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       Sunday, October 22, 2017

One year ago
Significant rainfall improved topsoil moisture conditions Forty-six per cent of the hay crop had been baled. Predicted average dry land hay yields for both alfalfa and alfalfa brome stands was 0.8 tons/ac. 

Saskatchewan producers have cut 43 per cent of the hay crop and 21 per cent has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

The quality of the hay crop is rated as 21 per cent excellent and 53 per cent good.  Haying has progressed furthest in the south, where 62 per cent of the crop has been cut and 39 per cent baled or put into silage.  Rain showers, heavy swaths and heavy dew in the mornings and evenings are slowing haying operations.

The expected average dry land hay yield is 1.9 tons per acre for both alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands. This compares to a five-year average of 1.4 tons per acre.

Irrigated alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands are expected to yield on average 2.8 tons per acre.  Greenfeed is expected to yield two tons per acre on dry-land and 2.5 tons per acre on irrigated stands. 

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 37 per cent surplus, 60 per cent adequate and three per cent short.  Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 22 per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate and four per cent short.

Some warmer weather has helped advance crops; however, most are still one to two weeks behind normal in development.  Eighty-three per cent of the winter wheat, 84 per cent of the fall rye, 90 per cent of the triticale and 79 per cent of the peas are in good to excellent condition.  Seventy-eight per cent of the spring wheat, 82 per cent of the durum, 78 per cent of the oats, 79 per cent of the barley, 81 per cent of the flax, 71 per cent of the canola, 80 per cent of the mustard, 81 per cent of the lentils, 82 per cent of the canaryseed and 90 per cent of the chickpeas are in fair to good condition.

The majority of crop damage is being caused by flooding, insects, hail and wind.  Leaf diseases, root rot and gophers are also causing damage.  Grasshoppers are causing crop damage in areas in the south.  Farmers in some areas of the north are taking measures to control wheat midge.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling crop diseases and insects.

Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Scattered rain showers fell throughout the region; some areas had a week of little to no moisture. The Kisbey area received 68 mm of rain, the Indian Head, Whitewood and Tantallon areas 19 mm, and the Fillmore and Radville areas 5 mm. Many areas reported less than 10 mm of rain for the week.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are reported as 27 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and one per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 16 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and five per cent short. Crop District 3ASE is reporting topsoil moisture on cropland is seven per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate and six per cent short.

Crop damage is mostly attributed to flooding, hail and leaf diseases. Hail was reported in the Indian Head and Radville areas. Grasshoppers are also causing damage is some areas.

Producers have 28 per cent of the hay cut and 26 per cent baled or put into silage. Forty-six per cent is still standing. Eighty-four per cent of the hay crop is rated good to excellent. Rain throughout the area has slowed some producers down. The swaths have been slow to dry due to high humidity, wet ground and rain. 

Better weather conditions during the past week allowed producers to get some field work done. There was a report of farmers controlling wheat midge.  Crops are improving with the warm weather, but are still behind normal in development. Although crop staging is variable, there are reports of cereal crops heading out, canola flowering and flax in the stem extension to flowering stage.  Aphids are starting to show up.  Farmers are busy haying, controlling weeds in chem-fallow, controlling diseases and insects and hauling grain.

Southeastern SK Crop conditions - July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

durum

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

32

47

12

10

15

12

9

% good

61

41

55

58

50

52

43

% fair

7

11

22

22

22

25

33

% poor

0

1

7

7

9

8

12

% very poor

0

0

4

3

4

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

chickpeas

 

% excellent

11

1

12

3

13

0

 

% good

49

57

54

54

62

83

 

% fair

28

28

23

24

15

15

 

% poor

7

11

6

14

6

2

 

% very poor

5

3

5

5

4

0

 

 

SE expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

alfalfa

alfalfa/brome

other tame

wild

greenfeed

Dry land

2.02

2.2

1.79

1.49

1.82

Irrigated

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ton = 2000 lb.

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

The eastern side of the region recorded little rainfall during the past week, while other areas reported more than 10 mm. The Lafleche area received 8 mm, the Bengough area trace amounts, the Spring Valley and Eyebrow areas 4 mm, the Coderre area 19 mm, the Blumenhof area 22 mm, the Kyle area 32 mm, the Shaunavon area 21 mm and the Richmound area 28 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and 12 per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are two per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and two per cent very short. CDs 3ASW and 3BS are reporting 29 and 34 per cent short, respectively, on cropland topsoil moisture.

Crop damage has been caused by hail, grasshoppers and gophers. Hail damage was reported in the Admiral, Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas.  Hail damage in recent weeks ranges from light to total.  Leaf diseases and root rot are also causing crop damage.  

The region has 23 per cent of the hay cut, 39 per cent baled or put into silage and 38 per cent still standing. Quality is rated as 76 per cent good to excellent, provided the rain does not cause quality damage. Farmers are expecting good hay yields. Hay is slow to dry due to high humidity, heavy swaths and rain showers.

Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling weeds, diseases and grasshoppers.  Crop staging varies from field to field. Peas and mustard are podding, chickpeas are flowering, canola is flowering and podding and cereals are heading out. Hail-damaged peas and lentils in the Viceroy area are starting to come back. Some reporters are indicating they could use some light moisture, with some areas indicating the last good rain was June 19. Producers are controlling grasshoppers in lentils. Isolated showers shut some haying operations down for a day or two. Greenfeed is ready to cut in some areas.  Pastures and cattle look great.

Southwestern SK Crop conditions- July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

durum

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

27

32

15

15

39

14

6

% good

55

60

68

68

48

69

42

% fair

18

8

16

15

13

17

52

% poor

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

chickpeas

 

% excellent

13

30

20

11

19

10

 

% good

71

58

67

74

59

75

 

% fair

16

12

13

15

22

15

 

% poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

SW expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

alfalfa

alfalfa/brome

other tame

wild

greenfeed

Dry land

2.11

2.11

1.92

1.57

2.28

Irrigated

2.81

2.72

2.00

N/A

N/A

 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Spotty showers and thunderstorms were reported throughout the region. During the past week, the region recorded precipitation amounts from nil to 77 mm. Most areas in the region recorded more than 20 mm of rain. The Stockholm area received no rain, the Kelliher area received 48 mm, the Quill Lake area 22 mm, the Foam Lake area 77 mm, the Bethune area 7 mm and the Humboldt area 39 mm.  Since April 1, the region has received between 233 mm and 619 mm of rain.

Topsoil moisture remains relatively the same as last week. Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as 65 per cent surplus and 35 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 45 per cent surplus and 55 per cent adequate.

Flooding continues to be the cause of the majority of crop damage. Hail damage was reported in the Stockholm, Neudorf, Jedburgh, Foam Lake and Holdfast areas.  Leaf diseases are also causing crop damage. There were reports of some farmers controlling wheat midge and bertha armyworms.

Haying operations continue, with 17 per cent of the hay crop cut, 14 per cent baled or put into silage and 69 per cent still standing. Quality is reported as 65 per cent good to excellent, depending on flooding damage to hay fields and the amount of rain on the swaths. Heavy swaths are slow to dry due to high humidity and rain.

Due to the excess moisture stress, some crops are blooming and podding prematurely. The continued rain in areas has made haying very difficult. Livestock producers are worried about the quality of hay and the amount of straw that will be available for winter bedding. Aerial spraying is continuing in other areas where the fields are too wet for the ground sprayer. There were reports of some farmers spraying out entire fields due to high weed pressure. Crop reporters are indicating that fields will have to dry out quite a bit before any winter cereals can be seeded. Ruts in fields will be causing problems for machinery for harvest and spring seeding. Farmers in areas of little rain were able to get back onto the land to cultivate or spray unseeded acres. 

Field operations in areas in CD 6A are a little more promising, as many areas missed the heavier rain. Grasshoppers are starting to show up in CD 6A, but control measures are not yet warranted. Cereals are heading out; most of the canola, mustard and flax is flowering.

East-central SK Crop conditions - July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

durum

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

17

26

4

12

5

5

5

% good

61

54

56

75

47

50

55

% fair

14

9

23

13

34

30

31

% poor

7

10

14

0

14

13

8

% very poor

1

1

3

0

0

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

chickpeas

 

% excellent

6

11

19

12

6

21

 

% good

47

61

53

60

54

68

 

% fair

27

26

20

23

31

11

 

% poor

18

2

5

5

9

0

 

% very poor

2

0

3

0

0

0

 

 

EC expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

Alfalfa

Alfalfa/Brome

Other Tame

Wild

Greenfeed

Dry land

2.05

1.99

1.74

1.61

2.57

Irrigated

N/A

2.48

N/A

N/A

N/A


West-Central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Most of the region recorded rain during the past week, ranging from 1 mm to 51 mm. Thunderstorms caused wind, hail and heavy rain in some areas. The Dinsmore area received 8 mm of rain, the Arelee area 51 mm, the Eston area 20 mm, the Rosetown area 40 mm, the Scott area 48 mm, and the Biggar and Landis areas 21 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 39 per cent surplus and 61 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 33 per cent surplus, 66 per cent adequate and one per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is due to flooding and wind.  Areas that received hail include Arelee, Denzil and Macklin areas. Wind damage was reported in several areas as well.  Leaf diseases and grasshoppers are also causing damage. Some producers are controlling bertha armyworms and sclerotinia in canola crops and grasshoppers in lentils.

Haying continues, with 19 per cent of the crop cut, 13 per cent baled or put into silage and 68 per cent still standing. Quality is rated 75 per cent good to excellent. Some are concerned about getting the hay crop put up in good condition. The recent rain has decreased the quality of hay in the swath. The hay yields look good. The hay swath is slow to dry due to rain, heavy swath and high humidity.

Due to rain showers during the majority of the week, haying operations were stalled until the weekend. Farmers are busy haying and controlling weeds and diseases. Wet areas are still causing some problems in terms of disease and weed control applications. Crops are looking pretty good, although behind normal in development by one to two weeks.  Heat and sun are needed.

West-central SK Crop conditions - July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

durum

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

12

25

15

19

10

13

3

% good

80

68

71

64

70

69

68

% fair

8

7

13

15

18

16

26

% poor

0

0

1

2

2

2

3

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

chickpeas

 

% excellent

12

12

27

22

14

8

 

% good

62

73

64

62

68

66

 

% fair

20

15

8

14

15

21

 

% poor

6

0

1

1

3

4

 

% very poor

0

0

0

1

0

1

 

 

WC expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

alfalfa

alfalfa/brome

other tame

wild

greenfeed

Dry land

2.08

1.87

1.86

1.38

2.12

Irrigated

3.00

3.5

3.5

N/A

2.5

 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Rain was reported in the region in amounts ranging from 12 to 48 mm. The Tisdale and Bruno areas received 14 mm of rain, the Codette area 39 mm, the Humboldt area 44 mm, the Melfort area 16 mm and the Prince Albert area 19 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture continues to increase and is rated as 75 per cent surplus and 25 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 61 per cent surplus and 39 per cent adequate.

Crop damage is due to flooding, hail and wheat midge.  Hail was reported in the Tisdale and Arborfield areas. Wheat midge has been reported in the Tisdale, Bruno, Vonda, Arborfield and Star City areas, and farmers are using control measures.

Farmers made progress with haying during the past week, although rain again has made access to fields difficult and drying time extremely slow.  Nineteen per cent of the 2010 hay crop is cut, seven per cent is baled or put into silage and 74 per cent is still standing. Quality is rated as 83 per cent fair to good.  There is concern about how much hay will be cut and put up in good condition if the rain continues. There are some producers who have not started haying yet.

Crops are patchy and continue to suffer from excess moisture (yellowing). Crops that looked not too bad a week ago are now showing more signs of moisture stress. Some crops have been sprayed out, where sprayers can get onto the land, as weed pressures have become too high or growth/emergence is too poor as a result of excess moisture. Fields are still extremely wet. Canola and peas are flowering; cereals are in the flag leaf to heading stages. Field work continues to be a challenge.

Northeastern SK Crop conditions - July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

13

32

2

0

0

0

% good

68

32

43

40

32

18

% fair

15

35

32

44

44

64

% poor

3

1

18

15

19

15

% very poor

1

0

5

1

5

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

 

% excellent

2

0

0

0

0

 

% good

27

35

47

38

13

 

% fair

29

40

30

30

78

 

% poor

32

23

18

30

8

 

% very poor

10

2

5

2

1

 

 

NE expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

alfalfa

alfalfa/brome

other tame

wild

greenfeed

Dry land

1.54

1.58

1.21

1.15

1.32

Irrigated

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The thunderstorms that rolled through the region dropped between 11 and 64 mm of rain. The Duck Lake area received 11 mm, the Debden area 64 mm, the Radisson area 21 mm, the Lloydminster area 36 mm, the Pierceland area 48 mm and the Neilburg area 28 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are 10 per cent surplus and 90 per cent adequate. Pasture and hay land conditions are three per cent surplus and 97 per cent adequate.

Crop damage was mostly attributed to flooding. Hail damage was reported in the Hafford and Turtleford areas.

Haying continues, with 23 per cent of the crop cut, 10 per cent baled or put into silage and 67 per cent is still standing. Quality is reported as 83 per cent good to fair. Hay yields look good. Recent rains have lowered the quality of hay in the swath. Pastures are looking good.

Despite the rain, the warmer temperatures helped advance crops. Farmers are busy scouting fields and controlling diseases. Canola crops are blooming and peas are blooming and starting to pod. Crops look pretty good for the most part, except in low areas where they are flooded out or stressed from moisture. Crops are at varying stages of development and are about one to two weeks behind normal in development.

Northwestern SK Crop conditions - July 19, 2010

 

fall rye

spring wheat

oats

barley

% excellent

0

34

25

26

% good

26

49

57

57

% fair

74

17

18

17

% poor

0

0

0

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

flax

canola

peas

lentils

% excellent

0

33

41

0

% good

90

47

46

0

% fair

10

19

13

100

% poor

0

1

0

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

 

NW expected hay yields (tons/acre) - July 19, 2010

 

alfalfa

alfalfa/brome

other tame

wild

greenfeed

Dry land

1.56

1.62

0.99

0.98

2.12

Irrigated

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

SK (provincial) Crop conditions- July 19, 2010 

 

winter wheat

fall rye

spring wheat

durum

oats

barley

flax

% excellent

24

30

13

14

13

10

7

% good

60

54

58

65

50

52

46

% fair

13

14

20

17

28

27

35

% poor

3

2

7

3

8

9

9

% very poor

0

0

2

1

1

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

canola

mustard

peas

lentils

canaryseed

chickpeas

 

% excellent

11

16

21

12

11

9

 

% good

46

60

58

64

56

75

 

% fair

25

20

16

18

26

16

 

% poor

14

3

3

4

5

0

 

% very poor

4

1

2

2

2

0

 

 

 

 

 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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