Government of Saskatchewan
Quick Search:
      Friday, December 15, 2017

One year ago
Three per cent of the 2008 crop had been combined and seven per cent had been swathed or was ready to straight combine. Eighteen per cent of the winter wheat, 25 per cent of the fall rye, 22 per cent of the peas, and nine per cent of the lentils had been combined.   

Just over three per cent of the 2009 crop has been combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Harvest progressed slowly last week, due to the rain and cool weather. The most rain fell in the Viceroy area, which received 212 mm. Many other areas received above 40 mm of rain.

Thirty-four per cent of the fall rye and 18 per cent of the winter wheat is ready to swath or straight-combine. Eleven per cent of the lentils and 10 per cent of the peas are swathed or ready to straight-combine.

Cropland topsoil moisture in the province is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, five per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as seven per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Haying operations have nearly wrapped up in most regions of the province.

Insects, flooding and hail caused the majority of crop damage. Grasshoppers and pea aphids caused the majority of the insect damage. Hail caused some damage in the southeastern part of the province.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, cutting greenfeed, hauling grain, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest.


South eastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

The week started off fairly warm, but changed to cool and rainy conditions by week's end.  Many areas received heavy rainfalls and experienced localized flooding. All crop reporters recorded moisture throughout the week. CD 1A averaged 33 mm; CD 1B, 43 mm; CD 2A, 57 mm; CD 2B, 45 mm and CD 3ASE, 64 mm. Many areas received more than 50 mm of rain. The Parry area received 83 mm. The Wilcox area received 79 mm. The Midale and Pangman areas received 70 and 77 mm, respectively. Other areas received less, the lowest being the Gainsborough and Carnduff areas, which received 17 and 19 mm, respectively.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved significantly from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are 10 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short. Hay and pasture land topsoil moisture conditions are five per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 15 per cent short.

Harvesting has not progressed much from last week. Fourteen per cent of the winter wheat has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine and 16 per cent has been combined. Two per cent of the barley is ready to swath or straight-cut. Thirty-two per cent of the fall rye has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine, and 18 per cent has been combined. Five per cent of the lentils and four per cent of the peas have been swathed or are ready to straight-cut. One per cent of the peas have been combined.

Haying operations are wrapping up in most areas and greenfeed and barley silage is being cut. The moisture has delayed haying. In some areas, bales are lying in water.

Insects, wind, hail and flooding were the causes of crop damage. Grasshoppers and pea aphids are feeding on crops. Sawfly damage is showing up in wheat and barley crops. There was hail and lodging in the Moosomin and Whitewood areas. The hail damage ranged from minimal to a total loss. With the recent moisture, moulds and mildews are starting to show up in peas and lentils. Flooding occurred in many areas in CD 2A and 2B.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest. The full swing of harvest is still one to two weeks behind normal. The moisture is there for most areas; now heat is needed to bring the crop to maturity.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

The week in the southwest started out quite hot, but cooled down ended with rain. CD 3ASW averaged 75 mm; CD 3AN, 49 mm; CD 3BS, 33 mm; CD 3BN, 20 mm; CD 4A, 30 mm and CD 4B, 15 mm. Rain gauges were over-flowing in the areas around Viceroy and Assiniboia, the result of an amazing 212 and 165 mm of rain, respectively, the majority of which fell on Friday night and Saturday morning. Many areas in the region received more than 50 mm of moisture. The Big Beaver and Spring Valley areas received 71 and 75 mm, respectively. The Shaunavon area received 67 mm; Outlook, 61 mm and Gull Lake, 33 mm. Some areas in CD 4A and 4B received less than 15 mm.

Harvest was stalled for most of the week as rain kept farmers out of the fields. Thirty-seven per cent of the winter wheat, 38 per cent of the fall rye, six per cent of the oats, 12 per cent of the triticale, two per cent of the canola, 10 per cent of the mustard, 20 per cent of the lentils, 31 per cent of the peas, two per cent of the chickpeas and four per cent of the barley have been swathed or are ready to straight-combine. Seven per cent of the winter wheat, 17 per cent of the fall rye, two per cent of the mustard, seven per cent of the lentils and nine per cent of the peas have been combined.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved significantly from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture was reported as nine per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate, seven per cent short and one per cent very short. Topsoil moisture conditions on hay and pasture land are rated as nine per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and one per cent very short.

Haying operations are beginning to wrap up, although there is still some hay in the sloughs waiting to be cut and baled. Some bales and swaths are sitting in water.

The majority of crop damage this past week was attributed to grasshoppers and flooding. Gophers are still causing damage in CDs 3ASW, 3BS and 3BN. Flooding occurred in the Lisieux, Viceroy, Assiniboia, Kincaid and Shaunavon areas. Some pea and lentil swaths rolled around with the high winds in the Lafleche area. There was some bleaching of peas and lentils that were desiccated prior to the rain. The heavy rain has laid some pulse crops down, which will make them difficult to pick up come harvest.

Farmers are busy scouting fields and readying harvest equipment, swathing and desiccating crops, and hauling hay. The moisture situation is good in most areas; now heat is needed to continue with harvest and bring crops to maturity.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6A)

The week started off fairly decently with moderate growing conditions. Rain and cool temperatures were experienced by the end of the week. CD 5A received an average of 43 mm of rain; CD 5B, 45 mm and CD 6A, 38 mm. The Goodeve area received 66 mm; the Kelvington area, 55 mm; the Bradwell area, 67 mm; the Langenburg area, 23 mm and the Chamberlain area, 30 mm. Most areas in the region received more than 30 mm of moisture.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve. One-quarter of the region's cropland has surplus topsoil moisture and 71 per cent has adequate moisture. Only four per cent of the cropland is short or very short of moisture. Hay and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 11 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, five per cent short and three per cent very short.

Swathing of winter wheat has started and peas are being desiccated. Eight per cent of the winter wheat, 20 per cent of the fall rye and two per cent of the mustard has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine.

Haying is continuing.

Crop damage was mostly attributed to flooding, wind (lodging) and grasshoppers. Flooding occurred in some areas of every crop district in the region. The Foam Lake area received hail, which damaged some crops.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest. Heat is needed to push things along. The crops are showing some great potential. About three weeks of warm, dry weather is needed to get the majority of the crop in the bin. The cool, wet week did little to advance crop maturity.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

The west-central area had cool, damp weather throughout most of the week. All areas recorded some moisture. CD 6B averaged 70 mm; CD 7A, 46 mm and CD 7B, 49 mm. The Arelee and Sonningdale areas received 117 and 116 mm, respectively. The Rosetown area received 71 mm and the Biggar area, 85 mm. Most areas received more than 40 mm. The rain will be good for pastures and for next year's crop.

Average cropland moisture conditions have improved from last week, putting 11 per cent of the region's cropland in a surplus situation. Eighty-three per cent of the cropland has adequate topsoil moisture, and five per cent is short or very short of moisture. Hay land and pasture is 15 per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate, six per cent short and one per cent very short.

Desiccation of peas and lentils has started. Seventeen per cent of the winter wheat, 26 per cent of the fall rye, six per cent of the lentils and two per cent of the peas has been swathed or is ready to straight-cut.

Haying operations are finishing up. The rain did not come at a good time for hay lying in the swath.

Crop damage consisted mostly of flooding, lodging and grasshoppers. Hail was reported in the Biggar and Smiley areas.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields, preparing for harvest and hauling grain. Some canola fields are still blooming. Several weeks of good, warm weather is needed to get the crop off in good condition. The week's weather slowed the advancement of crop maturity.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

The week was generally cool and wet. CD 8A averaged 57 mm of rain; CD 8B, 46 mm and CD 9AE, 50 mm. The Porcupine Plain area received 94 mm, the Humboldt area received 77 mm, and the Garrick area received 59 mm. Other areas received less, the lowest being the Melfort and Lake Lenore areas, which received 2 and 28 mm, respectively.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions have improved from last week. Eleven per of cropland has a surplus and 89 per cent has an adequate supply. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 93 per cent adequate, three per cent short and two per cent very short.

Desiccating of pulses should start this coming week. Fifty-five per cent of the fall rye has been swathed or is ready to straight-combine.

Haying operations are nearing completion. Hay that was not picked up before the rain has had its quality reduced. The moisture was welcomed for continued pasture growth.

Wind (lodging) and flooding were the major causes of the crop damage reported this week. Flooding occurred in the Humboldt and Garrick areas. Some fall rye that was swathed prior to the rain has started to sprout. Harvest is still two to three weeks behind schedule. Heat is needed to fill crops and allow producers to get them off the field prior to the first frost. Most canola crops have finished blooming and wheat and barley crops are starting to turn.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The week was generally cool and rainy. CD 9AW averaged 48 mm of moisture, while CD 9B received 13 mm on average. Some areas did not receive any rain. The Radisson and Hafford areas received 94 mm. The North Battleford area received 81 mm and the St. Walburg area, 15 mm. The Barthel, Meadow Lake, Dorintosh, Rapid View and Pierceland areas did not receive any moisture.

Topsoil moisture conditions improved from last week. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are reported as 88 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and three per cent very short. The hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are reported as 80 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and four per cent very short.

Harvest has just begun, with 43 per cent of the fall rye swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Haying is estimated to be 85 to 90 per cent complete. Many greenfeed crops are still standing.

Grasshoppers, wind (lodging) and hail caused the majority of the crop damage. Hail was reported in the Duck Lake area. Grasshoppers are causing damage in the Meadow Lake, Dorintosh and Pierceland areas. Lodging is occurring, mostly in oat and barley crops.

There are patches in canola crops still flowering. Crops look fairly good, but the cool growing season is delaying maturity and the number of frost-free days is dwindling. Farmers are busy haying, controlling grasshoppers and scouting fields. Warm weather is increasingly needed to get quality crops off the field and into the bin.




Home/About Agriculture/Information Services/Crop Report /Crop Report 2009/Crop Report for the Period August 11 to 17, 2009
© 2017 Government of Saskatchewan. All rights reserved.