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    Saturday, December 16, 2017

One year ago

Fourty-two per cent of the 2014 hay crop had been cut and 49 per cent had been baled or put into silage. Rain and high humidity delayed haying and decreased hay quality.

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SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

29

66

5

Spring Cereals

16

68

16

Oilseeds

13

64

23

Pulse Crops

24

63

13

Haying continues in the province. Livestock producers now have 54 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage, with an additional 18 per cent cut and ready for baling, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Rain showers have delayed haying in some areas. Hay quality is currently rated as two per cent excellent, 52 per cent good, 38 per cent fair and eight per cent poor. Hay yields on dry land are well below the five-year average (2010-2014). Average hay yields on dry land are estimated to be 0.8 ton per acre for alfalfa, 0.9 ton per acre for alfalfa/brome hay, 0.7 ton per acre for both other tame hay and wild hay and 1.3 tons per acre for greenfeed. On irrigated land, average hay yields are estimated to be 2.2 tons per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/brome hay, 2.5 tons per acre for other tame hay, 1.9 tons per acre for wild hay and 3.1 tons per acre for greenfeed.

The Ministry of Agriculture has a Forage, Feed and Custom Service listing for producers to advertise and source feed products. It is available at: http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/FeedForageListing  

Much of the province received rain last week that has helped alleviate moisture stress in some areas. Rainfall ranged from small amounts to several inches. Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved in many areas. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as two per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 36 per cent adequate, 43 per cent short and 20 per cent very short.

Sixty-six per cent of the fall cereals, 68 per cent of the spring cereals, 64 per cent of the oilseeds and 63 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Crops are ripening quickly, although the majority remain in poor-to-good condition. Lack of moisture and insects such as grasshoppers and aphids have caused the most crop damage this week.

Farmers are busy cutting hay, controlling pests and readying harvest equipment.  

Estimated Provincial Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

0.8

2.2

Brome/Alfalfa

0.9

2.2

Other Tame Hay

0.7

2.5

Wild Hay

0.7

1.9

Greenfeed

1.3

3.1


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

SE SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

29

68

3

Spring Cereals

22

65

13

Oilseeds

21

61

18

Pulse Crops

23

61

16

Haying continues in the region and 61 per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. An additional 17 per cent is cut and ready for baling. Hay quality at this time is rated as 65 per cent good, 30 per cent fair and five per cent poor. Yields are well-below average and many producers are hoping for timely rains so that a second cut may be possible.

Much of the region received rainfall this past week that has helped alleviate moisture stress in many areas. The Tantallon area received the greatest amount of rainfall for the week (48 mm), bringing its total received since April 1 to 196 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved thanks to the recent rain. Cropland topsoil moisture is currently rated as one per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 38 per cent short and eight per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 34 per cent adequate, 57 per cent short and eight per cent very short. Crop District 3ASE is reporting that 40 per cent of cropland, hay land and pasture remain very short topsoil moisture at this time.  

Many crops are ripening quickly in the region and some producers have indicated that they will begin desiccating pulses and combining winter cereals in the coming weeks. There are reports of crops being sprayed for grasshoppers and aphids, although damage is minimal in many areas. The majority of crop damage this week was caused by wind, hail, insects and lack of moisture.   

Farmers are busy cutting hay and readying harvest equipment.

Estimated Southeast Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.0

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

1.0

N/A

Other Tame Hay

0.7

N/A

Wild Hay

0.7

N/A

Greenfeed

1.4

N/A


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

SW SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

36

59

5

Spring Cereals

27

63

10

Oilseeds

24

62

14

Pulse Crops

37

56

7

Seventy-two per cent of the hay crop has now been baled or put into silage, with an additional 16 per cent cut and soon ready for baling. Hay quality at this time is rated as 43 per cent good, 50 per cent fair and seven per cent poor. Hay yields are significantly less than normal and many producers are hoping that rain comes soon so that a second cut of hay may be possible.

Rain was welcomed in the region as it has helped to alleviate moisture stress in some areas. The Hazenmore area received 47 mm of rain this past week, bringing its total received since April 1 to 187 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly deteriorated despite the recent rain. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 23 per cent adequate, 47 per cent short and 30 per cent very short, while hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 15 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and 48 per cent very short. Crop District 4B is reporting that 72 per cent of cropland and 70 per cent of hay land and pasture are very short topsoil moisture at this time.

There are indications that producers are likely to begin desiccating pulses and harvesting winter cereals in the coming weeks. Crops are ripening quickly, although there are concerns that the hot weather will affect crops that are still flowering. The majority of crop damage this past week was caused by lack of moisture and insects such as grasshoppers and aphids.

Farmers are busy cutting hay and readying harvest equipment.

Estimated Southwest Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

0.6

2.4

Brome/Alfalfa

0.6

2.7

Other Tame Hay

0.7

N/A

Wild Hay

0.4

2.0

Greenfeed

0.9

N/A


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

EC SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

20

76

4

Spring Cereals

13

72

15

Oilseeds

10

67

23

Pulse Crops

11

81

8

Livestock producers now have 40 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage. An additional 23 per cent is cut and will soon ready for baling. Hay quality at this time is rated as three per cent excellent, 50 per cent good, 44 per cent fair and three per cent poor. Hay yields are significantly less than normal and feed shortage concerns continue.

The region received varying amounts of rain this past week, ranging from small amounts to 67 mm in the Saltcoats area. Since April 1, the Saltcoats area has received the greatest amount of rainfall for both the region and the province (229 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved, although additional rain will be needed to help crops fill and pastures grow. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as nine per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent excellent, 67 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and four per cent very short. Crop District 5B is reporting that 18 per cent of cropland acres and 11 per cent of hay and pasture land have surplus topsoil moisture at this time.

Crops are ripening quickly, although many later-seeded crops are just starting to flower. Some producers are spraying for diseases such as fusarium and insects such as aphids and wheat midge. Most crop damage this week was caused by lack of moisture, wind, hail and insects.

Farmers are busy cutting hay and controlling pests.

Estimated East-central Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

0.9

2.3

Brome/Alfalfa

1.0

2.3

Other Tame Hay

0.8

N/A

Wild Hay

0.8

N/A

Greenfeed

1.3

N/A


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B - Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar area)

WC SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

2

82

16

Spring Cereals

14

57

29

Oilseeds

11

59

30

Pulse Crops

10

71

19

Haying continues in the region. Fifty-nine per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage and an additional 17 per cent is cut and will soon ready for baling. Hay quality at this time is rated as 35 per cent good, 40 per cent fair and 25 per cent poor. Hay yields are significantly down and quality has deteriorated in some areas.

Rain was welcomed in the region this past week as it helped to alleviate moisture stress in some areas. The Dinsmore area received the greatest amount for the region (65 mm), while the Smiley area has received the greatest amount of rainfall since April 1 (160 mm).

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved slightly. Conditions on cropland are rated as 40 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 20 per cent very short. Topsoil moisture conditions on hay land and pasture are rated as 29 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 31 per cent very short. Crop District 6B is reporting that 26 per cent of cropland and 33 per cent of hay land and pasture are very short topsoil moisture at this time.

Desiccation of pulses and combining of winter cereals will begin soon in the region as crops are ripening quickly. However, there are many crops that are behind their normal developmental stages and will need more time to mature. Some producers are spraying for grasshoppers, aphids and fusarium when conditions allow. The majority of crop damage this week was caused by lack of moisture, hail, wind and insects.

Farmers are busy cutting hay and readying harvest equipment.

Estimated West-central Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

0.7

2.0

Brome/Alfalfa

0.7

1.9

Other Tame Hay

0.5

2.5

Wild Hay

0.5

1.9

Greenfeed

1.1

3.1


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

NE SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

7

91

2

Spring Cereals

11

82

7

Oilseeds

9

75

16

Pulse Crops

20

73

7

Forty-three per cent of the hay is now baled or put into silage, while an additional 16 per cent is cut and will soon ready for baling. Hay quality is currently rated as eight per cent excellent, 69 per cent good and 23 per cent fair. Recent rain has delayed haying and lowered quality in some areas.

Much of the region received rain that has helped to alleviate moisture stress in many areas. The Porcupine Plain area reported 76 mm of rainfall this past week, while the Star City area has reported 210 mm of rain since April 1.  

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved in the region. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 86 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and four per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 74 per cent adequate, 21 per cent short and five per cent very short.

Crop development varies across the region, but most crops are in fair-to-good condition. Some producers are spraying for grasshoppers and aphids, although pressure is minimal in many areas. The majority of crop damage this past week was caused by lack of moisture, wind and hail.

Farmers are busy cutting hay and controlling pests.

Estimated Northeast Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

1.1

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

1.1

N/A

Other Tame Hay

0.9

N/A

Wild Hay

0.8

N/A

Greenfeed

1.0

N/A


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

NW SK Crop Development - July 20

 

% Ahead

% Normal

% Behind

Fall Cereals

6

81

13

Spring Cereals

1

76

23

Oilseeds

2

56

42

Pulse Crops

2

85

13

Haying continues in the area with 28 per cent baled or put into silage. An additional 19 per cent is cut and will soon ready for baling. Hay quality is currently rated as 67 per cent good, 17 per cent fair and 16 per cent poor, but is deteriorating in some areas.  

Rainfall this past week ranged from small amounts to 48 mm in the Meadow Lake area. Since April 1, the Duck Lake area has received 170 mm of rainfall, the greatest amount for the region.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved since last week thanks to the recent rainfall. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 61 per cent adequate, 38 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 34 per cent adequate, 63 per cent short and three per cent very short.

Some producers are spraying crops for grasshoppers and aphids as conditions permit. Crop development varies in the region, but most crops are in poor-to-good condition. The majority of crop damage this past week was caused by lack of moisture, insects and wind.

Farmers are busy controlling pests and cutting hay.

Estimated Northwest Hay Yields (tons/acre) - July 20, 2015

 

Dry land

Irrigated Land

Alfalfa

0.9

N/A

Brome/Alfalfa

0.9

N/A

Other Tame Hay

0.7

N/A

Wild Hay

1.1

N/A

Greenfeed

1.7

N/A


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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