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          Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 One year ago
Seventy-eight per cent of the 2014 crop had been seeded. Heavy rain delayed field operations, with some areas in the east-central region reporting over three inches.

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Seeding Progress in SK
Per cent seeded
All Crops

June 1, 2015

97

5 year avg. (2010-2014)

73

June 2/14

78

June 3/13

83

May 28/12

74

May 30/11

70

June 3/10

59

10 year avg. (2005-2014)

81

Seeding is nearing completion in the province with 97 per cent of the crop in the ground, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. Progress continues to be well ahead of the five-year (2010-2014) average of 73 per cent seeded for this time of year.

The west-central region is reporting that 99 per cent of the crop is now seeded. The southwestern region has 98 per cent seeded; the southeastern, northeastern and northwestern regions have 97 per cent seeded; and the east-central region has 94 per cent seeded.

Heavy frost late last week has caused damage to crops and producers continue to assess the damage; some re-seeding has occurred. Crop conditions vary across the province but most crops are in fair to good condition. Concerns about crop germination and emergence continue in many areas that have not received much rainfall since April. Flea beetles and cutworms are causing damage in some canola crops across the province.  

Some areas of the province received rain this past week, ranging from small amounts to over an inch in parts of the southwestern and northwestern regions. Rain is needed in much of the province to help recharge the topsoil. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as three per cent surplus, 51 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and nine per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 41 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 16 per cent very short.

Farmers are busy finishing seeding operations and controlling pests.

SK (provincial) Crop Conditions - June 1, 2015

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

13

3

8

5

7

6

6

% good

59

26

57

49

65

60

36

% fair

20

29

29

37

23

29

49

% poor

5

26

5

9

2

4

7

% very poor

3

16

1

0

3

1

2

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

3

3

1

2

6

6

0

% good

56

41

49

67

63

50

34

% fair

30

34

29

29

26

37

66

% poor

8

16

9

1

4

5

0

% very poor

3

6

12

1

1

2

0


 

Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation - June 2015

Crop Insurance customers should note the following important dates:

Full yield loss coverage on winter wheat and fall rye, which is to be grazed and/or cut for feed, becomes effective on June 10.

The deadline for seeding potatoes is June 10 for processing and table varieties and June 15 for seed varieties.

Establishment Benefit claims are to be submitted by June 20 as are claims for crops that fail to establish due to gopher damage.

Full yield loss coverage for established spring and fall seeded crops begins on June 21.

Seeded Acreage Reports and Stored Grain Declarations must be submitted by June 25.

The deadline to submit Unseeded Acreage claims is also June 25.  Claims must be registered with your local Crop Insurance office.

For honey producers enrolled in Crop Insurance, June 25 is the deadline to submit the Hive Reporting form and Stored Honey Report.  This is also the deadline to endorse overwintering insurance for the Bee Mortality Insurance Pilot Program.

The deadline to seed greenfeed crops covered by forage insurance is June 30, with all establishment and gopher damage claims on greenfeed to be submitted by this date.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

Southeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

13

10

14

10

1

9

16

% good

60

73

54

47

69

59

52

% fair

25

13

19

38

14

20

28

% poor

2

2

10

5

11

10

4

% very poor

0

2

3

0

5

2

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

3

10

1

3

13

19

0

% good

70

37

82

69

53

44

40

% fair

19

31

17

27

30

36

10

% poor

7

14

0

1

2

1

25

% very poor

1

8

0

0

2

0

25

Seeding is nearing completion in the region as 97 per cent is now in the ground, up from 87 per cent last week. Crop damage from flea beetles and frost has resulted in some re-seeding of canola fields in the region. Warm weather is now needed to help crops develop in many areas.  

Rain was received in some southern and eastern areas of the region, helping improve topsoil moisture conditions. However, significant rain is needed in many other areas of the region to help crops emerge and develop. The Grenfell area is reporting 18 mm of rainfall this past week. Since April 1, the Indian Head area has received 101 mm of rainfall, the greatest amount for both the region and the province.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 10 per cent surplus, 65 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate, 27 per cent short and one per cent very short. Crop District 1A is reporting that 22 per cent of cropland and 19 per cent of hay and pasture land has surplus topsoil moisture at this time. CDs 2A and 3ASE are reporting that 50 per cent and 52 per cent, respectively, of cropland acres are short topsoil moisture at this time while 60 per cent and 63 per cent, respectively, of hay and pasture acres are short topsoil moisture.   

The majority of crops are in fair to good condition, although lack of moisture, frost and flea beetles have caused much of the damage this past week. There are also reports of wireworms and cutworms in some crops. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, controlling pests, hauling grain and picking rocks.

 


 

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Southwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

0

0

3

3

0

0

0

% good

73

11

57

55

62

57

21

% fair

8

33

30

31

28

31

62

% poor

11

35

10

11

10

12

17

% very poor

8

21

0

0

0

0

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

1

0

0

0

2

1

0

% good

43

33

43

100

69

55

35

% fair

36

36

27

0

21

33

65

% poor

15

20

11

0

6

7

0

% very poor

5

11

19

0

2

4

0

Ninety-eight per cent of the crop is now seeded in the southwest, up from 93 per cent last week. Crop damage from flea beetles and frost has resulted in some re-seeding of oilseed fields in the region

Scattered showers moved throughout the region, bringing relief to some areas. However, some crops in the region have not emerged due to lack of moisture and significant rain is needed to help with crop, hay and pasture development. The Blumenhof area received the greatest amount of rainfall last week (29 mm) while the Fife Lake area has received the greatest amount of rainfall since April (91 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate in the region and cropland topsoil moisture conditions are now rated as 39 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 21 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 26 per cent adequate, 46 per cent short and 28 per cent very short. Crop Districts 3BN, 4A and 4B are reporting that 25 per cent, 26 per cent and 50 per cent, respectively, of cropland is very short topsoil moisture. CDs 4A and 4B are also reporting that 46 per cent and 50 per cent, respectively, of hay and pasture land is very short topsoil moisture.  

The majority of crops are in poor to good condition. Flea beetles, frost, cutworms and lack of moisture have caused most of the crop damage this week. There are also reports of grasshoppers in the region. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, fixing fences and controlling pests.

 


 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

East-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

38

35

5

7

0

1

0

% good

43

24

69

66

75

69

49

% fair

14

29

26

27

24

29

51

% poor

4

12

0

0

1

1

0

% very poor

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

0

1

0

0

1

4

0

% good

58

52

90

62

87

87

100

% fair

37

30

10

38

12

9

0

% poor

2

11

0

0

0

0

0

% very poor

3

6

0

0

0

0

0

Seeding operations are nearly complete in the region as 94 per cent of the crop is seeded, up from 83 per cent last week. Hard frost late last week significantly damaged emerged crops and many fields are being re-seeded. Like much of the province, the east-central region could use some rain and warm weather to help crops emerge and develop.  

Rain this past week ranged from nil to 22 mm in the Earl Grey area. The Craik area reported the greatest amount of rainfall since April 1, with 92 mm. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as seven per cent surplus, 57 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 56 per cent adequate, 32 per cent short and seven per cent very short. Crop District 5B is reporting that six per cent of cropland is very short topsoil moisture while CD 6A is reporting that 10 per cent of hay land and pasture is very short topsoil moisture at this time.  

Most crops in the region are in fair to good condition, although emergence has been slower than normal. Flea beetles, frost and lack of moisture have caused the majority of crop damage this week. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, controlling pests and assessing whether to re-seed or not.

 


 

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

West-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

0

0

6

7

13

10

0

% good

45

30

39

22

41

40

14

% fair

40

66

49

58

46

45

73

% poor

15

4

5

11

0

4

7

% very poor

0

0

1

2

0

1

6

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

10

4

2

0

6

5

0

% good

28

22

23

29

51

34

0

% fair

55

56

53

69

39

52

100

% poor

4

17

15

2

3

8

0

% very poor

3

1

7

0

1

1

0

The west-central region leads the province in seeding progress as 99 per cent of the crop is now seeded, up from 93 per cent last week. There has been some re-seeding of crops due to frost and flea beetle damage and some producers are spraying for cutworms. Rain is needed to help crops germinate and emerge.  

A storm moved through some parts of the region, bringing hail and strong winds. The Rosetown area received 14 mm, the greatest amount of rainfall for the region, while the Outlook area has received the greatest amount of rainfall since April 1 (55 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions are deteriorating in much of the region. Pastures are slow to green up and there are concerns that there may be a feed shortage if rain is not received soon. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 21 per cent adequate, 65 per cent short and 14 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent adequate, 56 per cent short and 31 per cent very short. Crop District 6B is reporting 17 per cent of cropland and 31 per cent of hay and pasture land to be very short topsoil moisture at this time. CD 7B is also reporting that 35 per cent of hay and pasture land is very short topsoil moisture.

Most crops in the region are in poor to good condition and crop emergence has been slower than normal. Flea beetles, frost and lack of moisture have caused the majority of crop damage this week. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, controlling pests and picking rocks.

 


 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Northeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

31

0

15

17

14

12

13

% good

50

100

68

70

63

67

68

% fair

19

0

11

13

15

15

6

% poor

0

0

6

0

0

0

13

% very poor

0

0

0

0

8

6

0

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

15

0

N/A

0

15

0

N/A

% good

52

52

N/A

62

70

95

N/A

% fair

25

28

N/A

38

14

5

N/A

% poor

8

14

N/A

0

1

0

N/A

% very poor

0

6

N/A

0

0

0

N/A

Seeding is wrapping up in the region as 97 per cent is now in the ground, up significantly from 75 per cent last week. Hard frost has damaged many crops in the area and some canola crops are now being re-seeded if moisture is available.

Some parts of the region received rainfall last week, although more is needed soon to help replenish the topsoil. The Bruno area received 19 mm of rainfall, bringing its total received since April 1 to 76 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 73 per cent adequate, 23 per cent short and four per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 62 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and one per cent very short. Crop District 8A is reporting that 52 per cent of cropland and 68 per cent of hay and pasture land are short topsoil moisture at this time.

The majority of crops in the region are in fair to good condition, although there has been damage from flea beetles, frost and lack of moisture. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding operations, controlling pests, picking rocks and fixing fences.

 


 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Northwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Canaryseed

% excellent

0

5

7

N/A

10

9

N/A

% good

0

10

58

N/A

59

56

N/A

% fair

0

30

35

N/A

30

35

N/A

% poor

0

5

0

N/A

1

0

N/A

% very poor

100

50

0

N/A

0

0

N/A

 

Flax

Canola

Mustard

Soybean

Pea

Lentil

Chickpea

% excellent

0

1

0

N/A

17

44

N/A

% good

50

34

0

N/A

45

19

N/A

% fair

0

29

100

N/A

38

37

N/A

% poor

50

32

0

N/A

0

0

N/A

% very poor

0

4

0

N/A

0

0

N/A

Seeding is nearing completion in the region with 97 per cent in the ground, up from 89 per cent last week. There has been re-seeding of some crops in the region that were hit hard with frost late last week. Some producers are also spraying for flea beetles in canola.  

Some areas of the region received rain that has helped to replenish topsoil moisture. However, significant rain is needed to help crop, hay and pasture development. The Hafford area reported 39 mm of rainfall this past week, bringing its total received since April 1 to 76 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved slightly in the region thanks to the recent rain. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are now rated as two per cent surplus, 61 per cent adequate, 26 per cent short and 11 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 36 per cent adequate, 46 per cent short and 18 per cent very short. Crop District 9B is reporting that 19 per cent of cropland and 24 per cent of hay land and pasture are very short topsoil moisture at this time.

The majority of crops in the region are in fair to good condition, although there has been damage from flea beetles, frost and lack of moisture. Farmers are busy finishing up seeding operations, controlling pests and fixing fences.

 


 

Related Links

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