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    Saturday, December 16, 2017

One year ago
Warm weather advanced crop development. Eleven per cent of the hay crop had been cut and yields were predicted to be below normal. Dry conditions were the main cause of crop damage.

Saskatchewan livestock producers have six per cent of the 2010 hay crop cut and one per cent baled, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. The majority of hay is rated as good to excellent. Thunderstorms, heavy rain and, in some areas, hail continue to cause crop damage. Leaf diseases are causing crop damage as well.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 48 per cent surplus, 51 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 31 per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate and one per cent short.

Crops are behind normal in development. Sixty-three per cent of the fall cereals are in the heading stage of development, compared to 70 per cent at this time last year. Forty-one and 33 per cent of the spring cereals are in the tillering and jointing stages, respectively. Forty-nine and 35 per cent of the flax is in the seedling and stem extension stages, respectively. Forty-seven per cent of the canola and mustard is in the rosette stage, compared to 54 per cent at this time last year. Sixty-six and 30 per cent of the pulses are in the vegetative and flowering stages, respectively, compared to 57 and 40 per cent at this time last year.  Crops across the province vary widely in development stages.

Crops are showing signs of stress due to the excess moisture; however, crops in areas that received little moisture last week have advanced nicely.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling crop diseases and weeds. Rain and wet fields continue to make field operations difficult.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Most of the region escaped large amounts of rain although heavy rain fell in some areas as thunderstorms rolled through the region. The Redvers area received 35 mm of rain, the Fillmore area 6 mm and the Moose Jaw area 25 mm.  

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are reported as 46 per cent surplus and 54 per cent adequate. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent surplus and 75 per cent adequate.   

Crop damage is mostly attributed to flooding. Flea beetles, cutworms and leaf diseases are causing damage as well.  Hail was reported in the Moose Jaw and Ceylon areas.  

Haying is underway and 10 per cent of the 2010 crop has been cut. One per cent is baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as good to excellent, and yields look good.  With the scattered rain throughout the area, many producers are not cutting too far ahead of the baler. The swaths have been slow to dry due to high humidity, wet ground and rain. 

More rain fell in the region during the week. High wind and hail were reported in areas. Crop staging varies throughout the region, depending on when the crop was seeded, land drainage and other weather stresses. Some stressed canola crops are very short and flowering.  Farmers are controlling crop diseases and weeds. Some fields are too advanced for weed control.  Aerial application is occurring in fields that will not support a ground application. Crop conditions look better in areas that did not receive any rain during the past week. Diamondback moth larvae have been spotted in canola fields, but do not seem to have reached economic thresholds yet.

Farmers are busy cutting hay, scouting crops and controlling weeds and diseases.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Thunderstorms and rain were reported across the majority of the region.  The Limerick area received 12 mm of rain, the Chaplin and Consul areas 20 mm, the Stewart Valley and Cadillac areas 38 mm, the Blumenhof area 22 mm and the Gull Lake area 41 mm. Most of the crop reporters from CDs 3BN and 4B recorded over 25 mm of rain.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved with the moisture during the week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 21 per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 14 per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate and three per cent short.

Crop damage has been caused by hail and flooding. Hail damage was reported in many communities across the region, including Eyebrow, Mankota, Shaunavon, Vanguard, Blumenhof, Webb, Stewart Valley, Swift Current, Eastend, Consul, Gull Lake and Hazlet. CD 3ASW was the only district that did not report hail damage.  Ascochyta blight, leaf diseases, gophers and root rot are causing crop damage as well.  

The region has seven per cent of the hay cut and two per cent baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as good to fair.  The hay crop looks good and farmers are expecting good yields. The unsettled weather has some people wondering if the crop will be put up in good condition. Hay is slow to dry due to high humidity, heavy swaths and rain showers. Strong winds in the Mankota area moved some hay swaths around the field.

Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling weeds and diseases. Farmers are traveling slowly when applying weed and disease control products due to ruts and wet areas in fields.  Crop staging varies within fields and from field to field.  With the recent warmth, some crops are recovering from excess moisture stress.  There were reports that some of the early-seeded crops look to be in better condition than the late-seeded crops.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Farmers continue to struggle with saturated soil conditions. During the past week, the region recorded between three and 143 mm of rain. The Rama area received 143 mm, which caused extensive flooding, swamped roads and overflowing culverts. Most areas in CDs 5A and 5B recorded above 25 mm of rain. The Yorkton area received 67 mm, and areas around Yorkton received considerably more rain, causing extensive flooding. The Elfross area received 77 mm of rain, the Churchbridge area 18 mm, the Earl Grey area 33 mm and the Bradwell area 27 mm. So far for this year, the region has received between 190 and 568 mm of rain. A tornado touched down in RM 279, destroying one farmyard and causing extensive damage to others.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as 68 per cent surplus and 32 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 51 per cent surplus and 49 per cent adequate.

Flooding continues to be the cause of the majority of crop damage. Hail damage was reported in all crop districts, including the communities of Churchbridge, Neudorf, Abernethy, Langenburg, Ituna, Rama, Wynyard and Lintlaw, Holdfast, Semans, Leroy and Bradwell. Leaf diseases, ascochyta blight and gophers are also causing crop damage. 

Haying has just started and two per cent of the hay crop has been cut. Quality is reported as fair to excellent depending on the extent of flooding damage to the fields. Hay crops in CD 6A look pretty good, but some are too wet to cut. Hay that is cut is slow to dry. CD 6A has a good hay crop as long as it can be put up in decent condition. Access to hay fields is becoming a growing concern. Sloughs are getting bigger and fields are saturated from the continued moisture.

There were reports of some farmers trying to seed oats for cattle feed, but the continuous rain has made it difficult. Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling weeds and diseases. There are many reports of high-clearance sprayers getting stuck. Cereals and canola crops in the Yorkton area are turning yellow from standing water. There is heavy weed growth on the unseeded fields that are too wet for control. Canola is blooming in some areas, but the stands are thin.  Most of the crop reporters in CD 6A are reporting crops are variable in condition. Some crops look not too bad depending on drainage and moisture received. The lentil and the flax crops seem to be suffering the most in this crop district.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Most of the region recorded rain during the past week. Most areas recorded more than 25 mm of rain. The Sonningdale area received 55 mm, the Hanley area 18 mm, the Biggar area 39 mm, the Kindersley area 12 mm, the Battleford area 65 mm and the Cando area 30 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 37 per cent surplus and 63 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 30 per cent surplus and 70 per cent adequate.

The majority of crop damage is due to flooding. Hail damage was reported in the Eston, Herschel, Biggar, Kerrobert and Unity areas. Leaf diseases, ascochyta blight, gophers and cutworms are also causing crop damage.

Haying operations are under way, with eight per cent of the 2010 hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as good to excellent. Some farmers are concerned about getting the hay crop put up in good condition. The hay is slow to dry due to rain, heavy swaths and high humidity.

Crops had progressed fairly nicely in the past two weeks, but the rain this past week has made fields difficult to work in again. There are reports of cattle still being fed in the yard as the roads to pastures are impassable. Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling weeds and disease. Some canola and cereal crops are thin due to excess moisture. Field conditions are getting worse as soil is saturated and there is no where for the rain to drain. There are areas where the crops look good, but sun and some warm weather is needed. Some farmers have top-dressed fertilizer on canola as the excess moisture has leached away some nutrients. Canada thistles, dandelions and sow thistles are problems in some fields.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

The week's rain dropped an extra 18 to 70 mm of precipitation on already-saturated fields. The Star City area received 56 mm of rain, the Nipawin area received 60 mm, the Vonda area 70 mm, the Melfort area 22 mm and the Prince Albert area 54 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 90 per cent surplus and 10 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 78 per cent surplus and 22 per cent adequate.

Crop damage is due to flooding.  Hail damage was reported in the communities of Porcupine Plain, Star City, Vonda and Prince Albert. Cutworms, wireworms and leaf diseases and root rot are causing damage as well.

Haying has just started.  Two per cent of the 2010 hay crop is on the ground and one per cent has been baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as good to excellent.  Farmers are concerned that much of the hay will not be put up in good condition if the rains continue.

High winds in the Porcupine Plain area knocked over bins and trees. Crops are patchy and continue to suffer from excess moisture. There are areas in fields that have flooded out in the past two weeks. Some soil erosion, compaction and washing away of crops has resulted from heavy rainfall. Crop conditions and development are quite variable, with many crops turning yellow. Farmers are spraying for weeds and diseases where they can get into the field. Some fields will not be sprayed due to wet conditions.  


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The region received between three and 52 mm of rain. The Radisson area received 52 mm, the Spiritwood area 22 mm, the Rapid View area 29 mm and the Neilburg area 8 mm. Some areas reported less than 11 mm of moisture.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are 26 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Pasture and hay land conditions are 15 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and three per cent short.

The majority of crop damage was caused by flooding. Hail damage was reported in the Hafford area. Cutworms and tan spot and other leaf disease are causing damage as well.

Haying has just begun, with three per cent cut. Quality is reported as good to excellent. Some livestock producers are reluctant to start cutting due to the unsettled weather. Hay yields look good; quality will be uncertain until more is baled. Pastures are looking good.

Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling weeds and diseases. Crops look pretty good for the most part, except in low areas that are flooded out or stressed from moisture. There are reports of some farmers seeding greenfeed. There are areas in the northern part of the region that could use some rain.


Saskatchewan Crop Development (per cent at each stage)

Spring Cereals

Emerge

Tillering

Jointed

Shot blade

Heading

July 5/10 prov avg

6

42

33

18

1

Southeast

8

40

30

19

3

Southwest

8

48

30

14

0

East central

5

41

33

18

3

West central

4

46

33

17

0

Northeast

2

40

36

20

2

Northwest

5

24

42

27

2

Flax

Emerge

Seedling

Stem ext

Flowering

Boll

July 5/10 prov avg

15

49

35

1

0

Southeast

15

49

35

1

0

Southwest

29

49

21

1

0

East central

15

52

33

0

0

West central

14

43

43

0

0

Northeast

3

40

56

1

0

Northwest

4

78

18

0

0

Canola & Mustard

Emerge

Seedling

Rosette

Flowering

Podding

July 5/10 prov avg

2

18

47

33

0

Southeast

5

18

45

32

0

Southwest

1

4

41

53

1

East central

2

22

46

30

0

West central

1

15

51

33

0

Northeast

2

21

51

26

0

Northwest

0

9

48

43

0

Pulse Crops

Pre-emerge

Emerge

Vegetative

Flowering

Podding

July 5/10 prov avg

0

4

66

30

0

Southeast

0

3

62

35

0

Southwest

0

5

55

40

0

East central

0

3

68

29

0

West central

0

4

82

14

0

Northeast

0

0

88

12

0

Northwest

0

0

57

43

0

Fall Cereals

Tillering

Jointed

Shot blade

Heading

Dough

July 5/10 prov avg

2

6

16

63

13

Southeast

5

6

18

64

7

Southwest

0

3

16

61

20

East central

2

11

14

68

5

West central

0

0

9

76

15

Northeast

0

0

18

64

18

Northwest

12

10

22

12

44

 




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