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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago
One per cent of the 2008 crop had been combined and three per cent had been swathed or was ready to straight combine. Flooding, lodging and hail caused crop damage as storms rolled through much of the province

 

One per cent of the 2009 crop has been combined, and seven per cent has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

The five-year average (2004-2008) is four per cent combined and eight per cent swathed or ready to straight-combine at this time of year.

Harvest operations are most advanced in the southwestern and southeastern regions of the province. In the southwest, four per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the fall rye, field peas and lentils have been combined. In the southeast, three per cent of the winter wheat, four per cent of the fall rye and two per cent of the lentils have been combined.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 71 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and four per cent very short, while hay and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 57 per cent adequate, 35 per cent short and eight per cent very short.

Rain slowed haying operations in some areas.

Grasshoppers, pea aphids and dry conditions are causing the majority of crop damage. Lodging of crops occurred in some areas due to heavy rains and high winds.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, cutting greenfeed, hauling grain, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest. The past week brought fairly good growing conditions to most of the province, although rain is needed in some areas to help fill the crops.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Temperatures were generally warm, resulting in good growing conditions for the crops.  Most of the region received rain; some areas more so than others.  CD 1A averaged 9 mm; CD 1B, 21 mm; CD 2A, 11 mm; CD 2B, 22 mm; and CD 3ASE, 9 mm. Many areas received above 20 mm of rain, while a few areas received only trace amounts. The Windthorst area received 40 mm; the Odessa area received 38 mm. The Manor area received 3 mm; the Moosomin and Weyburn areas, 5 mm. The Indian Head area recorded the largest amount of rain received this year: 34 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved significantly from last week. Conditions are being reported as 67 per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and four per cent very short on cropland. Hay and pasture land topsoil moisture conditions are 50 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and six per cent very short. Topsoil moisture conditions in CD 2A are slightly worse than in the rest of the region. On cropland, conditions are 61 per cent adequate, 27 per cent short and 11 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions in this CD are 48 per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and 13 per cent very short.

Harvest has just begun. One per cent of the winter wheat has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine and three per cent is combined. Four per cent of the fall rye has been combined, while 43 per cent is swathed or ready to straight-combine. Two per cent of the region's lentils have been combined and one per cent of the field peas are swathed. CDs 1A and 2B are the most advanced in harvest operations.

Haying operations are wrapping up in most areas, and greenfeed and barley silage is being cut. Haying in the Broadview area is about 50 per cent complete. The moisture delayed haying for a little while. 

Grasshoppers, pea aphids, gophers and dry conditions caused the majority of the crop damage. Barley thrips were reported in the Indian Head and Moosomin areas. Some lodging of crops occurred in areas that experienced heavy rains and strong winds. Gophers are also causing damage in isolated areas in the region. There are some crops in CD 1B that are under severe stress due to dry conditions.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest. Rain and heat would be nice to help fill crops and allow continued growth in pastures. Many producers are reporting that it will be one to two weeks before combines are in full swing.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

The southwest was generally cool, with scattered rain showers. The thermometer began to rise towards the end of the week. Showers have helped fill crops. CD 3ASW averaged 13 mm; CD 3AN, 17 mm; CD 3BS, 5 mm; CD 3BN, 17 mm; CD 4A, 6 mm and CD 4B, 4 mm. The areas around Stewart Valley and Kyle received 36 and 37 mm, respectively. The Beechy area received 39 mm. A few areas received only trace amounts, and some areas around Shaunavon received nothing. The rain helped to alleviate some fire hazards.

Harvest is underway, with four per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the fall rye combined. Eleven per cent of the winter wheat and 47 per cent of the fall rye is swathed or ready to straight-combine. Two per cent of the lentils and field peas have been combined, while 11 per cent of the lentils and 20 per cent of the peas are swathed or ready to straight-combine. Six per cent of the mustard has been swathed, and just under one per cent has been combined. CDs 3BN and 4A are the furthest advanced in harvest operations.

Topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture was reported as 63 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and eight per cent very short.  Topsoil moisture conditions on hay land and pasture are rated as 44 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 16 per cent very short.   

Haying operations are wrapping up, although there is still some hay to cut and bale.

The majority of crop damage this past week was attributed to grasshoppers, gophers and dry conditions. Grasshoppers continue to cause most of the damage. Some pea and lentil

crops in CD 3ASW are quite short. Some rye crops in CD 3BS have been baled for feed. Durum and spring wheat should be swathed within one to two weeks. Grasshoppers are feeding on pea and lentil crops. Minimal hail damage was reported in the Beechy area. Pocket gophers are chewing off bale strings in the field.

Farmers are busy scouting fields, readying harvest equipment, swathing and desiccating crops, and hauling hay.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6A)

A welcome rain fell in most areas of the east-central region. Cool days made up the majority of last week's weather, but temperatures warmed up by Sunday and Monday. CD 6A had varied amounts of rain. CD 5A received an average of 26 mm; CD 5B, 28 mm and CD 6A, 16 mm. The Goodeve area received 44 mm; the Rama area, 47 mm; the Chamberlain/Bethune/Craven areas received between trace amounts and 4 mm of rain. Many areas received more than 20 to 30 mm.  

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve. The region's crop reporters are indicating cropland topsoil moisture as 88 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 77 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short and five per cent very short.

Most of the 2009 hay crop is wrapped up, but there was still some hay lying in swaths when the rain fell on Friday.

Six per cent of the winter wheat and nine per cent of the fall rye has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine. 

Crop damage was mostly attributed to grasshoppers and wind (lodging), most of which was reported from CD 6A.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest. The rain was beneficial in that it helped fill the crops, but now heat is needed to push things along. Many canola fields are still in bloom. The crops are showing some great potential, but a long fall is needed to get them in the bin. Most cereals are in the early milk stage, while others are just starting to turn. Producers are expected to start cutting their pulse crops in about two weeks in parts of the region. Some will be desiccating this week and next. 


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

The west-central area had cool, damp weather at the beginning of the week, but temperatures were warmer by the weekend.  All areas recorded moisture, but the amount was variable. CD 6B averaged 19 mm; CD 7A, 29 mm and CD 7B, 13 mm. The Hanley area received 41 mm; the Biggar and Herschel areas received 45 and 42 mm, respectively. Other areas around Biggar received 28 mm. The Kerrobert, Major and Sonningdale areas received 4 mm.

Haying operations are still ongoing as the recent rains and high humidity have slowed progress. Greenfeed cereals are being cut.

Average cropland moisture conditions have improved from last week, and are rated as 71 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and four per cent very short. Hay land and pasture is sitting at 64 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and three per cent very short.  

Four per cent of the winter wheat and nine per cent of the fall rye have been swathed or are ready to straight-combine.

Crop damage was caused mainly by dry conditions, grasshoppers and wind (lodging). Mildew is showing up in some pea crops.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields, preparing for harvest and hauling grain. Some pulse crops are being desiccated, while others are still quite green. Some cereals and oilseeds are still blooming. Some crops that received rain in the past few weeks have improved and show some potential. Some crops are quite short. Crops in CD 7B are reported to be in many different development stages, which will make harvest difficult.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

The northeast had generally good growing conditions during the past week, which helped advance the crops and continue the haying. Rain showers were spotty, with some areas receiving no rain to as much as 31 mm. CD 8A averaged 2 mm; CD 8B, 8 mm and CD 9AE, trace amounts. The Humboldt area received 31 mm and the Lake Lenore area, 14 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated from last week. Sixty-five per is reported as adequate and 34 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 56 per cent adequate and 44 per cent short.

Harvest has just started in the region, with 27 per cent of the fall rye swathed.

Haying operations are between two-thirds to 90 per cent complete. Some hay was down when the rains came, and its quality has been reduced somewhat.

Dry conditions were the primary cause of the crop damage reported. The recent rains have improved crop condition, but harvest is still two to three weeks behind schedule.  Heat is needed to fill crops and allow producers to get them off the field prior to the first frost. Most canola crops have finished blooming, and wheat crops are starting to turn.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The past week was great weather for haying and advancing crop development. Very little rain was received in the region, with the exception of a few areas. CD 9AW averaged 2 mm of moisture, while CD 9B received 8 mm on average. The Neilburg and Turtleford areas received 30 and 19 mm, respectively. Other areas around Neilburg received 16 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions deteriorated from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are reported as 64 per cent adequate, 32 per cent short and four per cent very short. The hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are reported as 57 per cent adequate, 35 per cent short and eight per cent very short.

There were no reports of harvest activity.

Haying operations are continuing.

Grasshoppers and dry conditions caused the majority of the crop damage.

There are patches in canola crops still flowering. Crops look fairly good, but the backward growing season is delaying maturity and the number of frost-free days are limited. Farmers are busy haying, controlling grasshoppers and scouting fields. They need warm weather to get quality crops off the field and into the bin.


 



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