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       Monday, October 23, 2017

Saskatchewan Agriculture has a group of 230 volunteer crop reporters from across the province. Thank you for your valued dedication to the crop report. In 2014, there are eight crop reporters reaching their 20 year milestone; nine reaching 25 years; five reaching 30 years and two reaching 35 years of crop reporting.
Congratulations!!

One year ago
Harvest was complete for most producers by mid-to-late October. Yields were well-above long term averages.

Follow the 2014 Crop Report on Twitter @SKAgriculture

 

Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Reminder
November 15- Deadline to submit Production Declarations, yield loss claims, extensions of insurance and fall seeded acreage report.

 

Harvest is essentially complete in the province as the majority of the crop is now in the bin, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report.  However, there are some crops, such as flax, canary seed and sunflowers, left to be combined.

Harvest was challenging for most producers, mainly due to delayed maturity and excess moisture.  Cereal and pulse crop quality remains an issue for much of the province, with the majority of cereal and pulse crops rating well below the 10-year average.  Yields vary throughout the province and are reported as average in most cases.  Yields are reported as 38 bushels per acre for hard red spring wheat, 37 bushels per acre for durum, 82 bushels per acre for oats, 58 bushels per acre for barley, 31 bushels per acre for canola, 34 bushels per acre for peas and 1,371 lb. per acre for lentils.

Average hay yields on dry land are reported as 1.5 tons per acre (alfalfa), 1.4 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome hay), 1.3 tons per acre (other tame hay), one ton per acre (wild hay) and 1.8 tons per acre (greenfeed).  On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.2 tons per acre (alfalfa hay), 1.6 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome hay), 1.7 tons per acre (other tame hay), 2.3 tons per acre (wild hay) and 2.7 tons per acre (greenfeed).  Cattle producers have indicated that they have adequate to surplus winter feed supplies.

The number of acres seeded to winter cereals is below average in most areas.  A late harvest, wet field conditions and poor seed quality in many areas limited the number of acres seeded this fall.

Some areas of the province received both rainfall and snowfall this past week.  Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, five per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate and six per cent short.  The southeast and east-central regions are reporting excess moisture in many fields.

Farmers are busy completing fall work and bringing cattle home from pastures.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

The southeastern region has the majority of the crop in the bin, although there are some flax, canaryseed and durum crops remaining in the field. There are reports that some fields may not be harvested until the ground freezes or even next spring due to excess moisture. Harvest was very challenging for producers as wet conditions delayed progress and caused quality issues. Crop yields are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and impact of diseases such as fusarium in cereals and root rot in pulses.   

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 20 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and one per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Crop districts 1B and 2B are reporting 38 per cent and 29 per cent, respectively, of cropland acres as having surplus topsoil moisture, while 35 per cent of hay land and pasture acres in 1B have surplus topsoil moisture. There are concerns that winter will bring large amounts of snow that may cause flooding issues in the spring.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and alfalfa/brome 1.6; other tame hay 1.4; wild hay 1.1 and greenfeed 1.8. Average irrigated hay yields for the region are 2.5 tons per acre for alfalfa and two tons per acre for other tame hay. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Crop reporters have indicated that winter cereal acres are down from previous years, mainly due to a late harvest and excess moisture.

Farmers are busy completing fall work, hauling bales, bringing cattle home from pasture and putting machinery away.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Harvest is essentially complete in the region, although there are still a few fields of flax, canaryseed and chickpeas left to be combined. Crop yields are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and impact of diseases such as root rot and fusarium.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as nine per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and two per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 98 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Recent moisture has replenished topsoil in much of the region, although there are some areas reporting excess moisture. Crop districts 3ASW, 3AN and 3BS are reporting 20 per cent, 16 per cent and 17 per cent, respectively, of cropland acres as having surplus topsoil moisture.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.3; alfalfa/brome 1.2; other tame hay 1.0; wild hay 0.9 and greenfeed 1.6. Average irrigated hay yields are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.6; alfalfa/brome 1.5; other tame hay 1.0; and greenfeed 2.0. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Crop reporters have indicated that winter cereal acres are down from previous years, mainly due to a late harvest, excess moisture and poor seed quality.

Farmers are busy completing fall work, bringing cattle home from pasture, putting machinery away, hauling bales and cleaning up yards.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

Harvest is all but complete for producers, although there are some flax, canaryseed, durum and soybean crops that remain in the field. There are reports that some fields may not be harvested until the ground freezes or even next spring due to excess moisture Harvest was very challenging for producers as wet conditions delayed progress and caused quality issues. Crop yields are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and impact of diseases such as root rot and fusarium.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into winter are rated as 30 per cent surplus, 66 per cent adequate, three per cent short and one per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 16 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and five per cent short. Crop districts 5A and 6A are reporting that 31 per cent of cropland acres have surplus topsoil moisture, while 18 per cent of hay land and pasture acres have surplus topsoil moisture in CD 5B. There are concerns that winter will bring large amounts of snow that may cause flooding issues in the spring.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and alfalfa/brome 1.6; other tame hay 1.3; wild hay 1.0 and greenfeed 1.9. Average irrigated hay yields for alfalfa and alfalfa/brome are 2.3 tons per acre. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Crop reporters have indicated that winter cereal acres are down from previous years, mainly due to a late harvest, excess moisture and poor seed quality.

Farmers are busy hauling bales, cleaning up yards and corrals, putting machinery away and completing fall work.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Harvest is essentially complete in the region, although there are a few fields of flax and canaryseed that have yet to be harvested. Crop yields and quality are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and impact of diseases such as root rot and fusarium.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as two per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and 15 per cent short. Recent moisture has replenished topsoil in much of the region, although there are some areas that remain dry and in need of some moisture prior to winter.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.7; alfalfa/brome 1.5; other tame hay 1.4; wild hay 1.0 and greenfeed 2.2. Average irrigated hay yields are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.9; alfalfa/brome and other tame hay 2.2; wild hay 2.3; and greenfeed 3.5. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Crop reporters have indicated that winter cereal acres are down from previous years, mainly due to a late harvest, excess moisture and poor seed quality.

Farmers are busy bringing cattle home from pasture, cleaning up yards, hauling bales and completing fall work.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Harvest is all but done in the northeastern region. Crop yields and quality are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and the impact of diseases such as root rot and fusarium.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into winter are rated as four per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short. Recent moisture has replenished topsoil in much of the region, although there are some areas that remain dry and in need of some moisture prior to winter.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.1; alfalfa/brome 1.7; other tame hay 1.4; wild hay 1.3; and greenfeed 2.0. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Crop reporters have indicated that winter cereal acres are down from previous years, mainly due to a late harvest, excess moisture and poor seed quality.

Farmers are busy cleaning up yards and corrals, hauling bales, putting machinery away and bringing cattle home from pasture.  


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Harvest has wrapped up for producers in the region. Crop yields and quality are variable across the region, depending on moisture received throughout the season and the impact of diseases such as fusarium and root rot.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as nine per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and three per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and one per cent very short. Recent moisture has replenished topsoil in much of the region, although there are some areas that remain dry and in need of some moisture prior to winter.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.7; alfalfa/brome and other tame hay 1.4; wild hay 1.1 and greenfeed 1.7. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain).

Farmers are busy bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales, cleaning yards and completing fall work.


Provincial Estimated Crop Yields - November 3, 2014

  Winter
wheat
Fall rye HRSW Other
wheat*
Durum Oat Barley Canaryseed
Southeast 43 36 36 39 37 63 57 1,081
Southwest 39 37 36 39 38 62 54 1,035
East Central 37 36 37 44 30 78 53 1,400
West Central 40 27 39 46 40 73 58 1,268
Northeast 30 N/A 38 35 38 92 61 1,236
Northwest  38 35 42 50 N/A 91 70 1,750
Provincial   40 36 38 43 37 82 58 1,174
10 yr. prov. avg
(2004-2013)
42 35 36 36 35 74 54 1,029
  Flax Canola Mustard Soybean Pea Lentil  Chickpea  
Southeast 23 30 791 19 25 954 1,142  
Southwest 24 33 1,109 22 37 1,509 1,706  
East Central 22 29 817 20 27 1,400 N/A  
West Central 26 36 1,135 30 38 1,410 1,490  
Northeast 22 27 775 24 32 750 N/A  
Northwest  24 36 N/A N/A 37 1500 N/A  
Provincial   23 31 1,069 19 34 1,371 1,627  
10 yr. prov. avg 
(2004-2013)
21 30 814 N/A 33 1,333 1,476  

*

'Other wheat' includes all wheat classes other than Hard Red Spring Wheat

 **

Crop yield predictions at this point in time. Please keep in mind these are regional averages, and yields can vary greatly across an area.

 ***

canaryseed, mustard, lentil and chickpea in lbs/ac. All other crops in bu/ac.
Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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