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     Monday, September 22, 2014

One year ago
Eighty-seven per cent of the hay crop was cut, with 68 per cent of this baled or put into silage. Sixteen per cent of the fall rye had been swathed. Combining had started on winter cereals, peas and lentils.

 

Saskatchewan producers have 82 per cent of the hay crop cut and 60 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

The quality of the hay crop is rated as 17 per cent excellent, 63 per cent good and 10 per cent fair. Haying has progressed furthest in the south, where 86 per cent of the crop has been cut and 68 per cent baled or put into silage. The central regions of the province have 75 per cent of the crop cut and 50 per cent baled or put into silage, and the northern regions have 79 per cent cut and 55 per cent baled or put into silage. High humidity and rain showers continue to slow haying progress. Thunderstorms continue in parts of the province, dropping hail and large amounts of rain.

Harvest has just begun in the southern regions. Fall rye is being swathed and winter wheat combined. Crops are one to two weeks behind normal in development in most areas of the province.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 22 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and six per cent short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate, seven per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is being caused by flooding and hail. Insects, disease, gophers and wind are also causing crop damage.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling crop diseases and insects.

Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Almost all areas in the region reported rain during the past week. The Manor area received 18 mm of rain, the Lampman area 2 mm, the Grenfell area 72 mm, the Wawota area 1 mm, the Griffin area 23 mm, the Odessa area 31 mm, the Indian Head area 11 mm and the Ceylon area 38 mm. The Windthorst and Wilcox areas recorded no rain for the week. Significant rainfall in the Summerberry area filled creeks again. Strong winds and hail were reported in some areas.

Eighty-four per cent of the hay has been cut, with 61 per cent of that baled or put into silage. Sixteen per cent is still standing. Quality is rated as 28 per cent excellent, 52 per cent good and eight per cent fair. Rain throughout the area has slowed haying for some producers. The swaths have been slow to dry due to high humidity and frequent rain showers.  

Harvest has just nicely begun. Five per cent of the fall rye has been swathed. A few fields of winter wheat, canola and peas are being cut as well.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are reported as 16 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and four per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Crop District1B is reporting 25 per cent surplus topsoil moisture on cropland.

Crop damage is mostly attributed to hail and wind. The following communities reported hail damage: Carlyle, Frobisher, Alameda, Manor, Stoughton, Indian Head and Ceylon. Hail stones that fell at Carlyle were jagged and two to four inches in diameter. Leaf diseases are also causing crop damage. Wheat midge were reported in areas of CDs 1B and 2B.

Crops have advanced nicely with the warm weather the past few weeks. Haying is proving difficult, with thunderstorms and high humidity slowing work. Hay quality has been reduced in some areas due to rain on the swaths. Crops are in various stages of development from flowering to ripening. Many areas are still one to two weeks behind normal in crop development. Producers in other areas will start to swath canola and desiccate peas by the end of the week. Weed control on unseeded acres and disease control continues when the weather allows. Farmers are busy haying, controlling weeds in chem-fallow, controlling disease, getting ready for harvest and hauling grain.

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Thunderstorms and rain were recorded for most of the region, with the southern parts receiving the most rain. The Glentworth area received 60 mm of rain, the Rockglen area 10 mm, the Viceroy area 3 mm, the Mossbank and Coderre areas 4 mm, the Shaunavon area 40 mm, the Mankota area 11 mm, the Kyle area 50 mm, the Gull Lake are 24 mm and the Leader area 19 mm. The Rush Lake, Swift Current and Cabri areas reported no rain for the week.

The region has 89 per cent of the hay cut, with 76 per cent of that baled or put into silage. Eleven per cent is still standing. Quality is rated as 28 per cent excellent and 63 per cent good.

Harvest has just begun, with 15 per cent of the fall rye swathed. Crop reporters are indicating there are a few pea fields ready to straight-combine.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 84 per cent adequate, 12 per cent short and four per cent very short. Cropland topsoil moisture conditions in CDs 3ASW and 3BS are 33 and 21 per cent short, respectively..

Crop damage has been caused by hail, grasshoppers and gophers. Hail was reported in the following areas: Bengough, Glentworth, Limerick, Lafleche, Hazenmore, Admiral, Consul, Gull Lake and Maple Creek. Spotty and intense rain and hail storms are causing hail damage from 30 to 100 per cent. Crops in some areas could use some rain to help with filling. A few of those areas received the rain this past week, while others continue to miss it. Gophers are causing the most damage in CD 3BS. Grasshoppers are being controlled in lentils.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling weeds on fields that were not seeded. Crop staging varies from field to field. Wheat is heading, canola and mustard are podding and peas and lentils are turning. Harvest should start by the end of the week on early-seeded peas and canola. Later-seeded crops are still flowering. Livestock producers are not cutting too far ahead of the baler to avoid having their hay rained upon.

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Thunderstorms throughout the region brought more rain. Most areas reported less than 15 mm of rain, but amounts ranged from nil to 34 mm. The Stockholm, Ituna and Bethune areas received 10 mm, the Saltcoats area 14 mm, the Kuroki area 28 mm, the Craik area 34 mm and the Meacham area 30 mm.

Progress was made with haying during the past week as many areas received only small amounts of rain. Seventy-five per cent of the hay crop is cut and 51 per cent of that has been baled or put into silage; 25 per cent still standing. Frequent rain, wet hay fields and high humidity are slowing progress in some areas. Hay quality is reported as 13 per cent excellent, 66 per cent good and 13 per cent fair. Haying progress is variable across the region. Crop District 5A is reporting 76 per cent is cut (53 per cent baled), CD 5B is reporting 61 per cent cut (37 per cent baled) and CD 6A is reporting 84 per cent cut (59 per cent baled).

A few fields of winter wheat and fall rye have been swathed.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as 39 per cent surplus, 60 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 28 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and one per cent short. CD 5B is reporting 76 and 54 per cent surplus topsoil moisture on cropland and hay land and pasture, respectively.

Flooding continues to cause the majority of crop damage. Hail damage was reported in the Saltcoats, Jedburgh, Kamsack and Foam Lake areas.

Crop staging and condition varies across the region. Crop stages ranges from flowering to beginning to turn. There were a couple reports of farmers cutting the weeds in the unseeded acres to try to get the land into shape for next year. Spraying and tilling continues on unseeded acres. The warm weather has pushed crops along.

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

The region recorded rain in amounts ranging from nil to 51 mm. The Dinsmore area received 30 mm of rain, the Langham and Netherhill areas 2 mm, the Biggar area 47 mm, the Unity area 51 mm, the Luseland area 33 mm, the Major, Macklin and Hanley areas received 10 mm.

Seventy-six per cent of the hay crop has been cut and 49 per cent of that has been baled up or put into silage; 24 per cent is still standing. Quality is rated 11 per cent excellent, 59 per cent good and 22 per cent fair. The hay yields look good. The amount of rain on the swath will determine the quality. Hay swaths are slow to dry due to frequent rain and high humidity.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 20 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate and five per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 15 per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.

Most fall rye crops are ready to swath.

The majority of crop damage is due to flooding, wheat midge and grasshoppers. Wheat midge numbers are quite high in areas, and farmers are applying insecticides for control.  Grasshopper infestations are not severe in the majority of crops, but farmers are finding sufficient severity in lentil crops to warrant control. Leaf diseases are also causing damage. Hail damage was reported in the Kerrobert area. The heavy rain in some areas has caused some crops to lodge. Crop damage from late-season disease infestations is being reported.

Farmers are busy haying, controlling weeds, disease and insects and hauling grain. Crops are looking pretty good in most areas, although one to two weeks behind normal in development. Crop staging is variable. Producers are looking for some heat to push crops along, especially in lentils where the relatively cool weather has not initiated the end of flowering. Most crops are flowering, while others are podding and starting to fill. For the most part, the crops look good.

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

All areas reported rain from thunderstorms this past week. The Tisdale area received 12 mm of rain, the Arborfield, Codette and Garrick areas recorded 3 mm, the Humboldt area 30 mm, the Lake Lenore and Bruno areas 6 mm and the Melfort area 10 mm.

Eighty-one per cent of the hay crop has been cut, and 57 per cent of that has been baled or put into silage; 19 per cent of the hay crop is still standing. Quality is rated as 85 per cent good. Crop reporters are indicated some hay fields are saturated and some swaths are in the water.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 52 per cent surplus, 46 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 42 per cent surplus, 54 per cent adequate and four per cent short.

Crop damage is due to flooding and disease. Hail damage was reported in the Tisdale and Nipawin areas.  Crops are lodging in areas that received heavy rain. 

Farmers are busy haying, controlling weeds and diseases and scouting for insect damage. Wheat midge infestations were heavy in some areas. Crop staging is variable across the region and crops are still one to two weeks behind normal in development. Canola is finishing up flowering and cereals are in the heading stage. Field work continues to be a challenge with the wet fields and continued rain.

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Thunderstorms rolled through the region last week, leaving rain in amounts ranging from nil to 32 mm. The Leask area received 32 mm, the Spiritwood and Rapid View areas 13 mm, the St. Walburg, Frenchman Butte and Meadow Lake areas received 4 mm and the Dorintosh area 5 mm. The Radisson, Medstead and Glaslyn areas recorded no rain for the week.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are six per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Pasture and hay land conditions are 100 per cent adequate.

Seventy-eight per cent cut of the hay crop has been cut and 54 per cent of that baled or put into silage; 22 per cent is still standing. Quality is reported as six per cent excellent, 69 per cent good and 19 per cent fair. The recent rains have lowered the quality of hay in some areas. Hay yields and pastures look good.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and six per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 93 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.

Wind was the major cause of crop damage.

The warmer temperatures helped advance crops. Most canola and pea crops have finished flowering and are in the podding stage. Cereals have headed out and started to fill. Most crops are one to two weeks behind normal in development, but look quite good. Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling insects.

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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