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       Sunday, October 22, 2017
One Year Ago
Four per cent of the 2007 crop had been combined.
Over three-quarters of the province's crop land was reported to have short or very short topsoil moisture.
Eighty-nine per cent of the first cut hay crop had been baled or made into silage.

Combining of the 2008 crop is just getting underway, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly crop report.

Some peas have been combined in the Spring Valley, Mossbank and Shaunavon areas.  Fall rye and winter wheat are being swathed near Shaunavon, Maple Creek, Kincaid and Harris, and some lentils have been swathed in the Harris area. 

Crops remain up to two weeks behind in many areas, and sustained frost-free weather until at least the end of August will be important to realize the crops' potential.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop, hay and pasture land declined in all regions during the past week.  However, approximately 70 per cent of the province's crop land is still reported to have adequate topsoil moisture.

First-cut haying operations continue to be challenged by showers, with 74 per cent baled or put into silage and an additional 15 per cent cut and awaiting baling.  Many crop reporters do not expect a second cut of hay in their areas. 

As in the previous week, the main sources of crop damage during the past week were hail and insects.  Hail storms occurred primarily north of a line extending from Estevan to Kerrobert.  Insect damage was caused by a variety of pests, including grasshoppers, Lygus bugs, aphids, wheat stem maggots, wheat midge, Bertha armyworms, diamondback moth larvae and sawflies.  Disease pressure came from rust, botrytis, tan spot and non-specified leaf diseases.  Other sources of crop damage during the past week were flooding, wind, heat, lodging and gophers.


South eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 1, 2, & 3ase)

The south eastern region was warm and muggy during the past week with some storms.  An average of 24 mm of rain was reported, ranging from an average low of 10 mm reported in Crop District (CD) 3ase to an average high of 32 mm reported in CD 1b.  Over 50 mm was reported in the Moosomin and Montmartre areas.  Hail was reported across the region.  The wind damaged crops in the Frobisher, Kennedy, Stoughton, Weyburn, Odessa, and Indian Head areas.  Flooding damage was reported in the Broadview and Fillmore areas.  Drought damaged crops in the Gainsborough area.  Some rain fell in that area on the weekend and will help fill some crops, but for the most part the rain came too late.

There was light to moderate hail damage in the Broadview area.  In the Grenfell area, some crops with heavy hail damage have been salvaged through baling.  Hail damage was light in the Weyburn area.  In the Montmartre area, hail was widespread and damage ranged from 5 to 100% - some crops were flattened and some grain bins were blown over in the storm.  Last Monday's wind storm in the Odessa area scattered some hay swaths.  Hail was spotty in the Radville area.  Hail damage was about 5% in the Ceylon area. 

In the Odessa area, cutting of oats for greenfeed has started.                   

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland declined this past week.  Seventy-four per cent of the crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 83% last week.  Conditions remained similar to last week on hay and pasture land with 71% rated as having adequate topsoil moisture.         

Insect damage came from grasshoppers (Oxbow, Lampman, Stoughton, Weyburn, Montmartre, Indian Head, Zehner, Ceylon), aphids (Montmartre, Odessa), and Lygus bugs (Broadview).  Disease pressures came from tan spot (Kennedy, Grenfell, Ceylon) and unspecified leaf diseases (Broadview).  There has been a second flush of weeds with pressure from kochia and wild oats in the Weyburn area. 

Most of the crops flattened in the Kennedy area did come back up, but lodging is a concern.  Crops are showing second, third, and fourth growth in the Zehner area.

First-cut haying operations are moving along around shower activity with 68% baled or silaged, and 16% lying in the swath.  Quality is generally expected to be fair to good.  Second-cut haying has begun in some areas with 28% baled or put into silage and 10% cut across the region.  Many reporters do not expect a second cut in their area.  Farmers in the Moosomin area are expecting their hay crops to be about one-half to two-thirds of normal.  Hay yields are also down in the Zehner and Ceylon areas. 

Farmers are readying equipment and preparing for harvest.


South western Saskatchewan
(CDs 3asw, 3an, 3b, & 4)

The past week was hot and dry in the southwest, with some strong winds.  An average of 2 mm of precipitation was reported, with an average high of 5 mm reported in CD 3bn.  Heat and drought stress were reported across the region.  Crops are showing burning in the Assiniboia, Cadillac, Mankota, Hazenmore, and Vangaurd areas.  Lentils are aborting flowers and flax appears to have stopped flowering in the Moose Jaw area.  Wind damage was reported in the Maple Creek area.  Hail damage was reported in the Viceroy area.  Rain is needed in many areas to relieve crops.

In the Kincaid area, hail affected a wide area, with damage estimates at 35% to 100%.  In the Glenbain area, adjusters are writing 80% to 100% of the crop off from the July 9 storm.        

One per cent of the 2008 south western crop is ready to be straight-combined.  Crops are reported as one to two weeks behind.  Combining of peas has started in the Spring Valley and Mossbank areas.  Swathing of fall rye has begun in the Kincaid area.  In the Shaunavon area, peas and winter wheat are just starting to be harvested.  In the Maple Creek area, swathing of fall rye has started - some will be baled for greenfeed.   

In the Rush Lake area, there is up to two weeks difference in maturity in the same fields.  The growth on hailed peas is causing some problems in the Gull Lake area as the top three inches of the plant is flowering and green while the rest of the plant is ready to be harvested.          

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land deteriorated, with 46% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 68% last week.  For hay and pasture land, 33% is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 56% last week.  It has been three weeks since any significant rainfall in the Mossbank area, and farmers feel that they will be very lucky to get an average crop.             

Grasshoppers caused crop damage in many areas of the region, and some farmers are spraying.  Wheat stem maggot caused crop damage in the Viceroy and Limerick areas.  Gophers caused damage in the Lisieux, Rockglen, Glentworth, Cadillac, Mankota, Pontiex, and Webb areas.  

Haying operations continue to be furthest advanced in the southwest, with 89% of the first-cut hay baled or put into silage.  Quality is expected to be good.  Most reporters do not expect to see a second cut in their area.  In the Cadillac area, average hay yields are down 25% to 35%.  Water for cattle is very low in dugouts and sloughs in the Lucky Lake area.     

Desiccation of peas and lentils has begun.  Farmers are also working on harvest equipment and chemfallowing, hauling hay, and salvaging greenfeed.


East central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 5 & 6a)

The east central region was humid with thunderstorms during the past week.  An average of 18 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of 13 mm reported in CD 6a, to an average high of 25 mm reported in CD 5b.  Over 70 mm was reported in the Foam Lake area.  Hail damage was reported in many areas across the region.  Flooding damage was reported in the Langenburg (some showers of up to 100 mm) and Insinger areas.  Wind damage was reported in the Stockholm, Goodeve, Kuroki, Bulyea, Holdfast, and Humboldt areas.  Some crops were lodged in the Jedburgh, Yorkton, Kamsack, Leroy, and Humboldt areas.

Severe hail went through the Ituna area last Sunday afternoon and completed harvest prematurely for one of the crop reporters.  Hail damage was about 10% in the Foam Lake area.  The southern part of R.M. 333 saw more widespread hail damage.  There was up to 50% hail damage in the Kuroki area - peas seem to have been hit the hardest.  The recent storms have dashed the hopes of an above-average crop for that area.  Hail was spotty in the Lumsden area, ranging from 10% to 50%.  In the Earl Grey area, hail damage was estimated at 2%.  Hail was also spotty in the Bulyea area.  In the Holdfast area, wind and hail damage was estimated at 5% to 100%.  Many fields were totally destroyed leaving some farmers with very little to harvest.  The severe wind/hail storm in R.M. 222 on July 18 left an estimated 100% damage in an area 2 km wide from the SW corner of the R.M. to the NE corner.  There was a smaller storm later that same day, leaving very few farms in the R.M. untouched.  Hail only caused light damage in the Leroy area.                                

There is a lot of second growth in crops in the Langenburg area.  Reporters indicate that crops are up to two weeks behind in maturity. 

Topsoil moisture conditions declined slightly, with 80% of the crop land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 83% last week.  Conditions also deteriorated on hay and pasture land with 77% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 81% last week. 

Insect damage came from sawflies (Leroy), wheat midge (Ituna, Lumsden, Imperial, Nokomis, Leroy, Humboldt), grasshoppers (Lumsden, Holdfast), and aphids (Holdfast, Craik, Leroy).  Farmers were spraying for grasshoppers and aphids in some areas.  Disease pressure came from rust (Leroy), tan spot (Leroy), and unspecified leaf diseases (Saltcoats, Young, Preeceville, Nokomis).  Some lentil crops are showing symptoms of botrytis in the Young area, and there is also suspected to be some anthracnose.  Some fungicide applications took place for some of these diseases.  Late germinating wild oats have come up in many fields in the Yorkton area. 

First-cut haying operations continue to move along as weather permits, with 63% baled or silaged, and a further 21% lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Many reporters do not expect to see a second cut in their area.  There are concerns about having enough feed in the Stockholm area.


West central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 6b & 7) 

The west central region saw storms, cool nights, and some hot days this past week.  An average of 18 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low 9 mm reported in CD 6b, to an average high of 29 mm reported in CD 7b.    Over 50 mm was reported in the Tramping Lake area.  Wind damage, including lodging, was reported in the Grandora, Rosthern, and Cando areas.  Crop damage from hot, dry weather, including burning, was reported in the Hanley, Outlook, Conquest, Eston and Herschel areas.  One more good rain would be welcome.  Hail damage was reported in the Biggar, Kerrobert, Luseland, Denzil, and Unity areas.

Hail damage around Biggar was estimated at 1%.  In the Kerrobert area, damage was estimated at 5%.  In the Luseland area, damage was estimated at 15%.  Hail was spotty and estimated at 10% in the Denzil area.  Crop damage from hail in the Unity area ranged from 0% to 100%.       

Lentils and fall rye were swathed in the Harris area.  Crops are up to two weeks behind in development.

Topsoil moisture conditions declined, with 61% of the crop land rated as having adequate moisture, compared with 69% last week.  Fifty-three per cent of the hay and pasture land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 56% last week.

Insect pressures came from bertha armyworms (Hanley), grasshoppers (Conquest, Harris, Herschel), diamondback moth larvae, (Kerrobert) and wheat midge (Hanley, Herschel, Tramping Lake, Kerrobert, Luseland).  Some farmers sprayed for grasshoppers this past week.  Fungal diseases were reported in the Hanley and Conquest areas.

Cutting and baling the 2008 hay crop is second furthest advanced in the province with 80% baled or silaged, and 14% lying in the swath.  Quality is generally expected to be fair to good.  Some hay was damaged badly by the rain.  Some second cut haying has started in the Kerrobert area.  Many reporters do not expect to harvest a second cut.

Farmers have started to desiccate peas and lentils.  They are also readying machinery for harvest and doing summerfallow and chemfallow.


North eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 8 & 9ae)

The north eastern region was cloudy then sunny during the past week.  An average of 14 mm of rain was reported, ranging from an average low of 2 mm in CD 9ae, to an average high of 24 mm reported in CD 8a.  Over 65 mm was reported in the Nipawin area.  Hail damage was reported in the Tisdale, Nipawin, Codette, Lake Lenore, Humboldt, and Bruno areas.  Damage from wind was reported in the Lake Lenore area, and damage from drought was reported in the Melfort area, where rain is needed.  Drowned out areas are starting to show up in barley and wheat fields in the Garrick area. 

There was heavy hail in the Tisdale area.  In the Nipawin area, the hail was small but it did quite a bit of damage on mature crops.  There was minor hail damage in the Codette area.  In the Lake Lenore area, there was severe hail damage to small areas.  Hail damage was spotty north of Humboldt.  In the Bruno area, hail was widespread with damage from 0% to 50%.

Topsoil moisture conditions on hay and pasture land improved slightly while declining on crop land slightly this past week.  Eighty-seven per cent of crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 93% last week.  Ninety per cent of hay and pasture land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 87% last week.

Wheat midge damaged crops in the Pleasantdale area and spraying is underway.  There are some leaf diseases in the Hoey area.

Haying operations are coming along with close to 80% of the 2008 crop baled or silaged.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Many reporters do not expect a second cut in their area.


North western Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 9aw & 9b)

The north western region was cool, damp, and windy this past week.  An average of 19 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of 14 mm reported in CD 9aw, to an average high of 23 mm reported in CD 9b.  Over 50 mm was reported in the Dorintosh area.  Crop damage from flooding was reported in the Turtleford and Dorintosh areas.  Hail damage was reported in the Debden and Glaslyn areas.  Wind damage was reported in the North Battleford area, heat damage in the Duck Lake area, and drought damage was reported in the Neilburg and St. Walburg areas.  Rain is needed for crops and pastures in these dry areas.  Night-time temperatures dipped to 3ºC in the Medstead area last Thursday night.

Hail damage in the Debden area was estimated at 30%.  Hail was spotty in the North Battleford area.  In the Glaslyn area hail damage was estimated at 20% to 40%.

Crops are up to 10 days behind in maturity.

Topsoil moisture conditions declined during the past week, with 71% of the crop land and 73% of the hay and pasture land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 88% and 87% respectively last week.

Wheat midge caused crop damage in the Hafford and Leask areas.  Grasshoppers are showing up in the Duck Lake and Debden areas.  Mould was a problem in the Rapid View area.

Sixty per cent of the hay crop has been baled or silaged, and a further 21% is lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Hay is losing quality as it can't be cut at its optimum.  Second growth is coming up through the hay swaths in the Rapid View area.  Many reporters do not expect to see a second cut in their area.


Saskatchewan Harvest Progress at August 3, 2008

 

% In Swath or Ready to Str.Cmb.

% Combined

      Average  Average
 200820072003-07200820072003-07
Winter wheat4221612118
Spring wheat031000
Durum072001
Oats021010
Barley042011
Fall rye8282203624
Triticale5116013
Flax000000
Canola0125000
       
Mustard0218042
Sunflowers031000
Lentils029120167
Peas2211102611
Canary seed010000
Chickpeas052021
Total094042

 

Growing Degree Days Above 5ºC
calculations based on temperatures given by crop reporters
R.M.Since April 1 Jul 27-Aug 2Total
3903.5 119.51023
17A803*100.5903.5
43A948.85 125.151074
43B  114.75 
44792.5*126.4918.9
681089.9 115.551205.45
72699.4*110809.4
73B806.5 110916.5
75B  113.9 
76A844.1*122.25966.35
78A724.5*99823.5
97883.485 109.2992.685
108  92 
109  94 
111A997.1* 997.1
124  89.85 
125  102.5 
127  98.75 
138  116.5 
141901.1*97.4998.5
151B786.85 101.15888
166872.5*105.5978
167805*93.5898.5
185  103.45 
190B  109.25 
193925.65* 925.65
204  112.5 
205  96.5 
221823.4*94.05917.45
222  108 
226  95 
246740 92.25832.25
271744*86.5830.5
276  85.5 
277808.3*96.4904.7
283845.4*100.35945.75
285932.6 104.41037
312  87.4 
318A803.5*82.5886
333  88 
336  97 
339769 88.75857.75
340A  87 
343954.25 102.81057.05
370761*99860
379760.85*82.05842.9
397  86.5 
429B802*95897
442772 81853
456649.5 75.5725
488  88.25 
496733*88.5821.5
502828 88.5916.5
     
* missing 1 to 7 days of data  
A degree day is defined as a measure of the departure of temperature for a day from some reference temperature. They are expressed in degrees of temperature. For plant growth, a base of 5ºC is generally used, although the base varies for each plant species and, in fact, varies throughout the life of the plant from germination to maturity.  By accumulating degree days throughout the growing season, it is possible to forecast harvesting dates.


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