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture land topsoil moisture is rated as 34 per cent surplus and 66 per cent adequate.

Livestock producers have six per cent of the hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 24 per cent excellent, 59 per cent good, 12 per cent fair and five per cent poor. Pasture conditions are rated as 27 per cent excellent, 61 per cent good and 12 per cent fair. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

The majority of crop damage this week was due to localized flooding and wind, but additional damage was caused by insects such as alfalfa weevils and cutworms and from root rot and various leaf diseases. There are reports of golfball-sized hail in some areas that has damaged some crops. In-crop spraying for weeds and diseases continues as field conditions allow.

Farmers are busy cleaning up flooding damage, controlling weeds and haying.




Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Ten per cent of the hay crop has been cut and two per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 10 per cent excellent, 81 per cent good and nine per cent fair. Crop reporters rate pasture conditions as 20 per cent excellent, 70 per cent good, nine per cent fair and one per cent poor. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

Rainfall this week ranged from trace amounts to 12 mm in the Shaunavon area. The Limerick area has received the region's greatest amount of rain since April 1  (308 mm). Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as three per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate, seven per cent short and three per cent very short.

Crop damage this week is attributed to localized flooding, drought and insects such as cabbage seedpod weevils. Root rots and leaf diseases have also caused some damage in the region. Spraying for weeds, diseases and insects continues as field conditions allow. Crop and hay development has been slow but recent warm weather is helping with growth.

Farmers are busy haying, controlling pests and hauling grain.




East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

Flooded fields, roads and yards continue to affect producers in the east-central region. Many crops are yellowing under severe excess moisture stress. Warm and dry conditions are needed soon.

The Quill Lake area received the most rainfall this week (24 mm) while the Foam lake area is reporting the greatest amount since April 1  (499 mm). Topsoil moisture conditions are improving and are now rated as 68 per cent surplus and 32 per cent adequate on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 60 per cent surplus and 40 per cent adequate.

Due to cool and wet growing conditions, less than one per cent of the hay crop has been cut. Hay quality is rated as 13 per cent excellent, 76 per cent good, five per cent fair and six per cent poor. Pasture conditions are rated as 29 per cent excellent, 60 per cent good, seven per cent fair and four per cent poor. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

In addition to excess moisture and localized flooding, crop damage has also been caused by wind, insects and diseases such as root rot and leaf spots. A storm moved through the area over the weekend, bringing baseball-sized hail and heavy rain that damaged many crops, houses and vehicles. In-crop spraying continues as field conditions allow and many producers have hired aerial applicators to help them spray saturated fields.

Farmers are busy cleaning up flooding damage, controlling weeds and getting ready for haying.




West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Six per cent of the hay crop has been cut and less than one per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 89 per cent good and 11 per cent fair; yields are not expected to be as high as normal in many areas. Crop reporters rate pasture conditions as 44 per cent excellent, 49 per cent good and seven per cent fair. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

Rainfall in the region ranged from small amounts to 35 mm in the Landis area. The Sonningdale area continues to lead the region in total rainfall, having received 287 mm of rain since April 1. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 94 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.

Localized flooding, wind, insects and diseases such as root rots are causing the majority of damage this week. Spraying continues and many producers are now spraying fungicides in some fields. A storm went through the area bringing baseball-sized hail and high winds. There are reports of several tornadoes touching down and damaging fields and yards.

Farmers are busy haying, controlling pests and hauling grain.




Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Much of the region received rainfall this past week that has delayed crop development and spraying operations for many producers. At this time, two per cent of the hay crop has been cut and less than one per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 100 per cent good while pasture conditions are rated as 20 per cent excellent, 61 per cent good, 16 per cent fair, two per cent poor and one per cent very poor. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

The Birch Hills area received 25 mm of rain this past week while the Lake Lenore area has received 330 mm of rain since April 1. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are slowly improving and are now rated as 67 per cent surplus and 33 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 84 per cent surplus and 16 per cent adequate. The recent rainfall over the past few weeks has flooded yards, roads and fields, many of which are not still accessible at this time.

Sources of crop damage this week include localized flooding, hail, wind, insects and diseases. Many producers are wrapping up in-crop herbicide spraying but will soon be applying fungicides. Overall, crops are behind normal development and will need some warm and dry weather to help them advance.

Farmers are busy controlling pests, hauling grain and haying.




Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Eight per cent of the hay crop has now been cut and less than one per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 22 per cent excellent and 78 per cent good. Pasture conditions at this time are rated as 28 per cent excellent, 70 per cent good and two per cent fair. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

Rainfall this week ranged from trace amounts to 35 mm in the Neilburg area. Since April 1, the Hafford area has received 344 mm of rain. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are now rated as six per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and five per cent short, while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as six per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and two per cent short. For some producers in the region, rainfall would be welcomed, while for others warm and dry weather is needed to help crops advance.

Localized flooding and diseases have caused the majority of crop damage this week. Many producers are finishing up herbicide applications and will soon be spraying fungicides. Overall, conditions are good and crop development is progressing.

Farmers are busy controlling pests and haying.





CROP STAGING TABLES

Fall Cereals

Jointed

Shot blade

Heading

Dough

 

July 10 Prov. Avg.

3

22

64

11

 

Southeast

2

21

77

0

 

Southwest

0

13

57

30

 

East central

6

29

62

3

 

West central

0

25

63

12

 

Northeast

0

14

86

0

 

Northwest

12

13

49

26

 

Spring Cereals

Emerge

Tillering

Jointed 

Shotblade

Heading

July 10 Prov. Avg.

5

29

37

24

5

Southeast

7

34

36

18

5

Southwest

1

21

38

34

6

East central

13

37

29

18

3

West central

2

31

38

25

4

Northeast

1

27

45

25

2

Northwest

2

21

39

24

14

Flax

Pre-emerge

Emerge

Seedling

Stem Extension

Flowering

July 10 Prov. Avg.

1

10

49

38

2

Southeast

1

13

57

28

1

Southwest

0

8

39

48

5

East central

2

10

46

42

0

West central

0

5

33

59

3

Northeast

0

1

34

65

0

Northwest

0

2

42

56

0

Canola & Mustard

Emerge

Seedling

Rosette

Flowering

Podding

July 10 Prov. Avg.

2

20

44

33

1

Southeast

5

21

38

36

0

Southwest

0

6

33

60

1

East central

3

28

43

26

0

West central

0

12

50

37

1

Northeast

4

27

49

20

0

Northwest

1

11

54

34

0

Pulse Crops

Emerge

Vegetative

Flowering

Podded

 

July 10 Prov. Avg.

4

64

31

1

 

Southeast

13

67

20

0

 

Southwest

3

57

40

0

 

East central

4

68

27

1

 

West central

1

72

26

1

 

Northeast

7

89

4

0

 

Northwest

1

53

46

0

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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