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       Friday, October 20, 2017

One year ago

Seventy-three per cent of the hay crop had been cut with 51 per cent baled or put into silage. Eighty-six per cent of the hay crop was rated as good to excellent in quality.

Follow the 2012 Crop Report on Twitter @SKGovAg

Saskatchewan livestock producers continue to make good haying progress and now have 79 per cent of the hay crop cut.  Sixty-one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.  Eighty-four per cent of the provincial hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. 

Haying progress varies across the province.  Southwestern Saskatchewan has 89 per cent of the hay cut; southeastern Saskatchewan has 87 per cent cut; the west-central region has 67 per cent cut; the east-central region has 75 per cent cut; the northwest has 62 per cent cut; and the northeast has 81 per cent cut.

Thunderstorms rolled through some areas of the province, bringing varying amounts of precipitation.  Crops are advancing quickly with the warm and dry weather and the majority of them are in good condition.  Disease, insects, wind and hail are causing the majority of crop damage.

Cropland top soil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate, 14 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 20 per cent short and one per cent very short. 

Farmers are busy haying, controlling diseases and insects and getting ready for harvest.

 

 


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

The recent warm weather has advanced crops and the harvest of some winter wheat crops is underway.  Later-seeded crops are showing signs of crop stress due to heat, wind, disease and insects, but, overall, the crops are in good condition.  The region received rainfall last week that ranged from trace amounts to 39 mm in the Weyburn area.  The Indian Head area received 31 mm of rainfall, the Kisbey area 27 mm, the Windthorst area 17 mm, the Odessa area 11 mm, the Grenfell area 10 mm and the Carnduff area 3 mm.  The Tantallon area has recorded the greatest amount of precipitation since April 1 (477 mm). 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 18 per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and 15 per cent short.  In Crop District 2B, 50 per cent of the cropland has surplus moisture while crop reporters in CD 2A are indicating that 25 per cent of the cropland is short moisture. 

Livestock producers in the southeast have 87 per cent of the hay crop cut and 74 per cent baled or put into silage.  Hay quality is rated as 11 per cent excellent, 81 per cent good and eight per cent fair.  Some alfalfa stands are severely damaged by alfalfa weevils.     

Many winter wheat crops will be ready for harvest in the next week or so and there are reports of pre-harvest chemicals being sprayed on pulses.  Heavy rains and strong winds have lodged many cereal crops but growing conditions are ideal in most of the region.  Some canola crops have been heavily affected by aster yellows.   Bertha armyworm larvae counts have been low but producers will continue to scout their fields.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, controlling insects and disease in crops and getting ready for harvest.            

 


 

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Warm temperatures are quickly advancing crops and the harvest of some winter wheat and pulse crops will soon begin.  Rain is desperately needed in some areas to help the crops recover from the recent heat stress.  The majority of the region received very little rainfall. The Rush Lake area recorded the region's greatest amount of rainfall (32 mm).  The Rockglen area received 29 mm of rain, the Kyle area 23 mm, the Gull Lake and Eyebrow areas 13 mm, the Frontier area 8 mm, the Admiral area 6 mm, the Swift Current area 4 mm and the Mortlach area 3 mm.  Eyebrow has recorded 374 mm of precipitation since April 1.     

Cropland topsoil moisture levels have improved since last week and now are rated as 53 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and two per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 48 per cent adequate, 48 short and four per cent very short.  In crop districts 3BS and 4A, 78 per cent and 85 per cent of cropland acres, respectively, are short of moisture.  In Crop District 3BS, 13 per cent of the hay land and pasture is very short of moisture.   

Livestock producers in the southwest have 89 per cent of the hay crop cut and 74 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 19 per cent excellent, 70 per cent good, eight per cent fair and three per cent poor. 

Twenty-nine per cent of the crops are showing signs of low moisture stress and will need rain.  Hail, wind, insects and disease have also contributed to crop damage this week.  Harvest of most winter cereals and pulses will begin within the next week or two if the warm weather continues.  There have been reports that some early-seeded mustard crops are already in the bin and in good condition.  Fall rye is being cut for greenfeed and some has already been baled.       

Farmers are busy finishing haying, hauling grain, spraying pre-harvest chemicals and getting ready for harvest. 

 


 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Crops are advancing quickly  due to the recent warm temperatures.  Wet conditions in some parts of the region are delaying haying and fungicide applications on crops.  Severe hailstorms and tornadoes brought varying amounts of rainfall to the region.  The Kelliher area received 38 mm of rain, the Quill Lake area 17 mm, the Dysart area 16 mm, the Craik area 15 mm, the Abernethy area 11 mm, the Bradwell area 10 mm and the Allan and Elfros areas 7 mm.  The Jedburgh area has received 430 mm of precipitation since April 1. 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as nine per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 10 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.  Crop District 5A is reporting that 25 per cent of cropland acres and 23 per cent of hay land and pasture acres have surplus moisture.     

Livestock producers have made good haying progress and now have 75 per cent of the hay crop cut.  Fifty-five per cent has been baled or put into silage.  Hay quality is rated as 12 per cent excellent, 65 per cent good and 23 per cent fair. 

There are reports of fields being sprayed for wheat midge and sclerotinia.  Producers in the many areas that received large amounts of moisture are spraying for cereal leaf diseases on later-seeded crops.  Crops are advancing, but many are still behind their normal stages of development for this time of year due to the excess moisture in the spring.  Insects, disease, hail and wind have caused most of the crop damage this week.   

Farmers are busy finishing haying, controlling disease and insects and getting equipment ready for harvest.

 


 

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

The warm temperatures are quickly advancing crop development, although some fields are still behind normal development for this time of year.  Many producers are reporting severe hail damage to both yards and crops.  Rainfall over the past week varied from trace amounts to 40 mm in the Marengo area.  The Tramping Lake area received 31 mm of rain, the Major area 30 mm, the D'Arcy area 25 mm, the Landis area 19 mm, the Perdue area 16 mm, the Biggar and Hanley areas 15 mm and the Rosthern area 4 mm.  Sonningdale has received 466 mm of precipitation since April 1.   

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 25 per cent surplus and 75 per cent adequate on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 14 per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  In Crop District 7B, 40 per cent of the cropland and 24 per cent of the hay land and pasture are reported to have surplus moisture.

Haying has progressed quickly with the warm weather, and livestock producers now have 67 per cent of the hay crop cut and 41 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 15 per cent excellent, 63 per cent good, 18 per cent fair and four per cent poor.  High humidity continues to make haying difficult.  Some of the hay that has been lying in the swath is in very poor condition and there are concerns about quality.    

Heavy rains and strong winds have lodged some cereal crops and many producers continue to spray for disease.  There are reports of fields being sprayed for fusarium head blight, sclerotinia, anthracnose and wheat midge.  Most of the crop damage this week is attributed to localized flooding, hail, wind, disease and insects.        

Producers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting equipment ready for harvest.

 


 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Heavy rains fell in some parts of the region, flooding fields and farmyards.  A tornado touched down in a farmyard near Smeaton and flattened many crops in the area.  The Tisdale region received 112 mm of rain in a matter of hours last Wednesday, bringing the total precipitation received since April 1 to 514 mm.  The Nipawin area received 100 mm of rain last week, the Garrick area 47 mm, the Arborfield area 30 mm, the Star City area 21 mm, the Birch Hills area 22 mm, the Prince Albert area 5 mm and the Bruno area 3 mm. 

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 24 per cent surplus and 76 per cent adequate. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as 11 per cent surplus and 89 per cent adequate.  Twenty-eight per cent of cropland acres in CD 8B have surplus moisture.     

Livestock producers continue to make haying progress and now have 81 per cent of the hay crop cut and 64 per cent baled or put into silage.  Hay quality is rated as 20 per cent excellent, 60 per cent good and 20 per cent fair.  There have been reports of some seed alfalfa fields being sprayed for aphids.    

Many pea and canaryseed fields are being sprayed for aphids, and some canola fields have received a fungicide application for sclerotinia.  Many canola and cereal fields in the Nipawin will soon be sprayed for armyworms since their numbers have now reached the economic threshold.  Crop damage is due to localized flooding, hail and wind from the thunderstorms.  Insects and disease have also damaged many crops.     

Producers are busy haying, controlling disease and insects and hauling grain.

    


 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The region received varying amounts of rainfall last week that, when coupled with the warm temperatures, is quickly advancing crops.  North Battleford received 50 mm of rain, the Neilburg area 25 mm, the Pierceland area 15 mm, the Barthel area 10 mm, the Duck Lake area 9 mm and the Speers area 6 mm.  Rain is still needed in some areas to help finish filling in many of the crops. 

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as seven per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and 14 per cent short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as five per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and 16 per cent short.  

Haying is advancing quickly and livestock producers now have 62 per cent of the hay crop cut and 36 per cent baled or put into silage.  Hay quality is rated as 25 per cent excellent, 56 per cent good and 19 per cent fair.  Wet conditions have delayed haying operations in some areas and there are concerns about quality due to excess moisture.   

The majority of crop damage this week is attributed to hail, wind, disease and insects.  Last weekend's heavy rains and strong winds flattened some cereal crops, but, overall, the crops are developing nicely despite the warm temperatures.  Some canola crops have severe aster yellows and many cereal fields are being sprayed for tan spot and net blotch. 

Producers are busy haying and controlling disease.


  

SK (provincial) Crop conditions - July 23, 2012

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

23

42

20

15

16

16

14

% good

67

54

64

60

65

65

62

% fair

8

4

14

23

17

15

20

% poor

1

0

2

1

1

3

2

% very poor

1

0

0

1

1

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

18

16

21

16

15

8

1

% good

57

58

62

62

61

73

95

% fair

17

23

14

19

20

18

4

% poor

6

3

3

3

3

1

0

% very poor

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

 

 

 

Southeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

20

24

20

24

14

17

11

% good

72

69

62

44

66

64

54

% fair

6

6

17

31

17

18

34

% poor

1

1

1

0

2

1

0

% very poor

1

0

0

1

1

0

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

18

2

12

12

12

5

0

% good

54

51

53

53

47

68

95

% fair

26

47

30

30

37

27

5

% poor

1

0

4

4

1

0

0

% very poor

1

0

1

1

3

0

0

 

 

 

Southwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

29

54

10

9

11

9

4

% good

55

43

67

65

60

70

72

% fair

15

3

21

24

28

20

23

% poor

1

0

2

2

1

1

1

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

5

10

16

14

11

8

0

% good

75

57

70

68

74

71

100

% fair

18

29

13

16

11

20

0

% poor

2

4

1

2

4

1

0

% very poor

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

East-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

29

42

21

35

15

15

18

% good

61

57

65

59

69

68

67

% fair

8

1

13

6

14

13

10

% poor

1

0

1

0

2

3

1

% very poor

1

0

0

0

0

1

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

16

34

32

27

25

22

N/A

% good

60

62

54

62

62

75

N/A

% fair

17

4

12

11

8

3

N/A

% poor

5

0

2

0

3

0

N/A

% very poor

2

0

0

0

2

0

N/A

 

 

 

West-central

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

39

18

21

18

11

16

13

% good

59

77

64

62

73

66

72

% fair

2

5

13

19

15

15

14

% poor

0

0

1

1

1

2

1

% very poor

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

19

21

20

18

19

0

11

% good

61

57

65

55

66

93

79

% fair

13

20

12

22

14

4

10

% poor

6

2

2

5

1

3

0

% very poor

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

Northeast

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

11

0

20

55

17

16

36

% good

84

100

60

30

57

52

34

% fair

5

0

15

15

22

20

19

% poor

0

0

4

0

1

10

11

% very poor

0

0

1

0

3

2

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

22

N/A

16

0

6

N/A

N/A

% good

39

N/A

53

100

53

N/A

N/A

% fair

21

N/A

13

0

27

N/A

N/A

% poor

14

N/A

15

0

14

N/A

N/A

% very poor

4

N/A

3

0

0

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

Northwest

 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

% excellent

0

0

28

N/A

27

20

0

% good

93

92

66

N/A

66

72

100

% fair

7

8

5

N/A

7

8

0

% poor

0

0

1

N/A

0

0

0

% very poor

0

0

0

N/A

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

% excellent

25

N/A

40

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

% good

65

N/A

54

100

N/A

N/A

N/A

% fair

8

N/A

6

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

% poor

2

N/A

0

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

% very poor

0

N/A

0

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

 


 



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