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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago
Four per cent of the 2009 crop had been seeded. The five year average (2005 - 2009) for this time of year is six per cent complete.

Saskatchewan farmers have two per cent of the 2010 crop in the ground. Seeding progress has halted due to rain and snow, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report. Nine per cent of the peas, five per cent of the lentils and two per cent of the spring wheat have been seeded.

Across the province, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 34 per cent surplus, 65 per cent adequate, one per cent short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and four per cent short. 

The recent moisture has given many areas in the province adequate or surplus topsoil moisture conditions. The west-central region is reporting topsoil moisture conditions on cropland as 12 per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and three per cent short. The north-eastern region is indicating 80 per cent surplus and 20 per cent adequate. 

The rain and snow has provided needed moisture to the western side of the province, but has delayed seeding progress.

Crop reporters are indicating nine per cent of the winter wheat and four per cent of the fall rye seeded last fall has been winterkilled.

Farmers and ranchers are busy calving, preparing machinery for seeding and waiting to get back into the field.


Southeastern Saskatchewan  (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

 SE region
Crop % seeded
(May 4, 2010)
Spring wheat  4
Durum 2
Canola 3
Mustard 3
Lentils 4
Peas 14

The region has approximately three per cent of the 2010 crop in the ground. Crop districts 1A and 3ASE have six and 12 per cent of the crop seeded, respectively. An average of 29 mm of rain fell on the area during the week.  The Stoughton area received 49 mm, the Moosomin area 53 mm, Indian Head 45 mm and the Ceylon area received 37 mm. Both rain and snow fell in the region during the week.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are 27 per cent surplus, 70 per cent adequate and three per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 88 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.  CDs 1A and 3ASE have the lowest topsoil moisture levels of all the districts in the region.  

Approximately seven per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the fall rye seeded last fall was winterkilled.

Farmers are appreciating the moisture, although sunny warm weather is needed to dry up the fields so they can get back to work. Pastures and hay land will definitely benefit from the moisture, once the sun comes out. Livestock producers are starting to take cattle to pasture. The wet weather has been a little hard on the newborn calves.  Up until the rain started to fall, farmers were busy picking rocks, controlling weeds, applying fertilizer and seeding.


 SW Region
Crop % seeded
(May 4, 2010)
Spring wheat 1
Durum 1
Canola 2
Mustard 6
Lentils 10
Peas 15

Southwestern Saskatchewan  (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Just over four per cent of the crop is seeded in the southwestern region. CDs 3BS and 3BN have close to six per cent of the crop in the ground, while CD 4B has nine per cent seeded. Rain across the region resulted in 34 mm of moisture on average. The Eastend, Fife Lake, Shaunavon and Coderre areas received just over 60 mm, the Webb area 43 mm and the Fox Valley area received 43 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved on cropland, and are now rated as 10 per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Hay land and pasture moisture conditions are 91 per cent adequate and nine per cent short. 

Approximately six per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye seeded last fall was winterkilled.

Some livestock producers are treating calves for scours caused by the wet and cold weather. The moisture is great for the pasture, but sun would be appreciated to get things growing. Most farmers are ready to begin or continue with seeding once the fields dry up. At least three to four days of drying weather is needed before farmers are back in the field.


EC Region
Crop % seeded
(May 4, 2010)
Spring wheat 3
Peas 7

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Farmers in the region have one per cent of the crop in the ground. The end of the week brought rain to most areas of the region. CD 5A received an average of 34 mm of rain, CD 5B 44 mm and CD 6A 38 mm.  Many areas received over 50 mm for the week. The Jedburgh area received 63 mm, and the Foam Lake and Elfros areas received over 70 mm.

Thanks to the past couple of weeks' moisture, 59 per cent of the cropland and 42 per cent of the hay land and pasture has surplus topsoil moisture.  With the fields saturated, it may require a week of drying weather before seeding and spring field work can continue. The rain during calving has livestock producers trying to keep newborn calves healthy.

Crop reporters are indicating that four per cent of the fall-seeded winter wheat and rye has been winterkilled. Because of last year's late harvest, there were not many acres seeded in the fall. The crop that is coming up seems to be in good condition.

Prior to the rain, farmers are busy applying fertilizer and starting to seed. Pasture and hay land is greening up better than last year at this time. Heat is needed to get the grass growing.   Due to the saturated ground, farmers are getting a little worried about when they will be able to be back in the field.


West-Central Saskatchewan  (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Two per cent of the region's peas have been seeded. The region received 30 mm of moisture on average. The Rosetown and Harris areas received 42 mm, the Cando area received 49 mm. Most other areas recorded over 20 mm of moisture in the form of either rain or snow.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve for the region, closing the gaps on the very dry areas.  Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 12 per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Pasture and hay land topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 12 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and six per cent short.

Of the fall-seeded crops, eight per cent of the winter wheat and six per cent of the fall rye has been winterkilled.

The cool and wet weather has delayed field work. The moisture is great for hay land and pasture, and will help fill dugouts, but it has made it difficult to haul cattle to pasture, and winter feed supplies are being pushed to the limit in some areas. The cooler weather has disrupted pre-seeding weed control.


Northeastern Saskatchewan  (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Most of the region's farmers have yet to begin seeding, although crop reporters have indicated that there are a few acres of peas in the ground. Saturated soil has kept most farmers out of the fields. The region received an average of 35 mm of moisture this week. CD 8A averaged 44 mm and CD 8B 34 mm. The Tisdale area received 61 mm and the Prince Albert area recorded 42 mm for the week. Rain and snow continue to fall. Some crop reporters are indicating a change in seeding intentions if wet weather persists. The moisture will benefit the hay land and pasture.

The region has surplus topsoil moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 80 per cent surplus and 20 per cent adequate.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is 70 per cent surplus and 30 per cent adequate.

Of the fall-seeded crops, five per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye was winterkilled.

Farmers are calving and getting ready to seed. Warm and dry weather is needed. Creek beds are full.


Northwestern Saskatchewan  (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Seeding had started in the region prior to the rain late last week. Approximately three per cent of the field peas are in the ground, and lentils were being seeded as well. The region received an average of 15 mm of moisture. The Leask area received 60 mm, the Neilburg area received 44 mm and the Pierceland area recorded 3 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to improve. Cropland conditions are 11 per cent surplus and 89 per cent adequate.  Pasture and hay land conditions are 10 per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  

Prior to the rain, farmers were busy readying equipment, calving, picking rocks, harrowing and applying fertilizer. Temperatures are still quite cool at night, dipping below zero. The moisture is appreciated, but warm sunny weather is needed before field work can start and pastures begin growing.


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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