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    Saturday, December 16, 2017

 One year ago
Eighty-one per cent of the 2009 crop had been harvested. A slight improvement is weather conditions allowed producers to get back into the field, in some areas of the province.  The quality of most crops was average to above average.

Saskatchewan Agriculture has a group of 230 volunteer crop reporters from across the province. Thank you for your valued dedication to the crop report. In 2010, there are three crop reporters reaching their 20 year milestone; six reaching 25 years; three reaching 30 years and four reaching 35 years of crop reporting.
Congratulations!!

Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation Report

The deadline to register yield-loss claims and report production information is November 15. If producers have not completed harvest as of this date, they may request an extension of insurance.
In 2010, producers with winterkill coverage on fall-seeded acres are required to submit a Fall-Seeded Acreage Report by November 15.
For potatoes, November 15 is the insurance coverage cut-off date as well as the final date to assess field-related frost problems in storage.

Saskatchewan producers have nearly all the crop in the bin, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Final Crop Report.

Approximately 99 per cent the crop has been harvested. The five-year provincial average (2005 to 2009) for this time of year is 97 per cent combined. Last year at this time, Saskatchewan farmers had 81 per cent of the crop in the bin.

Across the province, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 31 per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Topsoil moisture conditions on hay land and pasture are rated as 21 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate and four per cent short.

Crop reporters are indicating that crop yields are average to above-average, while quality is below-average.  The majority of flax, canola and mustard crops are predicted to be in the top grade.

The number of acres seeded to fall crops has decreased from last year. Acres seeded to winter wheat and fall rye have decreased by five and 10 per cent, respectively.  In the southeastern and southwesteions respectively, 23 and 14 per cent less winter wheat has been seeded compared to last year.

Across the province, 98 per cent of cattle producers have surplus or adequate winter hay supplies.  Ninety-four per cent have surplus or adequate winter straw supplies.

Farmers are busy finishing fall work: applying fertilizer, hauling bales and grain, cleaning corrals, fixing fence, bringing cattle home from pasture and working sloughs that were too wet to seed this spring. 


2010 Overview

It was a challenging year for Saskatchewan farmers. There was difficulty getting the crop seeded due to continued rain. As of May 31, 2010, 59 per cent of the crop had been seeded compared to the five-year average (2005 to 2009) of 86 per cent complete.  Many farmers were seeding into June. Of the possible 32 million acres, it was estimated that eight million acres were left unseeded and additional four million acres were seeded but damaged by flooding (Canada-Saskatchewan Excess Moisture Program). Cumulative rainfall data from the Crop Report ranges from 363 mm to 915 mm.

The growing season was affected by excess moisture, which, combined with little heat and sunshine, resulted in crops not maturing as quickly as normal. Many crops were stressed from the excess moisture as well the disease pressures. For cattle producers, the haying season was long, as one would need to wait to cut, or hay to dry down in between the rain. Due to the moisture, hay yields were good; however, quality is a concern. Access to hay and pasture was also a problem in many areas of the province, especially in the east-central and northeastern regions, where conditions were extremely wet. Foot rot problems had cattle producers checking and treating often.  

September 18, 2010, was the first fall frost for the province. At that time, many crops were still green and received significant frost damage in some cases. The frequent rain storms that occurred while crops were coming into maturity also caused problems. Only 29 per cent of the 2010 crop had been harvested by September 27. The five-year average for that time of year is 75 per cent combined. The excess moisture, compounded by disease pressures, caused the majority of crop damage and grade loss. Most of the province received 115 to 150 per cent of normal average precipitation (Drought Watch, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada). Cutworms caused crop damage early in the season, while wheat midge damaged crops in the central and northern regions, and sawflies caused some damage in the south.

The October weather was sunny and warm with rarely a rain cloud in the sky. The greatest week-over-week harvest progress (31 per cent) was made from September 28 to October 4. The majority of the harvest was done by October 18, by which time 97 per cent of the crop had been combined. Crop quality is estimated to be below the 10-year average, while crop yields are estimated to be average or above-average. 

Crop reporters are indicating crop grades are quite variable. The majority of the oilseeds (canola, flax, and mustard) is estimated to grade 1CAN. The majority of lentils and peas is estimated to fall in the 2CAN and 3CAN. The majority of the cereals is estimated to grade as 2CW and 3CW.


As of November 2, 2010

All regions of the province are reporting at least 99 per cent of harvest is complete, with the exception of the northwestern region which has just over 98 per cent complete. The October 26 snow storm that affected most of the eastern half of the province had caused some issues in getting fall work done and hauling grain and cattle. The warm weather during the past week has farmers completing fall tasks.  Crop quality is a concern for most Saskatchewan producers. Crop reporters are indicating most of the crop that is still out there is in lower areas of the field where the ground cannot support the weight of the combine.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 41 bu/ac; spring wheat 33 bu/ac; durum 35 bu/ac; oats 58 bu/ac; barley 47 bu/ac; fall rye 36 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 30 bu/ac; mustard 900 lb./ac; lentils 1,200 lb./ac; peas 31 bu/ac; canaryseed 1,100 lb./ac, and chickpeas 1,200 lb./ac. 

As winter approaches, topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are rated as 47 per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate and one per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 31 per cent surplus and 69 per cent adequate.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a 23- and 35-per-cent decrease, respectively, in the number of acres seeded to winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year.

Fifty-five per cent of producers are indicating they have surplus winter hay supplies, 44 per cent have adequate supplies and one per cent are indicating they have inadequate supplies. Six per cent of producers are indicating they have inadequate straw supplies for the winter. Ninety-six per cent of cattle producers have indicated that they have adequate to surplus supplies of greenfeed and feed grain. Hay quality varies within the region. Most producers are hoping for a winter with little snow as spring runoff may become a problem since the soil is already saturated.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 38 bu/ac; spring wheat 32 bu/ac; durum 32 bu/ac; oats 53 bu/ac; barley 52 bu/ac; fall rye 34 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 30 bu/ac; mustard 1,000 lb./ac; lentils 1,200 lb./ac; peas 28 bu/ac; canaryseed 1,000 lb./ac; and chickpeas 1,200 lb./ac. 

As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are nine per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and six per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is seven per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a 14- and four-per cent decrease, respectively, in the number of acres seeded to winter wheat and fall rye compared to last year.

All livestock producers have surplus or adequate hay, greenfeed and seed grain supplies for the winter. Five per cent of livestock producers have inadequate straw supplies. Hay quality varies within the region.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 37 bu/ac; spring wheat 29 bu/ac; durum 34 bu/ac; oats 55 bu/ac; barley 44 bu/ac; fall rye 27 bu/ac; flax 18 bu/ac; canola 25 bu/ac; mustard 900 lb./ac; lentils 1,100 lb./ac; peas 25 bu/ac; canaryseed 1,000 lb./ac; and chickpeas 800 lb./ac. 

As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are 63 per cent surplus, 36 per cent adequate and one per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 49 per cent surplus, 47 per cent adequate and four per cent short. In crop districts 5A and 5B, respectively, 85 and 74 per cent of the cropland has surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a nine-per-cent increase in the acres seeded to winter wheat over last year. Many of these acres were those that were too wet to seed this past spring. There is a 15-per-cent decrease in the number of acres seeded to fall rye over last year.  

Ninety-three per cent of livestock producers indicate they have adequate or surplus supplies of hay for the winter. Ten per cent of livestock producers have inadequate straw supplies for the winter. Ninety-five and 93 per cent of cattle producers indicated they have surplus or adequate greenfeed and feed grain, respectively. Hay quality varies within the region.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 37 bu/ac; spring wheat 29 bu/ac; durum 34 bu/ac; oats 55 bu/ac; barley 44 bu/ac; fall rye 27 bu/ac; flax 18 bu/ac; canola 24 bu/ac; mustard 900 lb./ac; lentils 1,100 lb./ac; peas 25 bu/ac; canaryseed 1,000 lb./ac, and chickpeas 800 lb./ac.

As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are nine per cent surplus, 88 per cent adequate and three per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is five per cent surplus, 91 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Last year at this time, Crop District 7A was reporting topsoil moisture conditions as 46 per cent short on cropland and 76 per cent short on hay land and pasture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a nine-per-cent decrease in the number of acres seeded to winter wheat over last year. There is a two-per-cent decrease in the number of acres seeded to fall rye over last year. 

All livestock producers are reporting that they have surplus or adequate hay supplies for the winter. Two per cent indicate they have an inadequate supply of straw. Ninety-five and 98 per cent of livestock producers have surplus or adequate greenfeed and feed grain, respectively. Hay quality varies within the region.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 36 bu/ac; spring wheat 35 bu/ac; durum 31 bu/ac; oats 70 bu/ac; barley 47 bu/ac; fall rye 36 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 26 bu/ac; lentils 1,100 lb./ac; peas 22 bu/ac; and canaryseed 900 lb./ac.

As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are 66 per cent surplus and 34 per cent adequate. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 44 per cent surplus and 56 per cent adequate. Crop District 8A is reporting that 88 per cent of its cropland has surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a six-per-cent increase in the number of acres seeded to winter wheat over last year. Many of these acres were those that were too wet to seed this past spring.

Ninety-seven per cent of livestock producers are reporting they have surplus or adequate hay, greenfeed and feed grain supplies for the winter. Ten per cent of producers have indicated they have inadequate straw supplies for the winter. Hay quality varies within the region.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. The regional average crop yields are as follows: spring wheat 40 bu/ac; oats 75 bu/ac; barley 61 bu/ac; fall rye 36 bu/ac; flax 20 bu/ac; canola 36 bu/ac; mustard 1,200 lb./ac, and peas 39 bu/ac.  

As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are one per cent surplus and 99 per cent adequate. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 98 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Last year at this time, 33 and 49 per cent of the region's cropland and hay land and pasture was short of topsoil moisture.

Ninety-eight per cent of livestock producers are reporting they have surplus or adequate hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies for the winter. Hay quality varies within the region.


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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