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       Sunday, October 22, 2017

One year ago
Less than one per cent of the 2011 crop had been seeded. A late season snow storm dropped significant amounts of precipitation in the south east region.

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Two per cent of the 2012 crop has been seeded, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Provincially, seven per cent of the peas, three per cent of the lentils and two per cent of the spring wheat and durum have been seeded to date. The southwestern region has six per cent of the acres seeded, while the southeast has three per cent.

Rain has been recorded in most regions of the province during the past week, delaying seeding operations. The week's precipitation has ranged from trace amounts to over 50 mm. Most of the areas in the southwestern, west-central and northwestern regions that were indicating dry conditions last week received significant moisture this week. 

Cropland topsoil moisture across the province is rated as 16 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, five per cent short and one per cent very short.

Crop reporters are indicating that, although the majority of winter wheat and fall rye crops are in good condition, four per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the fall rye have some winter or spring weather-related damage.

Farmers are busy seeding, calving and controlling weeds.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Three per cent of the 2012 crop has been seeded. Producers have seven per cent of the peas, four per cent of the lentils and one per cent of wheat and durum in the ground. At this point, crop reporters are indicating six per cent of the acres will not be seeded this spring due to excess moisture issues carried over from the past couple of years.

Three days of rain has left resulted in significant moisture in some areas, delaying seeding operations. The Frobisher area received 34 mm of rain, the Gainsborough area 19 mm, the Broadview area 25 mm, the Windthorst area 12 mm, the Weyburn area 9 mm, the Moose Jaw area 29 mm, the Wilcox area 6 mm and the Radville area 12 mm. The Tantallon and Indian Head areas have recorded the greatest amount of precipitation for the region since April 1 (95 and 94 mm, respectively). Some crop reporters have indicated warm and dry weather is needed as fields cannot handle much more precipitation before excess moisture becomes an issue again.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 34 per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate and two per cent short. In CDs 1A and 1B, 76 and 70 per cent, respectively, of the cropland has surplus topsoil moisture. Pasture and hay land topsoil moisture conditions are 26 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate and one per cent short.

The majority of winter wheat and fall rye crops are in good condition. There are a few reports of winter damage and flooding damage from last fall. Four per cent of the winter wheat and three per cent of the fall rye have incurred some winter or spring damage.

The wet conditions have caused some calving issues for livestock producers.

Farmers are busy working fields, seeding and calving.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Six per cent of the 2012 crop is in the ground. Thirteen per cent of the field peas, four per cent of the lentils, three per cent of the durum and two per cent of the spring wheat have been seeded. At this point, crop reporters are indicating two per cent of the acres will not be seeded due to excess moisture issues.

Significant amounts of rain, ranging from 2 mm to 59 mm, fell on most areas of the region, helping to recharge the once-dry soil. The Glentworth area reported 23 mm of rain, the Lisieux area 9 mm, the Eyebrow and Central Butte areas 22 mm, the Spring Valley area 12 mm, the Cadillac area 55 mm, the Glenbain area 27 mm, the Stewart Valley area 28 mm, the Gull Lake area 59 mm and the Hazlet area 44 mm. The amount of rainfall has varied widely across the region.  Since April 1, the Chaplin area has received 18 mm and the Cadillac area has received 99 mm of precipitation.

Crop reporters have indicated cropland topsoil moisture conditions are six per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture moisture conditions are four per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and six per cent short.

The majority of winter wheat and fall rye crops have come out of the winter looking good. Only four per cent of the winter wheat and one per cent of the fall rye have any winter damage or flooding damage from last fall.

Farmers are busy seeding, controlling weeds, calving and getting machinery ready.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Farmers are just getting started in the fields and have one per cent of the total 2012 crop seeded. Six per cent of the field peas and five per cent of the spring wheat have been seeded. At this time, six per cent of the cropland in the region is not expected to be seeded due to excess moisture problems.

Rain fell in varying amounts over the past week, with CD 6A receiving most of the moisture. The Abernethy area reported 12 mm of rain, the Goodeve area 10 mm, the Raymore area 4 mm, the Foam Lake area 9 mm, the Imperial area 26 mm, the Kenaston area 24 mm, the Earl Grey area 5 mm and the Kuroki area reported trace amounts.  Since April 1, the Goodeve and Elfros areas have received 128 and 108 mm of precipitation, respectively. 

Crop reporters in CD 5A are indicating field conditions are quite wet and the recent rain has further delayed seeding. Most fields in CD 5B were in good condition for seeding, however the recent rain has postponed seeding in some areas. Most crop reporters in CD 6A are glad to see the moisture, as topsoil was quite dry.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 26 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and three per cent short. In CD 5A, 62 per cent of the cropland has surplus of topsoil moisture.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 32 per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate and six per cent short.

The majority of winter wheat and fall rye crops have come out of the winter looking good. There are a few reports of winter damage and flooding damage from last fall. The region is reporting four and two per cent winter or spring damage on winter wheat and fall rye, respectively.

Farmers are busy cleaning grain, working on machinery and calving.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Farmers in the region have one per cent of this year's total crop in the ground. Three per cent of the field peas are seeded. Producers have started seeding lentils, wheat and durum.

Significant rainfall during the past week has helped recharge dry soil in much of the region. The Perdue area reported 35 mm of rain, the Hanley area 14 mm, the Dinsmore area 17 mm, the Kindersley area 56 mm, the Harris area 38 mm, the D'Arcy area 31 mm, the Luseland area 48 mm, the Landis area 34 mm and the Kerrobert area 21 mm. 

Crop reporters are indicating cropland topsoil moisture conditions are five per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are three per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and five per cent short.

Winter cereals look to be in good condition for the most part. The region is reporting four per cent winter or spring damage on winter wheat and fall rye.

Farmers are busy harrowing, applying anhydrous ammonia, controlling weeds and working on equipment.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Producers have started seeding peas and wheat in a few areas in the region.

Varying amounts of rain fell in the region this past week. The Tisdale and Melfort areas received 5 mm of rain, the Porcupine Plain area 3 mm, the Vonda area 12 mm, the Prince Albert area 18 mm and the Garrick area 3 mm.  

Twenty-three per cent of the cropland has surplus topsoil moisture, while 77 per cent has adequate moisture.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 18 per cent surplus and 82 per cent adequate.  Crop reporters in CD 9AE are indicating 60 per cent of the cropland has surplus  topsoil moisture.

The majority of the limited number of acres that were put into winter cereals last fall look to be in good condition. The region is reporting three per cent winter or spring damage on winter wheat.

Farmers are busy calving, preparing machinery and controlling weeds.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

A few producers have started seeding. There are reports of wheat and canola being put into the ground.

The region received some much-anticipated moisture this past week, alleviating the dry conditions in some areas. The Radisson area received 17 mm of rain, the Speers area 22 mm, the Hafford area 26 mm, the North Battleford area 33 mm, the Edam area 19 mm, the Frenchman Butte area 49 mm, the Pierceland area 26 mm and the Meadow Lake area 10 mm. In some areas in the northern part of the region soil is fairly wet, which will delay seeding somewhat.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate and 11 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 82 per cent adequate, 13 per cent short and five per cent very short.

The majority of the limited number of acres put into winter cereals last fall look to be in good condition. Only two per cent of the winter wheat and one per cent of the fall rye have experienced any winter or spring damage.

Farmers are busy calving, heavy harrowing, cleaning grain and doing pre-seeding field work.


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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