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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

One year ago
Eight per cent of the 2011 hay crop had been cut and two per cent was baled or put into silage. Seventy one per cent of the hay crop was rated as good to excellent in quality.

Follow the 2012 Crop Report on Twitter @SKGovAg

Saskatchewan livestock producers have 12 per cent of the 2012 hay crop cut and three per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.  Eighty-nine per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality.

In terms of crop development, 61 per cent of the fall cereals are in the heading stage; 61 per cent of the spring cereals are in the jointed to shot-blade stage; 50 per cent of the canola and mustard are in the rosette stage and 24 per cent in the flowering stage; 69 per cent of the pulses are in the vegetative stage and 27 per cent in the flowering stage; and 48 per cent of the flax is in the seedling stage and 42 per cent in the stem-elongation stage.  Thanks to the recent warm weather, the majority of crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 27 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate and five per cent short.

Thunderstorms in some areas produced strong winds and varying amounts of precipitation.  Hail and tornadoes were also reported.  Flooding, wind, hail, insects and disease are causing the majority of crop damage.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting crops and spraying for diseases and weeds.

Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation Report - July 5

The deadline to report seeded greenfeed acres is July 5.

The deadline to meet and maintain minimum summerfallow coverage requirements for green manure crops is July 11 in the brown and dark brown soil zones, and July 25 in the black and grey soil zones.

Under the Organic Reseeding Benefit, July 15 is the deadline to reseed.

 


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Warm and moist weather has helped improve crop conditions; however, crop reporters are indicating that many areas experienced a week of wild weather starting Tuesday with thunderstorms, hail and even a tornado touchdown near Moose Jaw. Strong winds in the Moose Jaw, Grenfell, Indian Head, Vibank and Moosomin areas caused damage to farm buildings, shelterbelts and grain bins. Hail was reported in the Indian Head and Vibank areas.

Precipitation ranged from 2 mm to 60 mm, with the average being 24 mm. Above-average precipitation was received in Crop District 2B, which includes Moose Jaw (60 mm), Indian Head (48 mm), Wilcox (59 mm) and Vibank (41 mm). 

Livestock producers have 31 per cent of the hay crop cut and 10 per cent baled or put into silage. Sixty-five per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality; however, there are many reports of alfalfa weevil damage, particularly in pure stands. Mixed stands look better. Pasture conditions are rated at 90 per cent good to excellent, while supplies of livestock water are reported as 99 per cent adequate. Some livestock producers in the Whitewood area are still seeding greenfeed crops.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 22 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate and 12 per cent short. In crop districts 1B and 2A, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 21 and 35 per cent surplus, respectively. In crop districts 1A and 3ASE, hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 23 and 25 per cent short, respectively.

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

The region experienced thunderstorms which included hail and strong winds in many areas. Precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 57 mm, with the average being 13 mm. Above-average precipitation was received in Crop District 3BN, which includes Lucky Lake (43 mm), Webb (39 mm) and Rush Lake (27 mm). Other areas that received large amounts of precipitation include Maple Creek (57 mm), Leader (30 mm) and Mortlach (45 mm).

Severe weather caused crop damage and delayed spraying in some areas. There are still some areas that have not received precipitation and are in need of moisture to advance the crop.

Livestock producers have 16 per cent of the hay crop cut and three per cent baled or put into silage. Ninety per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. Pasture conditions are rated at 93 per cent good to excellent, while livestock water supplies are reported as 96 per cent adequate.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 10 per cent surplus, 87 per cent adequate and three per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate, seven per cent short and one per cent very short. In Crop District 4A, 16 per cent of the cropland is reported to be short of topsoil moisture, and 14 per cent of the hay land and pasture is short of moisture..

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases. Haying is in full swing in those parts of the region where excess moisture is not an issue.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Precipitation ranged from 2 mm to 50 mm, with the average being 25 mm. Crop District 5A received an average of 36.7 mm of precipitation), and areas such as Goodeve (50 mm), Ituna (43 mm), Stockholm (44 mm) and Langenburg (48 mm) received significantly more. Other areas that received large amounts of rainfall include Kamsack (31 mm), Foam Lake (40 mm), Lumsden (29 mm), Bethune (27 mm), Kenaston (35 mm) and Bradwell (37 mm).

Livestock producers have just over two per cent of the hay crop cut and less than one per cent baled or put into silage. Ninety-three per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. Pasture conditions are rated at 92 per cent good to excellent, livestock water supplies are 100 per cent adequate.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 28 per cent surplus and 72 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 26 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and three per cent short.

Crop reporters are indicating that severe thunderstorms and plough winds caused severe damage to shelterbelts, buildings and grain bins in some areas. Many areas are experiencing wet soil conditions, causing poor crop growth and delaying operations. Recent warm weather is reported to have helped advance crops and allowed some producers in areas that received little rain to continue with spraying operations.

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Livestock producers have four per cent of the hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage. One-hundred per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. Pasture conditions are rated at 99 per cent good to excellent, while livestock water supplies are reported as 99 per cent adequate.

Many parts of the region received hail, strong winds and even small tornadoes which caused damage to buildings and grain bins. Precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 55 mm, with the average being 19 mm. Large amounts of precipitation fell in the Macklin (55 mm), Cando (25 mm), Marengo (38 mm), Perdue (34 mm), Hanley (33.5 mm), Outlook (36 mm) and Conquest (35 mm) areas.

Wet soil conditions and strong winds have contributed to poor crop growth and delayed weed- and disease-control operations. Many crop reporters are indicating that warm and sunny days are needed to speed crop growth.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 42 per cent surplus and 58 per cent adequate on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 22 per cent surplus and 78 per cent adequate.  

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Livestock producers have five per cent of the hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage. One-hundred per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. Pasture conditions are rated as 82 per cent good to excellent, while livestock water supplies are reported as 100 per cent adequate.

Extreme wind and rain caused damage to crops and property. Precipitation ranged from 2 mm (Humboldt) to 69 mm (Codette), with the average being 38 mm.  Areas that received well-above the regional average include Tisdale (47 mm), Nipawin (50 mm), Kinistino (62 mm), Birch Hills (52 mm) and Prince Albert (65 mm). With the wet soil conditions, crops look poor, particularly canola, and many producers are hoping for dry, sunny weather. 

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 48 per cent surplus and 52 per cent adequate. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as 34 per cent surplus and 66 per cent adequate.

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Livestock producers have less than one per cent of the hay crop cut. One-hundred per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. Pasture conditions are rated as 98 per cent good to excellent, while livestock water supplies are reported as 100 per cent adequate.

Precipitation ranged from 4 mm (North Battleford) to 37 mm (Pierceland), with the average being18 mm. Areas that received well-above the regional average include Duck Lake (26 mm), Neilburg (27 mm), St. Walburg (33 mm) and Turtleford (32 mm).  Some areas in the region have experienced warm weather and crops are looking good; however, other parts have had stormy weather and dry conditions are needed to allow producers to continue with spraying and haying operations.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 13 per cent surplus and 87 per cent adequate. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as seven per cent surplus and 93 per cent adequate.

Crop damage is attributed to flooding, wind, hail, insects and diseases.


Saskatchewan Crop Development (per cent at each stage)

Spring Cereals

Emerge

Tillering

Jointed

Shot blade

Heading

July 2/12 Provincial average

4

32

38

23

3

Southeast

3

34

38

20

5

Southwest

3

32

37

24

5

East central

8

37

33

21

2

West central

2

38

40

18

1

Northeast

4

23

37

33

2

Northwest

3

23

42

29

3

Flax

Pre-emerge

Emerge

Seedling

Stem ext

Flowering

July 2/12 Provincial average

0

6

49

43

2

Southeast

1

4

49

42

5

Southwest

0

3

46

49

2

East central

0

8

50

43

1

West central

0

7

69

24

0

Northeast

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Northwest

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Canola & Mustard

Emerge

Seedling

Rosette

Flowering

Podding

July 2/12 Provincial average

3

23

50

24

0

Southeast

2

13

49

36

0

Southwest

1

7

37

54

2

East central

6

30

46

19

0

West central

1

21

58

20

0

Northeast

3

28

49

20

0

Northwest

1

21

58

20

0

Pulse Crops

Pre-emerge

Emerge

Vegetative

Flowering

Podding

July 2/12 Provincial average

0

4

69

27

1

Southeast

0

9

76

14

1

Southwest

0

3

53

43

2

East central

1

3

72

24

0

West central

0

4

87

9

0

Northeast

0

1

86

13

0

Northwest

0

1

84

14

0

Fall Crops

Jointed

Shot blade

Heading

Dough

Ripe

July 2/12 Provincial average

1

9

61

28

1

Southeast

0

6

60

34

1

Southwest

1

9

61

29

0

East central

5

14

69

13

0

West central

0

13

57

30

0

Northeast

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Northwest

0

65

35

0

0

 


 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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