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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Some seeding is underway in southern and west central areas of the province, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food's weekly crop report.

Peas, wheat, and canola were reported to have been seeded during the past week. Most northern and east central areas are two to three weeks away from seeding.

Central and northern areas are reporting adequate to surplus topsoil moisture conditions. North eastern and east central areas are looking for drying conditions to help very wet fields. Southern areas have pockets of short to very short topsoil moisture conditions. Recent precipitation helped improve many southern regions to an adequate moisture rating.

Just below one per cent of the harvest was left out over the winter, and about one-third of that is expected to be combined this spring. Northern areas are home to the bulk of the leftover harvest.

Livestock feed grain and forage supplies are reported in a carry over position by 86 per cent of reporters. One-third of south western reporters indicated shortages of livestock feed, while two-thirds indicated more adequate supplies.

Pastures are reported in good to excellent condition by almost half of the reporters. Warm weather should improve pasture conditions in most areas of the province. Some southern areas are experiencing a shortage of livestock water supplies, while central and northern areas have adequate supplies.

Farmers are fixing fences, readying machinery, picking rocks, applying chemicals and fertilizer, and cleaning grain.

One Year Ago

  • Surplus moisture in the east central and northeast regions; localized areas of short moisture in the south.
  • Pastures conditions were generally reported as fair to good.
  • Southern regions reported some inadequate livestock water supplies.
  • Peas, durum, and forages were being seeded; some combining in west central region.

SCIC Crop Report Submission - April 2007

If you received an extension of insurance on a crop in the fall of 2006, Saskatchewan Crop Insurance reminds you to notify your customer service office as soon as you complete harvest and/or before putting your crop to an alternate use (abandoning, baling, grazing, etc.). In all cases, claims due to either yield or quality losses must be finalized by June 10, 2007 and any harvested production information must be reported in order to update your annual yield.

If you would like a reminder notifying you of upcoming deadlines, sign up for Crop Insurance's free e-Deadline Reminder service at www.saskcropinsurance.com. Crop Insurance also offers a monthly e-Newsletter to interested customers, featuring up-to-date information on our programs and services.

South eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 1, 2, & 3as-east)

This past week in the southeast was warm and windy, with some showers. An average of 4 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from a low of 2 mm reported in Crop District (CD) 1b, to a high of 6 mm reported in CD 1a.

Topsoil moisture on crop land is generally adequate across the southeast. Areas with the majority of the short topsoil moisture conditions are in CDs 1a and 2a. On hay and pasture land, topsoil moisture conditions are roughly two-thirds adequate and one-third short. Crop District 3ase contains the majority of the very short moisture conditions. There is a need for more moisture in most areas.

Less than 1/2% of the south eastern crop remained to be harvested from last year. All of last year's unharvested crop east of Weyburn is expected to be harvested this spring, while none of the crop northwest of Moose Jaw will be harvested.

Over 85% of south eastern reporters indicated carry over of livestock forage and feed grain supplies.

About one-third of reporters indicate that pastures are in good to excellent condition and just under one-third indicate pastures are in poor to very poor condition. Ninety-five per cent of reporters indicate that livestock water supplies are adequate.

Seeding has begun in the Grenfell and Indian Head areas, with peas and wheat being planted. Many other areas expect to get started before this week is out.

Farmers are picking rocks, fencing, applying fertilizer, harrowing, applying chemical, and cleaning grain. Fertilizer, some glyphosphate, some chemical, and some varieties of canola are in short supply. Gophers are plentiful in the Kennedy area. Some cattle producers were facing scours and pneumonia problems in the Odessa and Minton areas. Reporters tell us that the wood ticks are out.

South western Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 3as-west, 3an, 3b, & 4)

The southwest was warm and windy in some areas and cool and rainy in others during the past week. An average of 11 mm of precipitation was reported during the past week, ranging from an average low of 2 mm reported in CDs 3asw and 3an, to an average high of 30 mm reported in CD 4a.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land are generally adequate with most areas having pockets of short moisture conditions, most notably in CD 3asw. Crop District 4b has some surplus topsoil moisture conditions. On hay and pasture land, topsoil moisture is generally adequate, though all regions have some short pockets and CDs 3asw, 3an, and 3bs have pockets of very short topsoil moisture. Those areas need rain soon.

Less than 1/2% of last year's harvest remained out over winter in the southwest. All of the crop out in CDs 3an and 3bn is expected to be combined, while the crop left out in CD 3bs will not be harvested.

Sixty-two per cent of south western reporters rated livestock forage supplies in a carry over position, and 69% rated feed grain supplies in a carry over position. Some farmers are down to their last bales and are seeking more feed. There is some difficulty finding truckers.

Just over one-third of south western reporters rated pastures in good condition and just below 20% rated pastures in poor to very poor condition. Ninety-four per cent of reporters indicated that livestock water supplies were adequate. Dugouts did not fill in some areas, and they are nervous for sufficient water.

Seeding has begun in the Big Beaver, Viceroy, Spring Valley, Coderre, Central Butte, Orkney, Consul, Maple Creek, and Burstall areas with peas, wheat, and canola being planted. Many areas expect to be seeding this week, weather permitting.

Farmers are picking rocks, getting equipment ready, fixing fences, applying chemicals, and disking. There were shortages of some inputs reported, including chemicals, fertilizer, and legume inocculant. Large numbers of gophers were reported in the Mankota, Val Marie, Ponteix, Vanguard, and Rush Lake areas. Fall rye and winter wheat are starting to turn green. Several farmers reported seeing the first crocuses.

East central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 5 & 6a)

Weather conditions varied from warm, sunny, and windy to cool and wet in the east central region during the past week. An average of 3 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from an average low of 3 mm reported in CD 6a, to an average high of 4 mm reported in CD 5a.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop, hay and pasture land were generally adequate to surplus across the region. There were small pockets of short moisture conditions. Some areas have standing water, and need drying conditions to help ready the land for spring work.

Just below 1% of the 2006 crop remained to be harvested in the east central region. Close to 40% of that is expected to be combined. While some areas expect to harvest the entire 2006 crop, others expect to harvest none of it. Wildlife was very damaging to crops over the winter. In CD 6a, canola swaths were scattered by the wind and moved by flowing water.

Ninety-five per cent of reporters rate livestock feed supplies in a carry over position, though some indicate that there is not much left.

Just over 40% of reporters rate pastures in good to excellent condition, and about 10% rates pastures as poor or very poor. All reporters indicate that there are adequate livestock water supplies.

Farmers do not expect to see seeding much before the first of May; others estimate mid-May at the earliest.

Farmers are applying fertilizer, spraying, harrowing, and getting equipment ready. There are some shortages of fertilizer and certain canola and barley varieties. Creeks are full and running over in CD 5b. There have been washouts and water erosion in fields. In RM 337, there were at least 35 roads with water running over them this past week. Other RMs report roads washed out and/or closed. Winter wheat and fall rye crops are coming out of dormancy.

West central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 6b & 7)

The west central region generally saw seasonal temperatures with several very windy days. An average of 6 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from an average low of 3 mm reported in CD 7b, to an average high of 10 mm reported in CD 7a.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland and hay and pasture land are generally adequate in the west central region. Crop District 5b reports over 90% in a surplus position for crop land and close to 80% in surplus for hay and pasture land. There are some small pockets of short topsoil moisture conditions.

Close to 1% of the 2006 crop was left out in the west central region. Around 20% of that is expected to be combined.

Ninety-seven per cent of reporters rate livestock forage supplies in a carry over position, and 85% rate feed grain supplies in a carry over position.

Over 80% of reporters rate pasture conditions as good to excellent in the west central region, while below 10% rate them as poor or very poor. All crop reporters rate livestock water supplies as adequate.

Some seeding has started in the Marengo area, and a few think they could get started by the end of the week.

Farmers are cleaning machinery, applying chemicals, picking rocks, harrowing, and cleaning grain. There were some input shortages reported, including herbicides, varieties of pea, oat, and canola seed, fertilizer, and potential fuel shortages. Roads are soft, thus affecting grain delivery. Field access roads are of poor quality. The first crocuses are out.

North eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 8 & 9a-east)

The northeast had a lot of wind this past week, with reasonably warm temperatures as the week progressed. An average of 3 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from an average low of 1 mm reported in CD 9ae, to an average high of 5 mm reported in CD 8a.

Over 90% of the land in the northeast is in a surplus moisture situation. Low lying areas are full of water. There has been some water erosion in fields.

Between 1% and 2% of the 2006 crop was left out in north eastern fields over winter and about one-quarter of that is expected to be combined. Wildlife damaged some of the crop.

Ninety-five per cent of reporters rate livestock feed supplies in the carry over position.

Pasture conditions are reported as good to excellent by 55% of north eastern reporters. Close to 40% rate pastures as poor or very poor. Sun and heat should improve many of those pastures. All crop reporters rate livestock water supplies as adequate.

Reporters estimate it will be two or three weeks before fieldwork can begin. There are some concerns of fertilizer shortages. Culverts have been washed out and roads flooded and closed. There are some concerns about getting to fields around the damaged roads.

North western Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 9a-west & 9b)

The northwest saw generally warm temperatures which helped melt more snow during the past week. An average of 3 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from an average low of 2 mm reported in CD 9ae, to an average high of 4 mm reported in CD 9b.

Crop District 9aw reports over 50% of crop land in a surplus moisture situation, while CD 9b is drier with only 10% in surplus condition. Low lying areas are covered with water.

North western areas had over 1% of the 2006 crop out over the winter. Farmers hope to combine 65% of that crop. Some of the crop was lost to wildlife damage.

All reporters rate livestock feed grain supplies in the carry over position, and 95% report forage in a carry over position. Some farmers had to buy feed.

Sixty-five per cent of north western reporters rate pastures in good to excellent condition, while 15% rate pastures in poor condition. All crop reporters rate livestock water supplies as adequate.

Farmers are preparing machinery for spring fieldwork. There are concerns about fertilizer shortages as well as shortages of viable pea seed. There are lots of gophers in the Debden area. Winter wheat crops are starting to grow. Culverts and bridges are being washed out and some roads are closed.



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