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    Saturday, December 16, 2017

One year ago
Eighty-seven per cent of the hay crop was cut, with 68 per cent of this baled or put into silage. Sixteen per cent of the fall rye had been swathed. Combining had started on winter cereals, peas and lentils.

Just over two per cent of the 2010 crop is swathed or ready to straight-combine, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Less than one per cent of the crop has been combined. When broken down by crop, six per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye and three per cent of the lentils and peas have been combined. The five-year provincial average (2005 to 2009) for this time of year is five per cent combined. The wet and cool weather has delayed crop maturity and slowed harvest.

Haying continues. Rain, high humidity and heavy dew continue to slow progress. Saskatchewan livestock producers have 90 per cent of the hay crop cut, with 80 per cent of that baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as nine per cent excellent, 65 per cent good, 15 per cent fair and two per cent poor.

The estimated hay yield for both dryland alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is 2.1 tons per acre. Estimated yield on irrigated alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is 2.7 tons per acre. Greenfeed is expected to yield 2.4 tons per acre on dryland and three tons per acre on irrigated stands. The five-year average (2005 to 2009) yield on dry land alfalfa/brome stands is 1.4 tons per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 27 per cent surplus, 70 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as 15 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and five per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is being caused by flooding, disease and hail. 

Farmers are busy haying, getting ready for harvest and hauling grain.


Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation Report

The deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat is August 25.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

All areas received between six and 60 mm of rain during the week. The Redvers area received 60 mm, the Gainsborough area 35 mm, the Maryfield area 45 mm, the Broadview area 9 mm, the Weyburn area 34 mm, the Wilcox area 50 mm, the Marquis area 32 mm, the Radville area 28 mm and the Ceylon area 14 mm.

The region has two per cent of the crop combined and over six per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Twenty per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye, two per cent of the barley, 10 per cent of the lentils, nine per cent of the field peas and one per cent of the mustard have been combined. Twenty-nine per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye, four per cent of the spring wheat, seven per cent of the durum, one per cent of the oats, three per cent of the barley, two per cent of the lentils and 17 per cent of the field peas are swathed or ready to straight-combine.

Haying is proving difficult, with rain and high humidity slowing operations. Hay quality has also been reduced in some areas due to rain on the swath. Baling hours are cut short due humidity in the evening. Ninety-three per cent of the hay in the region is cut and 87 per cent of this has been baled or put into silage. Six per cent is in the swath. Quality is rated as seven per cent excellent, 73 per cent good and 13 per cent fair. Some producers are concerned that they may not get some hay fields cut.

Estimated hay yields are as follows: dryland alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands, 2.3 tons per acre; dryland greenfeed, 1.9 tons per acre.

Some cattle producers are having issues with foot rot in cattle due to the wet conditions.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are reported as 18 per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate, three per cent short and one per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 10 per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate, five per cent short and two per cent very short. Twenty-two per cent of cropland in Crop District 3ASW is short of topsoil moisture.

Crop damage is mostly attributed to hail, wind and flooding. The following communities reported hail damage: Frobisher, Lampman, Manor, Tantallon, Fillmore and Ceylon. On August 12, wind and hail northwest of Manor damaged between 10 to 80 per cent of crops in a one mile by nine mile strip. There was also hail damage reported south of Carlyle. Disease is also causing crop damage. The recent rain is causing some disease concerns in ripening pulse crops. Sprouting and bleaching in swathed cereals is also a concern.

Crop maturity has slowed due to cool and wet weather. Some warm weather is needed to push the crops along. Many areas are still one to two weeks behind normal in crop development. Farmers are haying, getting ready for harvest and controlling weeds on unseeded acres.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

All areas of the region received between 12 and 82 mm of rain for the week. Most of the region reported above 20 mm the week. The Consul area received 82 mm, the Rockglen, Tyner and Gull Lake areas 65 mm, the Coderre area 39 mm, the Shaunavon area 42 mm and the Glenbain area received 12 mm.

The region has one per cent of the 2010 crop combined. Three per cent of the field peas, one per cent of the lentils, four per cent of the winter wheat and seven per cent of the fall rye have been combined. Sixteen per cent of the winter wheat, 31 per cent of the fall rye, one per cent of the oats, 12 per cent of the triticale, 10 per cent of the canola, two per cent of the mustard, four per cent of the lentils, 14 per cent of the field peas and three per cent of the chickpeas are swathed or are ready to straight-combine.

Haying is wrapping up in the region. Ninety-five per cent has been cut, and 89 per cent of that has been baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as 23 per cent excellent, 65 per cent good and four per cent fair. The estimated hay yield on dryland alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is two tons per acre. The estimated yield on irrigated alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is 2.8 tons per acre. Dryland greenfeed yield is estimated as 3.3 tons per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate and six short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as five per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate and nine per cent short. CDs 3BN and 4B are reporting 29 and 22 per cent surplus topsoil moisture, while CD 3ASW is reporting 22 per cent short topsoil moisture on cropland.

Crop damage has been caused by hail, disease and flooding. Hail damage was reported in the following areas: Rockglen, Glentworth, Consul, Shaunavon, Gull Lake and Maple Creek. Disease is also causing damage to pulses.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, getting ready for harvest, hauling bales and scouting fields. The recent rain has farmers with desiccated pulses and swathed cereals worried about crop quality. Farmers are also concerned about an early frost, as nighttime temperatures are dropping and crops are two weeks behind in most cases. Crops are lodged in areas where there were heavy rains. A few weeks of dry and sunny weather are needed.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

All of the region's crop reporters recorded rain in amounts ranging from four to 80 mm. Since April 1, between 259 and 716 mm of rain has fallen on the region. The Saltcoats area received 75 mm, the Ituna area 4 mm, the Elfros area 80 mm, the Foam Lake area 70 mm, the Quill Lake area 22 mm, the Lumsden area 9 mm, the Allan area 64 mm and the Craik area 18 mm.

One per cent of the fall rye has been combined. Twelve per cent of the winter wheat, 31 per cent of the fall rye, one per cent of the barley and three per cent of the field peas are swathed or ready to straight-combine.

Haying is continuing, albeit slowly due to high humidity and rain showers. Eighty-eight per cent of the hay is cut, and 75 per cent of that has been baled up or put into silage. Quality is rated as eight per cent excellent, 60 per cent good and 20 per cent fair. The yield on dryland alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is estimated to be 2.2 tons per acre. Dry land green feed yield is estimated to be 2.1 tons per acre.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as 44 per cent surplus, 54 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 29 per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate and three per cent short. CD 5B is reporting 63 and 49 per cent surplus topsoil moisture on cropland and hay land and pasture, respectively.

Flooding, disease and hail were the major causes of crop damage. The Churchbridge area reported flooding. Hail damage was reported in the Churchbridge, Stockholm and Saltcoats areas. Disease in pulse crops and lodging in areas that received heavy rain are causing concerns as well.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest. Early-seeded wheat and pulses are being desiccated and swathed. Crops need two to three weeks to mature. Sunny and dry weather is needed. The land has not had any opportunity to dry out. Getting into the wet fields with equipment is very difficult.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

All areas reported between six to 79 mm of rain for the week. Most areas received more than 25 mm of moisture. The Conquest, Netherhill and Dinsmore areas received 66 mm, the Sonningdale area 6 mm, the Herschel area 79 mm, the Kerrobert area 49 mm and the Cando and Battleford area 13 mm.

Three per cent of the winter wheat and one per cent of the fall rye have been combined. Thirty-six per cent of the winter wheat, 31 per cent of the fall rye and one per cent of the canola and mustard is swathed or ready to straight-combine.

Haying continues. The hay swaths are slow to dry due to rain and high humidity. Most of the hay that has been cut in the past week has been rained on at least once. Eighty-three per cent of the hay crop has been cut, and 70 per cent of that has been baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as 63 per cent good, 26 per cent fair and five per cent poor. The estimated yield on dryland alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is 2.2 tons per acre. Dry land greenfeed is estimated to yield 2.6 tons per acre. The estimated yields on irrigated alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is 3.4 and 3.9 tons per acre, respectively.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 33 per cent surplus and 67 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 24 per cent surplus and 76 per cent adequate.

The majority of crop damage is due to disease, flooding and hail. Due to recent moisture, farmers are concerned about quality as the crop matures. Pulses are showing high disease pressures, particularly in lentils, which is causing quality issues. Hail damage was reported in the Herschel, Smiley and Major areas.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest. Crops are one to two weeks behind normal in development, so many farmers are hoping for warm, sunny weather and a long, open fall.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

All areas reported between 11 and 58 mm of rain for the week. The Porcupine Plain area received 46 mm, the Codette area 14 mm, the Alvena area 58 mm, the Humboldt area 38 mm and the Garrick area 23 mm.

Eight per cent of the winter wheat, 12 per cent of the fall rye, and one per cent of the field peas are swathed or ready to straight-combine. Canola is being swathed. Barley crops are ready to straight-cut in some areas.

Haying was interrupted again this week by rain, high humidity and heavy dew. Eighty-three per cent of the hay crop has been cut and 74 per cent of that has been baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as 12 per cent excellent, 75 per cent good and 13 per cent fair. Dryland hay yields are estimated to be 1.7 and 1.5 tons per acre on alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands, respectively. Dryland green feed yield is estimated to be two tons per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 41 per cent surplus, 55 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 42 per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate and six per cent short. CD 8A is reporting 81 per cent surplus on crop land topsoil moisture.

Crop damage is due to flooding and disease. The heavy rain in some areas has lodged crops.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest. Crop staging is variable across the region and crops are still one to two weeks behind normal in development. There are fields that are blooming. Many fields are still unable to support equipment. Most crop reporters are indicating it will be still two to three weeks until harvest is in full swing.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

All areas reported moisture in amounts ranging from nine to 68 mm. The Duck Lake area received 58 mm, the Spiritwood area 13 mm, the Neilburg and Meadow Lake areas 20 mm, the Lloydminster area 62 mm and the Rapid View area 4 mm.

Harvest has yet to begin in the region. Crops are starting to turn and peas are being desiccated.

Haying continues, but progress is slow due to rain, slow drying time and heavy dew. Some swaths have been in the field for two weeks. Quality of standing hay is starting to decline as it matures. Eighty-eight per cent of the hay crop is cut, with 69 per cent of that baled or put into silage. Quality is rated as 57 per cent good, 14 per cent fair and seven per cent poor. Hay yield on alfalfa and alfalfa/brome stands is estimated at 1.8 tons per acre. Dryland greenfeed yield is estimated at 2.1 tons per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus and 94 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 100 per cent adequate.

Flooding, disease and hail were the causes of most of the crop damage. Hail damage was reported in the Radisson, Debden and North Battleford areas. Disease pressures in pulses have caused some crop damage as well. Some crops are lodging in areas that received heavy rain.

Two to three weeks of frost-free and sunny weather is needed to get the majority of the crop harvested. Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest.


 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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