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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

One year ago
Two per cent of the 2010 crop had been seeded. Seeding operations had come to a halt for the week due to rain and snow.   

Just under one per cent of the 2011 crop has been seeded, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report.

Lentils, field peas and cereals are being seeded in a few areas; however, the majority of Saskatchewan producers got a late start to field work due to excess moisture.  Last week, an unusually late snow storm dropped significant amounts of precipitation on parts of southeastern and east-central Saskatchewan.

Areas in the southwest, west-central and northwest have dried up enough for producers to start field work.  Many producers in these regions are expecting to start seeding operations within the week.

The majority of crop reporters are indicating that fields are still very wet, and many recorded precipitation last week.  Across the province, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 59 per cent surplus and 41 per cent adequate.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 43 per cent surplus and 57 per cent adequate.

Eight per cent of the winter wheat crop and four per cent of the fall rye crop have some winter-kill or spring flooding damage.

Farmers are busy calving, hauling cattle to pasture, cleaning seed and preparing machinery for seeding.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Significant amounts of rain and snow accompanied by high winds were reported in the region late last week, compounding the effects of excess moisture. Most of the region's crop reporters have indicated seeding will be at least two weeks away. There has been very little field activity to date. Rural municipalities are busy repairing roads that were cut or washed out. The Stoughton area reported 41 mm of precipitation, the Tantallon area 82 mm, the Windthorst area 47 mm, the Weyburn area 13 mm and the Radville area 9 mm.

There have been a few reports of producers getting onto the land to do some pre-seeding field work and seeding, but most producers are predicting seeding will not begin for another two weeks, and only if the weather cooperates. Fields are a little drier on the western side of the region, and some producers are expecting to get onto the land within the week.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land are rated as 77 per cent surplus and 23 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 66 per cent surplus and 34 per cent adequate.

Seven per cent of the winter wheat and five per cent of the fall rye crops in the region have had winter damage or spring flooding damage.

Some areas in the region received up to 82 mm of moisture, with up to two feet of snow. Access to fields and farm yards is an issue due to impassable roads. The storm was hard on calving operations as some producers reported losing calves and other cattle. 

Farmers are busy calving, cleaning seed, preparing machinery and fixing fences.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Some producers have been able to get into the fields to do some pre-seeding field work and begin seeding. There are other areas where seeding and field work is still delayed by one to two weeks. All regions have reported some seeding progress. Field peas, lentils, barley, canola and wheat are being seeded. Just under two per cent of the 2011 crop has been seeded.

The region received a few rain showers during the week. The Bengough and Swift Current areas received 6 mm, the Spring Valley area 5 mm, the Admiral area 8 mm and the Eastend area 11 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 47 per cent surplus and 53 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 28 per cent surplus and 72 per cent adequate. Crop reporters have indicated 10 per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the fall rye crop has winter damage or has been damaged by flooding. Road access to fields is still an issue in some areas.

Pastures are starting to green up. Farmers are busy calving, hauling cattle to pasture, cleaning seed, preparing machinery and seeding.  


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

There are reports of pre-seeding field work and seeding in Crop District 6A. Barley, field peas and lentils are being seeded in 6A. The majority of farmers have yet to begin seeding due to excess moisture. Crop reporters are indicating severe flooding in areas which has damaged roads and culverts, and flooded farm yards. Seeding is expected to be delayed for at least another two to three weeks in crop districts 5A and 5B. Crop District 5A was the northern edge of the snow storm last Friday and Saturday, and some areas received up to 86 mm of moisture. The Langenburg area received 53 mm, the Yorkton area 36 mm, the Stockholm area 86 mm and the Kamsack area 15 mm. Crop District 6A received some rain showers

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 79 per cent surplus and 21 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 67 per cent surplus and 33 per cent adequate. Eleven per cent of the winter wheat and four per cent of the fall rye has winter damage or flooding damage.  Many pastures and fields are flooded or inaccessible due to washed out roads. The RMs are busy trying to fix roads. The snow storm brought 80 km per hour winds with it, causing problems for calving operations.

Farmers are busy calving, cleaning seed, preparing machinery and trying to deal with the water.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

A few producers were able to get onto the land to do some pre-seeding field work and seeding. Lentils, peas, canola and durum are being seeded. The rest of producers are anticipating field work will start next week. Rain showers rolled through the region last week, delaying seeding in some areas. The Sonningdale area received 2 mm of precipitation, the Netherhill area 10 mm, the Kindersley area 8 mm, the Kerrobert area 11 mm and the Wilke area 9 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 43 per cent surplus and 57 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 26 per cent surplus and 74 per cent adequate. Pastures have started to green up during the past week.

Two per cent of the winter wheat and four per cent of the fall rye has winter damage or flooding damage.

Farmers are busy calving, cleaning seed, hauling grain, working on machinery and doing some pre-seeding field work.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Fields have started to dry during the past few days due to fairly warm and windy conditions. There are a few reports of producers getting onto the land to do some pre-seeding field work. Seeding is expected to start in some areas this week. Most crop reporters have indicated seeding is 10 days to two weeks away.

A few rain showers were recorded in the region, dropping 1 to 2 mm of rain in some areas.  Many roads are flooded or washed out.

Crop reporters are indicating 10 per cent of the winter wheat and five per cent of the fall rye has winter damage or spring flooding damage. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 62 per cent surplus and 38 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 61 per cent surplus and 39 per cent adequate.

Some pastures are flooded or inaccessible.

Farmers are calving, readying machinery, cleaning grain and doing some pre-seeding field work.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Pre-seeding field work has started in some areas of the region. A few crop reporters have indicated some canola has been seeded, but the majority of seeding is still 10 days to two weeks away. Rain showers rolled through the region. The North Battleford and Debden areas received 3 mm, the St. Walburg area 24 mm, the Turtleford area 15 mm, the Pierceland area 22 mm and the Neilburg area 10 mm.

Cropland top soil moisture is reported as 26 per cent surplus and 74 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus and 96 per cent adequate. Five per cent of the winter wheat and three per cent of the fall rye has winter damage or spring flooding damage.

Pastures are starting to green up. Farmers are busy readying equipment, calving, moving grain, cleaning seed and doing some pre-seeding field work.




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