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      Friday, December 15, 2017
One Year Ago
Seven per cent of the 2007 crop had been combined, and 15 per cent had been swathed or was ready to straight combine.
Harvest operations were most advanced in the southwest where 21 per cent of the crop had been combined.
Ninety-four per cent of the first-cut hay crop and 18 per cent of the second-cut had been baled or made into silage.

One per cent of the 2008 crop has been combined, and three per cent has been swathed or is ready to straight combine, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly crop report.

The five-year (2003-07) average is four per cent combined and eight per cent swathed or ready to straight combine at this time of year.

Harvest operations are the most advanced in the southwest, where almost three per cent of the crop is in the bin, followed by the southeast, with one per cent combined.  Provincially, the fall rye and winter wheat crops are at six per cent combined, peas are at seven per cent complete and one per cent of the lentils are off.

Insects and heat and drought stress were the main sources of crop damage during the past seven days.  Some severe weather rolled through the southwest on Sunday, August 10.  The impact of those storms will be assessed in the next crop report.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop, hay and pasture land declined from last week and are reported as adequate on 54 to 62 per cent of the area.  The southwest and west-central regions report the highest percentage of very short moisture conditions.

Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation
August 25 - Deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat


South eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 1, 2, & 3ase)

The south eastern region was warm and dry last week.  An average of 3 mm of precipitation was reported, with an average high of 9 mm, reported in Crop District (CD) 1a.  Hail damage was reported in the Frobisher (light), Oxbow (light) and Stoughton (heavy) areas.  Wind damage was reported in the Frobisher, Stoughton and Montmartre areas.  Heat and drought stress was reported in the Lampman, Stoughton, Grenfell, Indian Head, and Minton areas.  Some crops lodged in the Moosomin area.                

One per cent of the 2008 south eastern crop has been combined and 3% is lying in the swath or is ready to be straight-combined. Almost one per cent of the crop has either been made into livestock feed or will not be harvested because of damage.  Fall crops are furthest ahead with 9% of the winter wheat and 10% of the fall rye crop combined.   Other combining progress includes 1% of the barley and 5% of the peas.  In the Zehner area, most fields have crops in multiple stages of development making for future harvesting challenges. 

South eastern crop yields are expected to be the highest in the province for chickpeas, and the lowest for field peas.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland declined this past week.  Sixty-five per cent of the crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 74% last week.  Conditions also declined on hay and pasture land, with 55% of land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 71% last week.  Rain is badly needed in the Moose Jaw area. 

Grasshoppers caused crop damage in many areas in the region, and some spraying is underway.  Other insects causing damage include aphids (Glenavon, Montmartre) and Bertha armyworms (Montmartre).    Disease pressure came from glume blotch (Moosomin), tan spot (Kennedy), alternaria black spot (Montmartre), and rust (Odessa).  Gophers continued to cause damage in the Moosomin area.  Wild oats were a problem in the Kennedy area.  The Odessa area is being overrun with crickets.         

An average yield of 1.03 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay on dry land in the south eastern region of the province.

Farmers are desiccating and cutting greenfeed.  A shortage of Reglone was reported in the Weyburn area.


 South western Saskatchewan
(CDs 3asw, 3an, 3b, & 4)

In the southwest, it was generally hot, dry, and windy this past week.  An average of 5 mm of precipitation was reported, with an average high of 12 mm reported in CD 4a.  Heat and drought stress was reported across the region, and crop yields have been negatively affected.  Wind damage was reported in the Bengough, Vanguard, and Tyner areas.  Hail damage was reported in the Bengough, Mossbank, Admiral, and Blumenhof areas      

Almost 3% of the 2008 south western crop has been combined and a further 6% is lying in the swath or is ready to be straight-combined.  Almost one per cent of the crop has either been made into livestock feed or will not be harvested because of damage.  Fall crops are furthest ahead with 13% of the winter wheat crop and 9% of the fall rye crop combined.  Other combining progress includes 2% of the lentils and 15% of the peas.  In the Ponteix area, some crops are a month away from harvest as they grow back after being hailed. 

South western crop yields are expected to be the lowest in the province for spring wheat, durum, oats, barley, triticale, flax, canola, mustard, lentils, and chickpeas.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land declined this past week, with 39% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 46% last week.  Conditions also declined on hay and pasture land, with 24% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 34% last week.  Rain is needed in the Limerick, Cadillac, Gravelbourg, Moose Jaw, and Lucky Lake areas.  Farmers are hauling water in the Orkney area.     

Grasshoppers caused crop damage across the region.  Reporters also cited damage from sawflies (Success, Consul) and reported that some swathing is underway.  Gophers continued to cause crop damage in the Fife Lake, Bengough, Lisieux, Rockglen, Glentworth, Mankota, and Webb areas.  Some pea crops are rotting in the Gull Lake area where there was moderate to severe hail damage.          

An average yield of 1.14 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay in the south western region of the province.

Desiccation is underway.  Reglone is sold out in the Swift Current - Gull Lake area.


East central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 5 & 6a)

The east central region saw warm, humid weather during the past week.  An average of 2 mm of precipitation was reported, with an average high of 3 mm reported in CD 5a.  Hail damage was reported in the Saltcoats and Lintlaw areas.  Wind damage was reported in the Humboldt and Meacham areas.  Drought damage was reported in the Craik and Leroy areas.     

Less than one half of one per cent of the 2008 east central crop has been combined and close to one half of one per cent is lying in swath or is ready to be straight-combined.  Fall crops are furthest ahead with 2% of the winter wheat combined.   One per cent of the peas have been combined.  Just over one half of one per cent of the crop has either been made into livestock feed or will not be harvested because of damage. 

East central yields are expected to be the highest in the province for winter wheat, triticale, flax, sunflowers, and peas.  Reporters continue to mention that the crops are up to two weeks behind in development.     

Topsoil has dried, with less of the crop, hay and pasture land rated as having surplus topsoil moisture this week and more rated as having short topsoil moisture.  Rain is needed in the Bethune area, especially for the later-seeded crops.  In the Leroy area, the lack of rain, combined with shallow-rooted crops has made visible crop damage on many fields.  Some oat fields in the area may have low bushel weights.        

Insect damage this past week came from aphids (Saltcoats, Quill Lake), diamondback moth larvae (Quill Lake), grasshoppers (Lumsden), Lygus bugs (Leroy), and sawflies (Leroy).  Diseases included tan spot (Quill Lake) and unspecified (Young,).

An average yield of 1.34 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay across the east central region of the province.

Desiccation of some crops has begun.


West central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 6b & 7) 

The west central region was hot and breezy this past week, with some showers.  An average of 5 mm of precipitation was reported, with an average high of 6 mm reported in CD 6b.  Damage from heat and drought stress was reported across the region.  Some crops are burning in the Tramping Lake area.  More rain is needed in several areas.  Hail damage was reported in the Grandora (15 to 20%), Kerrobert (light), and Luseland areas.  The Luseland area storm took the same path as a storm that went through the area a week ago.  Wind damage was reported in the Cando area.  Wind and rain lodged crops in the Grandora area.     

Less than one half of one per cent of the 2008 west central crop has been combined and a further 3% is lying in the swath or is ready to be straight-combined.  Fall crops are furthest ahead with 1% of the fall rye and winter wheat crops combined.  One per cent of the lentils have been combined.  About one half of one per cent of the crop has either been made into livestock feed or will not be harvested because of damage.  Reporters still mention that the crops are up to 10 days behind.   

West central yields are expected to be the highest in the province for canary seed, and the lowest for winter wheat, fall rye, and sunflowers.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland declined, with 49% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 62% last week.  Conditions also declined on hay and pasture land, with 43% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 54% last week.  Pastures are becoming quite dry.   

Insect damage came from diamondback moth larvae (Outlook), Bertha armyworms (Hanley), grasshoppers (Rosetown, Harris, Herschel, Biggar), and aphids (Conquest, Biggar).  Mildew and some unspecified disease caused damage in the Hanley area.

An average yield of 0.86 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay across the west central region of the province, the lowest regional average.

Desiccation of pulse crops is underway.  Farmers are also making silage, cutting greenfeed, hauling bales, summerfallowing, repairing bins, and preparing equipment for harvest.  A lightning storm on Friday started an abandoned farm yard on fire in the Unity area.


 North eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 8 & 9ae)

The north eastern region was warm and sunny during the past week, with some wind.  An average of 1 mm of precipitation was reported.  Wind damage was reported in the Arbourfield area.  Drought stress was reported in the Tisdale, Humboldt, and Melfort areas, and yields have been negatively affected.  Rain would help fill the kernels.   

Less than one half of one per cent of the 2008 north eastern crop has been combined, swathed or is ready to straight combine.  Fall crops are furthest ahead with 6% of the fall rye and 1/2% of the winter wheat crops combined.  Less than one half of one per cent of the crop has either been made into livestock feed or will not be harvested because of damage.  Reporters continue to indicate that crops are one to two weeks behind.     

North eastern yields are expected to be the highest in the province for durum, oats, barley, fall rye, triticale, canola, mustard, and lentils, and the lowest for canary seed.  Oats are expected to have light bushel weights in the Tisdale area due to dry weather.    

Topsoil moisture conditions declined this past week, with 71% of the crop land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 89% last week.  Hay and pasture land is rated as 68% having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 90% last week.

Alfalfa has been sprayed for bugs in the Nipawin area, and there has been some spraying for Bertha armyworms in the Paddockwood area.       

An average yield of 1.39 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay across the north eastern region of the province.  This is the highest regional average reported in the province.  

Crop desiccation has started.


 North western Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 9aw & 9b)

The northwest was warm and wet this past week.  An average of 18 mm of precipitation was reported across the region, ranging from an average low of 12 mm reported in CD 9aw, to an average high of 22 mm reported in CD 9b.  Over 60 mm was reported in the Meadow Lake area where crops were lodged.  Hail damage was reported in the Hafford, Neilburg, Glaslyn, and Turtleford areas.  Damage from wind and rain was reported in the Spiritwood area, and wind damage was reported in the North Battleford and Rapid View areas.  The Duck Lake and St. Walburg areas had some damage from heat stress and lack of moisture.     

No combining has started in the northwest.  Reporters continue to indicate that crops are up to two weeks behind.  Warm, dry weather is needed in northern areas where the rain was the heaviest so crops will not lodge and the ground will be able to support machinery.   

North western yields are expected to be the highest in the province for spring wheat.            

Topsoil moisture conditions improved with last week's rains.  Seventy-nine per cent of crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 71% last week.  Seventy-five per cent of the hay and pasture land is reported as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 72% last week.   

Mould caused crop damage in the Rapid View area.  Grasshoppers are damaging pastures in the Duck Lake area and crops in the North Battleford area.              

An average yield of 1.06 tons per acre was reported for brome/alfalfa hay across the north western region of the province.

Crop desiccation has begun.


 

Saskatchewan Harvest Progress at August 10, 2008

 

% In Swath or Ready to Str.Cmb.

% Combined

 

Average

Average

 

2008

2007

2003-07

2008

2007

2003-07

Winter wheat

14

29

19

6

35

36

Spring wheat

1

8

5

0

1

1

Durum

0

13

6

0

2

1

Oats

0

4

3

0

1

1

Barley

1

10

6

0

4

2

Fall rye

43

24

23

6

53

39

Triticale

3

25

12

0

13

9

Flax

0

1

1

0

0

0

Canola

1

25

13

0

2

1

Mustard

2

27

15

0

14

7

Sunflowers

0

0

1

0

0

0

Lentils

12

34

19

1

33

15

Peas

13

22

16

7

40

22

Canary seed

0

5

2

0

0

0

Chickpeas

0

11

5

0

6

4

   Total

3

15

8

1

7

4

 

Growing Degree Days Above 5ºC
calculations based on temperatures given by crop reporters

R.M.

Since April 1

Aug 3 - 10

Total

3

1023

114

1137

17A

903.5*

109

1012.5

38

 

113.5

 

43A

1074

122.8

1196.8

44

918.9*

127.5

1046.4

68

1205.45

114.75

1320.2

72

809.4*

99.85

909.25

73B

916.5*

 

916.5

75B

 

112.45

 

76A

966.35*

115.85

1082.2

78A

823.5*

111.5

935

97

992.685

103.9

1096.585

108

 

101.5

 

111A

997.1*

112

1109.1

123

 

93

 

124

 

87.7

 

125

 

93.5

 

127

 

95.85

 

138

 

120.5

 

141

998.5*

107.3

1105.8

151B

888

98.75

986.75

166

978*

100

1078

167

898.5*

97.5

996

186

 

88.35

 

190B

 

108.3

 

193

925.65*

110.8

1036.45

221

917.45*

95.15

1012.6

222

 

103.5

 

246

832.25

88.5

920.75

259

 

100.4

 

271

830.5*

83.5

914

277

904.7*

90.55

995.25

283

945.75*

100.15

1045.9

285

1037

101.8

1138.8

318A

886*

92.5

978.5

336

 

100

 

339

857.75

90.25

948

340A

 

88

 

343

1057.05*

1.55

1058.6

370

860*

98

958

379

842.9*

93.9

936.8

397

 

88.5

 

429B

897*

101

998

442

853

91.5

944.5

456

725

80.5

805.5

488

 

90.1

 

496

821.5*

107.5

929

502

916.5

101.5

1018

 

 

 

 

* missing 1 to 7 days of data

 

 

A degree day is defined as a measure of the departure of temperature for a day from some reference temperature.
They are expressed in degrees of temperature.
For plant growth, a base of 5ºC is generally used, although the base varies for each plant species and, in fact, varies throughout the life of the plant from germination to maturity.  By accumulating degree days throughout the growing season, it is possible to forecast harvesting dates. 

 



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