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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago

Eighty-two per cent of the 2010 hay crop had been cut and 60 per cent was baled or put into silage. Harvest had just begun in the southeast region with winter cereals being harvested.

Saskatchewan livestock producers continue to make good haying progress and now have 84 per cent of the hay crop cut. Sixty-seven per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Haying progress varies across the province, ranging from 91 per cent cut (west-central) to 64 per cent cut (northwest). Eighty-six per cent of the hay crop is cut in the southeastern region, 88 per cent in the southwestern region, 89 per cent in the east-central region and 88 per cent in the northeastern region.

Seventy-six per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage in the southwest, 72 per cent in east-central, 67 per cent in the northeast, 72 per cent in the southeast, 75 per cent in west-central and 34 per cent in the northwest.  

Ninety per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality, eight per cent is rated as fair and two per cent is reported as poor quality.

Producers are starting to harvest in some regions of the province. Farmers are desiccating pulses and swathing mustard, canola and fall cereals in some regions. A few lentil fields have been combined in some areas. The majority of crop damage is due to hail, wind and insects. Extreme winds and hail during the past week damaged crops and buildings in some areas.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as seven per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate, 14 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and one per cent very short.

While crops are generally still behind normal in development, the warm weather over the past couple of weeks has advanced crops and many producers are expected to harvest in the next couple of weeks.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest.  

 


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

 

Precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 30 mm , with extreme wind reported in some areas of the region. The Gainsborough area received 25 mm, the Lampman area 2 mm, the Broadview area 30 mm, the Maryfield area 8 mm, the Weyburn area 5 mm, the Odessa area 24 mm, the Marquis area 12 mm and the Radville area 8 mm. High winds in the Lampman, Odessa, Indian Head and Moose Jaw areas caused damage to bins and yards, and caused some crops to lodge.

With the sunny, warm weather, producers made progress with haying. Eighty-six per cent of the hay crop has been cut; 72 per cent has been baled or put into silage. Ninety five per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and five per cent is rated as fair. Producers are furthest advanced in crop districts 2A and 3ASE, where 93 per cent of the hay crop has been cut.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are reported as 14 per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate and 24 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 63 per cent adequate and 29 per cent short. Crop districts 2A and 3ASE are reporting 55 and 49 per cent, respectively, short of topsoil moisture on crop land.

The majority of crop damage is due to wind and hail. Hail damage was reported in the Moose Jaw and Marquis areas.

Swathing of fall rye and canola has just nicely started. A few fields of lentils have been combined. Crop conditions vary throughout the region, depending on the spring's excess moisture and seeding date. Shallow-rooted crops in some parts of the region are showing signs of stress due to the small amount of rain that has been received over the past several weeks. Producers are busy hauling grain and getting harvesting equipment ready.

 


 

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

 

Precipitation in the region ranged from nil to 19 mm. The Mossbank area reported 16 mm, the Eyebrow area 12 mm, the Cadillac and Maple Creek areas 5 mm, the Stewart Valley area 19 mm, the Tyner area 6 mm and the Leader area 7 mm. Most areas in crop districts 3ASW and 3BS reported no rain for the week.

Producers made progress with haying, and now have 88 per cent of the hay crop cut. Seventy-six per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Ninety-seven per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and three per cent is rated as poor. Producers in crop districts 4B and 3BN are furthest advanced in haying, and have 96 and 93 per cent, respectively, of the hay crop cut.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and 27 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 80 per cent adequate and 20 per cent short. Crop districts 3ASW and 3BS are reporting 62 and 37 per cent short in crop land topsoil moisture, respectively.

Producers have started swathing fall and spring cereals, canola and mustard. Pulse crops are coming into maturity and some producers have started to desiccate these crops.  

The majority of crop damage is due to hail, wind, insects and disease. Hail damage ranging from minimal to total was reported in many areas of the region. High winds  damaged buildings and blew hay swaths around. Crops that were seeded under excess moisture conditions are showing signs of stress due to their shallow roots and lack of significant rain in the past couple of weeks. Some producers are finding pea aphid numbers high enough to warrant control in pea and lentil crops. Crop conditions vary across the region. Rust and tan spot in cereal crops are also causing damage. Cereal crop maturity ranges from early dough to just starting to head out. Oilseed crop maturity ranges from podding to early flower.

The recent warm and sunny weather has crops progressing well. Areas still need rain, however, and crops are showing some stress. Producers are busy haying, getting ready for harvest and controlling weeds in chemfallow and summerfallow.

 


 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

 

Most areas received rain in amounts ranging from nil to 36 mm. The Dysart area received 36 mm, the Jedburgh area 26 mm, the Kelliher area 27 mm, the Rama area 20 mm, the Kuroki area 17 mm, the Bethune area 23 mm, the Kenaston area 12 mm and the Leroy area 7 mm.

Producers made progress with haying, and now have 89 per cent of the hay crop cut. Seventy-two per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Ninety-one per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and nine per cent is rated as fair. Haying is furthest advanced in crop districts 5A and 6A, where 92 per cent of the crop has been cut.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as seven per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and nine per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and 12 per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is due to hail, wind and disease. Hail damage was reported in many areas, including Stockholm, Ituna, Dysart, Rama, Sturgis, Bethune, Imperial and Leroy.

Some areas welcomed the rain to help fill the crops, and many reporters are indicating that crops and haying are progressing well. A few pulse crops have been desiccated and many should be ready to desiccate in the next week or two. Harvest for most producers is still three to four weeks away. Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Spotty thunderstorms resulted in precipitation ranging from nil to 41 mm. The Outlook area recorded 7 mm, the Arelee are 41 mm, the Kindersley area 20 mm, the Netherhill area 12 mm, the Tramping Lake area 6 mm, the Luseland area 28 mm and the Major area 35 mm. 

Good progress was made in haying, and 91 per cent of the hay crop has been cut. Seventy-five per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. The majority of the hay crop is being rated as good to excellent in quality. Haying is furthest advanced in crop districts 6B and 7A, where 94 per cent of the crop has been cut.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as six per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate, 13 per cent short and four per cent very short.

The majority of crop damage is due to wind, hail and insects. Hail damage was reported in the Outlook, Luseland and Major areas. Producers in some areas are controlling aphids in peas and lentils. The majority of the crops are starting to turn. Swathing of winter and spring cereals, canola and mustard has just started. Pulse crops are being desiccated.

Hot, dry weather accelerated crop maturity in some areas; in other areas, the heat has caused stress on flowering crops. Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Most areas reported rain in amounts ranging from trace to 31 mm. The Porcupine Plain area received 12 mm, the Codette area 30 mm, the Nipawin area 18 mm, the Bruno area 11 mm, the Melfort area 17 mm, the Birch Hills area 31 mm, the Prince Albert area 6 mm and the Garrick area 15 mm.

Despite the rain, good haying progress has been made, and 88 per cent of the hay crop has been cut. Sixty-seven per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Ninety-four per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and six per cent is rated as fair. The quality of some of the hay has been reduced by exposure to rain. Haying is furthest advanced in Crop District 8B, where 91 per cent of the crop has been cut.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 10 per cent surplus and 90 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and two per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is due to hail and wind. Hail damage was reported in the Porcupine Plain, Tisdale and Nipawin areas. Loonie-sized hail in the Porcupine Plain area caused about 25 per cent damage to some of the crops. Recent warm weather and moisture have helped advance and fill crops in some areas. Winter cereals and some spring cereals are starting to turn, and the oilseeds have finished flowering for the most part. Farmers are busy haying, scouting crops and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Precipitation in the region ranged in amount from nil to 64 mm. The majority of the rain fell in Crop District 9B, and most areas received over 15 mm.  The Duck Lake area received 12 mm, the Neilburg area 17 mm, the Turtleford area 26 mm, the Frenchman Butte area 64 mm, the Meadow Lake area 42 mm, the Rapid View area 16 mm and the Pierceland area 21 mm.

Rain and thunderstorms over the past couple of weeks have slowed haying and diminished hay quality in some areas. Meadow Lake has recorded 433 mm of rain since April 1. This is the highest cumulative amount of precipitation reported in the Crop Report for 2011. (The Mankota area in the southwest is in a distant second place, with 424 mm of rain since April 1). Progress was made in haying despite the rain, and producers in the region now have 64 per cent of the hay crop cut. Thirty-four per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Fifty-seven per cent of the hay has been rated as good to excellent, 36 per cent is rated fair and seven per cent is rated poor in quality. Crop District 9AW has 82 per cent of the hay crop cut, while Crop District 9B has 53 per cent of the hay crop cut.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are six per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Pasture and hay land conditions are three per cent surplus, 95 per cent adequate and two per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is due to hail, wind, flooding and insects. Hail was reported in the Duck Lake, Neilburg, Turtleford and Pierceland areas. Grasshoppers were responsible for the majority of insect-related crop damage. High winds caused some crops to lodge.

Although crops are behind normal in development, the warm weather has significantly helped advance maturity. Producers are busy haying and monitoring fields for insects and diseases.

 


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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