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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

One Year Ago
Livestock producers had 29 per cent of the hay crop cut and 27 per cent baled or put into silage.
The majority of crops were at normal stages of development.

Follow the 2014 Crop Report on Twitter @SKAgriculture

SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

1

49

50

Spring Cereals

1

42

57

Oilseeds

1

38

61

Pulse Crops

0

54

46

Warm and relatively dry weather continues to help advance haying progress and crop development in many areas. Livestock producers now have 25 per cent of the 2014 hay crop cut and 15 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. Seventeen per cent is rated as excellent in quality, 74 per cent good, eight per cent fair and one per cent poor.

Recent warm weather has helped many crops recover from flooding stress, but some areas continue to deal with excess moisture. The majority of crops are in fair to excellent condition, but many are behind normal developmental stages. Fifty per cent of the fall cereals, 57 per cent of the spring cereals and 61 per cent of the oilseeds are behind normal stages of development, while 54 per cent of pulses are at normal stages of development for this time of year. 

Rainfall this week ranged from trace amounts to 65 mm in the Moosomin area; however, there are some reports of even more rainfall in that area. Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve in many areas, although other areas will soon need moisture to help crops advance. Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 17 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and two per cent very short.  

Localized flooding, hail and wind have caused the most crop damage this past week. Many producers are reporting damage from cutworms, wheat midge and grasshoppers and from diseases such as leaf spots and root rots. 

Farmers are busy haying and controlling diseases and insects.

 



Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

SE SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

1

35

64

Spring Cereals

0

26

74

Oilseeds

0

27

73

Pulse Crops

0

28

72

Livestock producers in the southeast now have 19 per cent of the hay crop cut and 14 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 12 per cent excellent, 73 per cent good, 11 per cent fair and four per cent poor.

Warm and relatively dry weather in most of the region allowed many producers to return to the field. Many crops are recovering from the recent flooding, but some remain under water. Where flooding damage was severe, plants are yellowing and diseases such as root rot are becoming prevalent in many fields. Fields that have not been able to recover are not expected to produce a crop.

A storm moved through the Moosomin area, bringing high winds, hail and heavy rain of 65 mm or more in some parts of the area; many fields, yards and homes were once again flooded. The Moosomin area has recorded the greatest amount of rainfall since April 1 for both the region and the province (600 mm). Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve for many producers and are rated as 23 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and six per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Some areas of the region that did not receive excess moisture will need rain soon to help crops advance.

Most crops in the region are behind their normal developmental stages. Quality ranges from poor to excellent, depending on how much moisture has been received this year. Besides localized flooding, additional causes of damage this week were hail and wind. Although the heat has been welcomed for crop advancement, it has also damaged some flowering crops, such as canola, with heat blasting. Producers are spraying for fusarium head blight and leaf spot diseases in cereals, sclerotinia in canola and leaf spot diseases in pulses. There have been reports of grasshoppers, cutworms, wheat midge and diamondback worms in many fields.

Farmers are busy haying and spraying for diseases and insects.

 


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

SW SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

0

78

22

Spring Cereals

0

60

40

Oilseeds

0

54

46

Pulse Crops

0

63

37

Haying is quickly advancing in the region as livestock producers now have 30 per cent of the hay crop cut and 24 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 17 per cent excellent, 77 per cent good and six per cent fair.

Very little rain was received in the region: the Big Beaver area reported 4 mm and the Fife Lake area reported 3 mm. Since April 1, the Cadillac area has received the greatest amount of rain (377 mm). Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as three per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate, 20 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 73 per cent adequate, 19 per cent short and eight per cent very short. Some areas of the region, particularly those near the Alberta and United States borders, are very short of topsoil moisture and a rain would be welcomed by many.

The majority of crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year, but a significant minority are still behind. While the recent warm weather has been beneficial to crop advancement, some flowering crops, such as canola, have been damaged by heat blasting. Some producers are applying fungicides to crops for diseases such as leaf spots and sclerotinia, and others have been spraying for grasshoppers, wheat midge and cabbage seedpod weevils. Other sources of damage include hail, wind and drought.

Farmers are busy haying, controlling pests and hauling grain.

 


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

EC SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

2

36

62

Spring Cereals

0

27

73

Oilseeds

1

28

71

Pulse Crops

1

46

53

Nineteen per cent of the hay crop has now been cut and eight per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality at this time is rated as 25 per cent excellent, 62 per cent good and 13 per cent fair.

Much of the area had warm and relatively dry weather  this past week, although a severe storm brought high wind, rain and hail. Many crops are recovering from the recent flooding, but some remain under water. Severe flooding damage has yellowed many crops and root rot diseases are very common in the area. Fields that are struggling to recover are not expected to produce a crop.

The Elfros area received the most rain this past week (5 mm), while the Foam Lake area continues to lead the region with the most rainfall since April 1 (501 mm). Topsoil moisture conditions are improving and are now rated as 35 per cent surplus and 65 per cent adequate on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 28 per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate and three per cent short. While many areas remain saturated, other areas could use rain to help crops advance.

Most crops are behind their normal stages of development for this time of year and quality ranges from poor to excellent, depending on how much moisture has been received this season. Localized flooding, wind and hail have been responsible for the majority of crop damage this week. When conditions allow, producers are spraying fungicides for leaf spots and fusarium head blight in cereals, sclerotinia in canola and leaf spots in pulses. There are reports of wheat midge, grasshoppers and cutworms in some fields.

Farmers are busy haying and controlling diseases and insects.

 


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

 

WC SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

0

52

48

Spring Cereals

0

48

52

Oilseeds

1

52

47

Pulse Crops

0

59

41

Livestock producers now have 28 per cent of the hay crop cut and 21 per cent baled or put into silage. At this time, hay quality is rated as 17 per cent excellent, 79 per cent good and four per cent fair.

Some areas received small amounts of rain, with the Unity area reporting 10 mm. Since April 1, the Sonningdale area has received the greatest amount of precipitation for the area (289 mm). Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as four per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 16 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and 20 per cent short. Many producers in the region could use some rain to help crops advance.

The majority of crops are either behind or at their normal developmental stages for this time of year. Quality ranges from fair to excellent in condition. Crop damage was minimal this past week for most areas; however, there are reports of wheat midge and grasshopper damage and root rots. There are also reports of damage due to drought-like conditions and some heat blasting damage on canola. Many producers in the region are spraying for leaf spot diseases in cereals and pulses as well as for sclerotinia in canola.

Farmers are busy haying and controlling insects and diseases.

 


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

NE SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

1

58

41

Spring Cereals

4

43

53

Oilseeds

4

39

57

Pulse Crops

0

45

55

Despite the wet conditions in many areas, livestock producers have 21 per cent of the hay crop cut and 11 per cent baled or put into silage. At this time, hay quality is rated as nine per cent excellent, 82 per cent good and nine per cent fair.

Warm weather has helped to advance crops, but many are still behind their normal stages of development for this time of year. Depending on how much moisture has been received this year, crops conditions range from very poor to excellent. Many crops have recovered from the recent flooding, but some remain underwater. Crops are yellowing and root rot disease is common in many areas. Fields that are struggling to recover are not expected to produce a crop.

Small amounts of rain fell across the majority of the region, with the Arborfield area reporting 8 mm. Since April 1, the Lake Lenore area has received 330 mm of rain, the greatest amount for the region. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland continue to improve and are now rated as 33 per cent surplus, 66 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 57 per cent surplus and 43 per cent adequate.

Crop damage this week is attributed to localized flooding, wind, insects and diseases. There are reports of wheat midge and grasshoppers in some fields and producers are now spraying for leaf spot diseases in cereals and pulses as well as for sclerotinia in canola.

Farmers are busy haying and controlling pests.

 


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

NW SK Crop Development - July 14

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

0

60

40

Spring Cereals

0

52

48

Oilseeds

1

52

47

Pulse Crops

0

61

39

Thirty-two per cent of the hay crop has now been cut and 12 per cent has been baled or put into silage. At this time, hay quality is rated as 30 per cent excellent and 70 per cent good.

Much of the region received rainfall last week with the Meadow Lake and Rapid View areas reporting 20 mm. Since April 1, the Rapid View area has received the greatest amount of precipitation for the region at 283 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are now rated as 87 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short while hay and pasture land topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 91 per cent adequate and nine per cent short. For some in the region, rainfall would be welcomed while for others warm and dry weather is needed to help crops advance.

Many crops are either at or behind their normal developmental stages for this time of year while the majority are in poor to excellent condition. Conditions vary depending on rainfall received this year. Crop damage this week is due to localized flooding, wind and drought-like conditions in some areas. Producers have been spraying for diseases such as leaf spots in cereals and pulses and sclerotinia in canola.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and spraying for diseases and insects.

 


 

SK (Provincial) Crop Conditions - July 14, 2014 

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

8

16

17

22

13

17

17

% good

56

50

59

61

53

54

39

% fair

27

34

19

13

29

23

30

% poor

8

0

4

3

4

5

11

% very poor

1

0

1

1

1

1

3

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

7

13

20

4

27

21

10

% good

59

49

58

71

53

49

73

% fair

22

27

21

21

14

21

17

% poor

7

9

1

4

4

3

0

% very poor

5

2

0

0

2

6

0

Southeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

2

13

11

17

5

12

21

% good

50

75

65

49

57

60

17

% fair

31

12

17

21

30

21

35

% poor

16

0

5

8

6

4

19

% very poor

1

0

2

5

2

3

8

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

8

11

11

5

8

5

0

% good

54

51

69

67

45

24

0

% fair

18

27

15

24

26

39

100

% poor

10

7

2

4

9

7

0

% very poor

10

4

3

0

12

25

0

Southwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

11

20

23

29

17

22

14

% good

69

39

70

62

76

69

66

% fair

18

41

6

7

7

8

20

% poor

2

0

1

2

0

1

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

5

12

23

0

34

28

10

% good

81

72

57

93

53

59

80

% fair

13

15

19

7

11

12

10

% poor

1

1

1

0

2

1

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

East-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

13

14

7

11

4

6

9

% good

52

42

49

59

44

40

48

% fair

35

44

36

28

41

44

34

% poor

0

0

7

2

9

9

9

% very poor

0

0

1

0

2

1

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

2

4

12

0

16

14

40

% good

47

34

30

100

49

44

50

% fair

40

40

48

0

25

37

10

% poor

8

20

10

0

10

5

0

% very poor

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

West-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

7

5

25

12

23

24

24

% good

82

76

61

73

61

65

53

% fair

11

19

13

15

16

11

23

% poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

% very poor

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

19

25

18

0

30

25

50

% good

73

59

63

100

61

56

40

% fair

8

16

19

0

9

18

10

% poor

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Northeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

5

2

10

5

12

7

1

% good

21

57

54

48

52

46

46

% fair

38

27

29

32

32

33

27

% poor

27

11

6

10

3

11

24

% very poor

9

3

1

5

1

3

2

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

6

11

3

2

1

0

0

% good

58

47

40

62

41

42

0

% fair

31

25

34

26

19

15

0

% poor

3

10

15

8

29

6

0

% very poor

2

7

8

2

10

37

100

Northwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

3

5

32

N/A

33

39

1

% good

95

90

59

N/A

60

56

46

% fair

2

5

8

N/A

6

4

27

% poor

0

0

1

N/A

1

1

24

% very poor

0

0

0

N/A

0

0

2

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

30

34

N/A

N/A

33

N/A

N/A

% good

70

48

N/A

N/A

49

N/A

N/A

% fair

0

17

N/A

N/A

13

N/A

N/A

% poor

0

1

N/A

N/A

5

N/A

N/A

% very poor

0

0

N/A

N/A

0

N/A

N/A

 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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