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       Monday, October 23, 2017
1 Year Ago
Less than one per cent of the harvest was left out over the winter - and one third of that was expected to be combined in the spring. Livestock feed grain and forage supplies were reported to be in a carry over position by 86 per cent of crop reporters. Central and northern areas were reporting adequate to surplus topsoil moisture conditions, while southern areas had pockets of short to very short topsoil moisture conditions.

Seeding has started in the southwestern areas of the province, according to Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture's weekly crop report.

Peas and spring cereals were reported to have been seeded during the past week.  In comparison, most northern and central areas are one to three weeks away from seeding.

Using a diagonal line through the grainbelt area from northwest to southeast as a reference, areas below the line are generally in a short to very short topsoil moisture situation.  Areas above the line are generally in an adequate to surplus topsoil moisture situation.  Overall, 50 per cent of the crop land in the province has adequate topsoil moisture, 39 per cent has short or very short topsoil moisture, and the remainder is in a surplus condition.  

Less than one-half of one per cent of the 2007 crop was left out over the winter.  It's not expected that any of that crop will be combined this spring. 

Livestock feed grain and forage supplies are generally reported to be in a carry-over position.  This could change, however, depending on how long it will be before stock can be put out to spring pasture without supplemental feeding.

Shortages of a number of crop inputs have been reported, including chemicals, innoculant, seed, and fertilizer.  Farmers may have to change seeding plans if they are unable to secure the input supplies they require. 

Farmers are busy fixing fences, readying machinery, picking rocks, applying chemicals and fertilizer, and cleaning grain.


South eastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, & 3as-east)

This past week, the southeast was cool and cloudy, with some rain fall and some warming temperatures. An average of 4 mm of precipitation fell, ranging from a low of less than 1 mm reported in Crop District (CD) 1, to a high of 8 mm reported in CD 3ase.

Fifty-five per cent of crop land is reported to have adequate topsoil moisture in the southeast, while 44% is reported to be in a short to very short topsoil moisture condition. For hay and pasture land, 39% is reported to have adequate topsoil moisture while 60% is reported to have short to very short topsoil moisture. Rain is needed in many areas to ensure crop germination and growth. Dugouts are low and some cattlemen are expecting to be short of water this summer.

No harvest was left out over winter in the southeast.

Most south eastern reporters indicated a carry over of livestock forage and feed grain supplies exists, though some indicated that supplies were inadequate.

Reporters indicated shortages of Edge, fertilizer and glyphosphate. The prices of inputs continue to be raised as a concern.

Gophers and moles are appearing on crop and pasture land.

Farmers are getting machinery ready, attending auction sales, cleaning grain, calving cows and hauling grain.


South western Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3as-west, 3an, 3b, & 4)

The southwest was warm, dry, and windy over much of the past week. An average of 3 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of trace amounts reported in CD 4,to an average high of 8 mm reported in CDs 3asw and 3an.Some hail was reported to have fallen west of Assiniboia, midweek.

Twenty-one per cent of the south western crop land is reported to have adequate topsoil moisture, while 79% is reported to have short or very short topsoil moisture. Fifteen per cent of the hay and pasture land is reported to have adequate topsoil moisture with the balance reporting short or very short topsoil moisture conditions. There are shortages of livestock water in a number of regions in the southwest. Dust was blowing in the Mankota and Maple Creek areas last week.

Less than 1% of last year's crop remained out over winter in the southwest. None of this was expected to be combined this spring. Seeding was taking place south of Cadillac, and in the Consul, Maple Creek, Richmound, and Burstall areas.

The southwest reported the highest number of areas within adequate livestock feed supplies for both feed grain and forage.

Reporters told of shortages of seed treatments, Edge, Round-up, inocculant, Factor, Rival, phosphate fertilizers, trifluralin, and Clean Start. Input prices levels were a concern that reporters expressed.

Farmers are working on gopher control, field chemical applications, cleaning grain, picking rocks, cultivating, and calving cows.


East central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 & 6a)

Weather conditions warmed up as the week progressed in the east central region. An average of 8 mm of precipitation fell during the past week, ranging from an average low of 5 mm reported in CD 5b, to an average high of 10 mm reported in CD 6a. Snow was drifting with the strong winds in some areas. Large amounts of snow are still in the area, but melting is anticipated soon.

East central region reporters rated 62% of the crop land as having adequate topsoil moisture, and 21% as having short or very short topsoil moisture. Sixty-nine per cent of the hay and pasture land was rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, and 18% is rated as having short or very short topsoil moisture.

All the 2007 crop was harvested before winter set in.

Most livestock producers had carry over supplies of feed grain and forage.

Reporters continued to express concern about the high costs of inputs. Shortages of some chemicals, including Edge, and some canola varieties were reported.

Farmers were cleaning grain, applying fertilizer, attending auction sales, and working on machinery. General fieldwork is likely two to three weeks away. Winter wheat was starting to show new growth in the Lumsden area.


West central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6b & 7)

The west central region saw unsettled weather with warming temperatures near the end of the week. An average of 2 mm of precipitation fell, ranging from an average low of 1 mm reported in CD 7, to an average high of 6 mm reported in CD 6b.

Fifty-four per cent of crop land was reported to have adequate topsoil moisture, while 44% was reported to be in a short or very short topsoil moisture condition.

None of the 2007 crop was left out over winter in the west central region.

Livestock feed supplies were generally reported to be in a carry over position.

Some supplies are running short because calves were carried over winter due to poor livestock prices last fall. Some chemicals for preseeding burn-off were reported in short supply. This situation is also reported for Invigour canola seed. Concern continues to be expressed about very high prices for crop inputs.

Farmers are cleaning grain, repairing machinery, calving cows, and applying fertilizer and chemicals. Fall rye fields were starting to green in the Grandora area.


North eastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 & 9a-east)

The northeast had warmer weather that started the snow melting during the past week. An average of 11 mm of precipitation fell. The warm temperatures near the end of the week and the corresponding melt caused water to run over roads in the Melfort area.

Roughly half of crop land has adequate topsoil moisture condition and half in a surplus condition. About two-thirds of hay and pasture land is in adequate condition and one-third has surplus topsoil moisture.

None of the 2007 crop was left out in north eastern fields over winter.

Most of the reporters indicate livestock feed supplies are in a carry over position. Some farmers are short of feed and they are hoping to move cattle out to pastures soon.

Shortages of some fertilizers were mentioned.

Farmers are hauling grain and calving cows.


North western Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9a-west & 9b)

The northwest saw freezing nights but warming daytime temperatures during the past week. An average of 2 mm of precipitation fell, ranging from 1 mm on average in CD 9b, to an average of 3 mm reported in CD 9aw.

North western crop land is rated at 77% in adequate topsoil moisture condition, 16% in surplus condition, with the balance as short. Hay and pasture land is rated as 91% in adequate topsoil moisture condition.

No 2007 crop was left out over winter.

Most reporters indicated livestock feed supplies were in a carry over position. Cattle are still being fed because of the large amount of snow remaining.

Gophers are out in the Turtleford area.

Reporters continue to relay concerns about high fertilizer prices.


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