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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One Year Ago

Livestock producers had 17 per cent of the hay crop cut and eight per cent baled or put into silage. Heavy rain fell in many areas, damaging some crops.

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Estimated Provincial Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.5

2.4

Brome/Alfalfa

1.4

2.2

Other Tame Hay

1.1

4.0

Wild Hay

1.0

1.8

Greenfeed

2.0

2.6

Harvest operations are just beginning in some areas of the province, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. Pulses are being desiccated and canola swathed. There has also been some combining of pulses and winter cereals in southern regions. Many crops are starting to turn and general harvest will begin in the coming weeks.  

Warm weather this past week has helped crop development; however, additional warm weather will be needed going into harvest as crops are 10 days to two weeks behind normal in many areas.

In some areas, swathed hay is drying too slowly, and livestock producers are facing other baling challenges. Haying progress varies, depending on rain showers. The estimated average dry land hay yields are reported as 1.5 tons per acre (alfalfa), 1.4 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome hay), 1.1 tons per acre (other tame hay), one ton per acre (wild hay) and two tons per acre (greenfeed). On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.4 tons per acre (alfalfa), 2.2 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome hay), four tons per acre (other tame hay), 1.8 tons per acre (wild hay) and 2.6 tons per acre (greenfeed). 

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to several inches in some southern and central regions. Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and one per cent very short.  

Storms moved through the province last week, damaging some crops with heavy rain, strong winds and large hail. Grasshoppers and lygus bugs are also causing some damage, as are leaf spot diseases and fusarium head blight.  

Farmers are busy finishing haying, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.
 



Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

Estimated Southeast Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.7

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

1.6

N/A

Other Tame Hay

1.2

N/A

Wild Hay

1.0

N/A

Greenfeed

1.9

N/A

Warm weather is helping to advance crops in the region, although many are behind normal development by as much as two weeks. There are reports of some canola being swathed and some pulses being desiccated. Some winter wheat and fall rye crops have been combined as well. Haying continues at a slower-than-normal pace, although many producers are indicating that haying will be done soon if warm and dry weather continues. Frequent showers and heavy dew in the morning have extended drying time and delayed baling.

Rainfall in the region varied from trace amounts to 92 mm in the Qu'Appelle area. Since April 1, the Moosomin area has recorded the highest cumulative rainfall for both the region and the province (642 mm). Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as five per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate, eight per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 17 per cent short. CD 2A is reporting that seven per cent of cropland acres are very short topsoil moisture, while CDs 1A and 3ASE are reporting that 30 per cent and 28 per cent, respectively, of hay and pasture acres are short topsoil moisture.  

A severe thunderstorm moved through parts of the region last Friday, bringing heavy rain and strong winds that lodged many crops in the area. There are reports of damaged homes and grain bins from plough winds, hail and localized flooding. Some producers are spraying flax crops for grasshoppers, while fusarium head blight is being found in some cereal fields. Farmers are busy finishing haying, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.

 



Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Estimated Southwest Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.3

1.9

Brome/Alfalfa

1.3

1.9

Other Tame Hay

1.0

N/A

Wild Hay

1.0

1.0

Greenfeed

1.7

N/A

Harvest is underway for some producers in the region as five per cent of the fall rye, four per cent of the field peas, two per cent of the winter wheat and one per cent of the lentils have been combined. Desiccation of pulse crops continues and canola swathing is just beginning. Haying continues between rain showers, with many producers hoping to finish soon. Rain showers and heavy dew in the morning have extended drying time and delayed baling.

Rainfall varied throughout the region, ranging from trace amounts to 83 mm in the Big Beaver area. The Vanguard area, with 356 mm of precipitation, has recorded the greatest amount of cumulative rainfall since April 1. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 89 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as 72 per cent adequate, 26 per cent short and two per cent very short. CD 4A is reporting that 30 per cent of cropland and 36 per cent of hay land and pasture are short topsoil moisture at this time.  

Strong winds, heavy rain and large hail have damaged many fields, homes and equipment. There are reports of severe hail damage around the Leader and Glenbain areas that have either lodged or wiped out crops. Producers continue to spray for grasshoppers in crops, although damage is mainly localized. Farmers are busy finishing haying and beginning harvest operations.

 



East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

Estimated East-central Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.5

2.0

Brome/Alfalfa

1.4

2.0

Other Tame Hay

1.3

N/A

Wild Hay

1.1

N/A

Greenfeed

2.0

2.0

Harvest operations will be getting underway shortly for many producers in the east-central region. Warm weather has helped to advance crops but the majority are at least a week or more behind normal development. There are reports of some pulse crops being desiccated and some fall rye crops being swathed. Livestock producers are trying to finish haying as weather permits but frequent rain and heavy dew are delaying dry-down and baling.

The region received varying amounts of rainfall this past week, with the Jansen area reporting the most at 64 mm. The Foam Lake area has recorded the region's greatest amount of rainfall (582 mm) since April 1. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as four per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and one per cent very short.

Heavy rain, strong winds and hail have damaged some crops in the region. There are some reports of producers spraying for grasshoppers in lentil and flax fields, although damage is minimal. Fusarium head blight is causing concerns for some as symptoms are now showing up in cereal fields. Farmers are busy trying to finish haying, hauling grain and bales and getting ready for harvest.

 



West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Estimated West-central Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.5

3.7

Brome/Alfalfa

1.3

3.5

Other Tame Hay

1.2

4.0

Wild Hay

1.1

2.7

Greenfeed

2.0

3.3

Desiccation of pulses is underway in much of the region and some producers will begin swathing canola soon. Crops are advancing quickly thanks to warm weather, although rain would be welcomed by many to help later-seeded crops fill and to replenish topsoil moisture. Haying is wrapping up for many producers despite the frequent rain that has delayed dry-down. There are some reports of hay rotting in the swath due to excess moisture and hail damage.

The Macklin area received the greatest amount of rainfall this past week (76 mm), while the Major area leads the region with the greatest cumulative rainfall amount since April 1 (384 mm). Recent rain showers and high humidity are delaying haying and swath dry-down for many producers in the region. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 13 per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate, six per cent short and four per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 12 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 12 per cent short and three per cent very short. CD 6B is reporting that 10 per cent of cropland acres and seven per cent of hay and pasture acres are very short topsoil moisture at this time.   

Like much of the province, heavy rain and strong winds have lodged crops and flooded fields. There are reports of higher than normal disease levels in pulse and canola crops. Farmers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales and grain, and getting ready for harvest.

 



Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Estimated Northeast Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.5

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

1.2

N/A

Other Tame Hay

1.1

N/A

Wild Hay

1.1

N/A

Greenfeed

N/A

N/A

Crops are advancing quickly thanks to warm weather. Desiccation and swathing operations will begin in the next few weeks on earlier-seeded crops. Despite the recent rain and wet fields, many producers would welcome a rain to help replenish topsoil moisture and help crops fill. Haying is wrapping up in the region and producers are hauling bales home.

Small amounts of rain fell on most of the region this past week. The Kinistino area received 20 mm, while the Star City area has recorded the highest cumulative precipitation since April 1 (396 mm). Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as two per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and two per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and 14 per cent short.

There are reports of higher-than-normal disease levels in some fields as fusarium head blight and sclerotinia are now being noted. Strong winds this past week lodged many crops but damage is minimal so far. Farmers are finishing haying and getting ready for harvest.

 



Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Estimated Northwest Hay Yields (tons/acre) - August 11, 2014

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.8

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

1.6

N/A

Other Tame Hay

1.2

N/A

Wild Hay

1.0

N/A

Greenfeed

2.2

N/A

Crops are slowly advancing in the northwestern region, although the majority are at least a week or more behind normal development. Some producers have started desiccating pulses and swathing crops, while the majority will begin in the next few weeks as weather allows. Haying progress has been slow and there are reports of hay deteriorating in the swath as conditions have not been conducive for dry-down.  

Rain in the region varied from trace amounts to 42 mm in the Glaslyn area. The Meadow Lake area has recorded 392 mm of rain since April 1, the greatest amount for the region. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as eight per cent surplus and 92 per cent adequate, while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as five per cent surplus and 95 per cent adequate.

Hail, strong winds and heavy rain have lodged and damaged some crops in the area. There are reports of some producers spraying for lygus bugs and diamondback moths in canola crops as economic thresholds have been exceeded. Farmers are busy hauling bales, spraying for insects and getting ready for harvest.  

 


 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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