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       Monday, October 23, 2017

The rain that fell this week could not have come at a better time for many Saskatchewan farmers, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

The moisture is particularly welcome in the western half of the province, which has been very dry for the past two years.  The moisture situation on the east side of the province is sufficient to get the crop up and off to a good start.  Some areas received rain on Monday, but the majority of it fell on Tuesday and Wednesday and will be reflected in next week's report.

Crop reporters have indicated that there will be a decrease in the number of acres sown to durum, oats, barley and flax compared to last year.  Lentils, canola, canaryseed, mustard and chickpeas will see an increase.

There are reports of farmers in the south, south-east and south-west beginning to seed.

Due to the slow snow melt, the southwest and west central areas of the province are reporting little runoff.  Some areas in the central and northern regions are indicating that dugouts have been filled.

The severe wind last Friday, which reached 130 km per hour in places, damaged roofs, corrals, quonsets, bins and trees, and caused some soil-drift.  Some areas had snow along with the extreme wind, causing blizzard-like conditions.

Farmers are busy with pre-seeding field work, cleaning seed, drying grain, moving cattle to pasture, calving and fencing.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

The recent rain is a welcome sight for pastures, hayland and cropland. The moisture should get crops off to a good a start.

The slow snow melt resulted in lower-than-anticipated spring run-off.  Dugouts are full in the Vibank area.

Crop reporters indicated that some farmers are still working on seeding plans, trying to figure out what is the best crop to grow in rotation and that will bring some profit.

Many bins, roofs, trees and farm buildings were damaged by the wind storm. The power was out in the Indian Head area for five hours last Friday. The March weather co-operated nicely with spring calving

Crop reporters indicated that the majority of farmers are still two weeks away from seeding.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Farmers and ranchers are enjoying the much-needed recent rain.  Soil moisture in the fall was poor for the most part. The region received up to 10 mm of rain, with the Mossbank area receiving the most. The area was also under a snow warning on April 14. The moisture results will be discussed in next week's report.

Some farmers have just started pre-seed field work, primarily applying ethalfluralin and picking rocks. There were reports of a few farmers starting to seed.

Water levels in dugouts and behind dams are very low due to the lack of spring run-off. The wind last Friday reached up to 130 km/hr in the Kyle area, causing damage to houses, bins, farm buildings and trees.

Crop reporters predict it will be at least seven to 10 days before farmers start seeding, depending on moisture conditions.

For the southern crop districts, crop reporters are indicating the following crops will  decrease in acreage: durum (-17 per cent), oats (-two per cent), barley (-one per cent) and flax (-eight per cent). Crop reporters are indicating the following crops will increase in acreage: spring wheat (+five per cent), triticale (+four per cent), canola (+10 per cent), mustard (+four per cent), lentils (+13 per cent), canaryseed (+seven per cent), chickpeas (+three per cent) and field peas (+one per cent).


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Last fall, soil moisture situations were good to very good for the majority of the region, except in Crop District 6A, which varied from poor to very good. Crop reporters are indicating that the snow accumulation over winter was average to below-average. Spring run-off was below average. Still, most farmers are indicating that there is enough moisture to get the crop off to a good start.

Farmers are busy preparing equipment, finishing up fall field work that was left incomplete due to the late harvest, calving, cleaning seed and doing some pre-seed preparations.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Some areas of the region received much-needed snow and rain last week. CD 6B averaged 7 mm, CD 7A averaged 4 mm and CD 7B averaged 12 mm. The Perdue area received 15 mm and the Biggar area received 10 mm. The Cando, Denzil and Tramping Lake areas received 22, 20 and 19 mm, respectively. The moisture results from this week will be discussed in next week's report. Due to the very dry conditions, more moisture is needed prior to seeding to get crops off to a good start. Below-average snowfall resulted in virtually no spring run-off. The water level in dugouts is very low.

Farmers are preparing for seeding, applying fertilizer, cleaning seed, moving grain and calving. The strong winds and snow caused a few calf losses, as well as damaging farm buildings. A couple of grass fires were reported in the Biggar area.

Seeding is expected to commence around the last week in April.

For the central crop districts, crop reporters are indicating the following crops will decrease in acreage: spring wheat and oats (-three per cent), durum (-18 per cent), barley (-four per cent) and flax (-eight per cent).  Crop reporters are indicating the following crops will increase in acreage: canola (+seven per cent), lentils (+12 per cent), canaryseed (+six per cent) and chickpeas (+two per cent). 


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Farmers and ranchers in the northeastern region went into the winter with good to very good soil moisture. Soil moisture is sufficient for germination and emergence. Water is still running in some areas, but, for the most part, spring run-off is now complete. Crop reporters have indicated that the soil in some areas is saturated.

Farmers are calving, readying machinery and cleaning grain. Most field work has yet to begin. There are a few crops still left out from last fall, mostly barley and oats. The extreme wind last Friday caused damage to houses and farm buildings.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Farmers and ranchers are happy to have received the recent moisture. The Spiritwood area received 14 mm of moisture, the Rapid View area received 24 mm, the Glaslyn, Meadow Lake and Dorintosh areas received 16 mm of moisture. There is still a little bit of snow left in the tree lines and sloughs. Spring work as began in the field, mainly harrowing and rock picking. A few farmers are harvesting last year's crop that was left out over winter.

The high wind and snow last Friday caused damage to houses and farm buildings, and some calf losses were reported. Over 100 mm of snow fell in the Turtleford area. The wind created 60 to 90 cm high banks of snow in some areas. Spring run-off is below normal. The mild March weather aided calving.

Farmers are busy readying equipment, calving, moving grain and cleaning seed.

For the northern crop districts, crop reporters are indicating the following crops will decrease in acreage: spring wheat (-one per cent), durum (-four per cent), oats (-five per cent) and flax (-seven per cent). Crop reporters in the region are indicating the following crops will increase in acreage: canola (+five per cent) and lentils (+one per cent).


Related Documents
Crop Report 1.pdf  ( 920.9 KB )
Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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