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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago
Eighty-four per cent of the hay crop had been cut with 67 per cent baled or put into silage. Harvest was just beginning.

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Saskatchewan livestock producers made good haying progress last week and now have 88 per cent of the hay crop cut.  Seventy-six per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.  Eighty-nine per cent of the provincial hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality. 

Haying progress varies across the province.  Southwestern Saskatchewan has 96 per cent of the hay cut; southeastern Saskatchewan has 92 per cent cut; the west-central region has 80 per cent cut; the east-central region has 89 per cent cut; the northwest has 76 per cent cut; and the northeast has 88 per cent cut.

Provincial pasture conditions are rated as 23 per cent excellent, 57 per cent good, 17 per cent fair and three per cent poor.  Livestock water availability is adequate. 

Many areas of the province received several inches of rainfall this past week that has helped to alleviate crop stress.  Top soil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 12 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 14 per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate, 20 per cent short and three per cent very short. 

Producers are starting to harvest winter cereals and pulses in some regions of the province.  Farmers are desiccating pulses and swathing canola and mustard in some areas.  The majority of crop damage this week is due to disease, insects, wind and drought.    

 


 

Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Haying continues in the southeastern region and livestock producers now have 92 per cent of the hay crop cut and 86 per cent baled or put into silage. Ninety-six per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent. Pasture conditions are rated as 18 per cent excellent, 67 per cent good, 12 per cent fair and three per cent poor. Ninety-nine per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their livestock.

Precipitation ranged from trace amounts in some areas to 50 mm in the Indian Head region. The Frobisher area received 13 mm of rainfall, the Manor area 43 mm, the Stoughton area 25 mm, the Weyburn area 35 mm, the Odessa area 25 mm, the Radville area 7 mm and the Tantallon area 4 mm. Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 167 mm (Radville area) to 481 mm (Tantallon).  Tornadoes, strong winds and heavy rains have lodged many crops.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as eight per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and one per cent very short. In Crop District 2A, 33 per cent of the cropland has surplus moisture while CD 3ASE is reporting 70 per cent of cropland  is short of moisture.

Harvest is now underway in the southeastern region. Some winter cereal and pulse fields have been combined with many other fields ready for harvest within the next few weeks. Many crops are showing stress from the high temperatures, and yields are anticipated to be lower than normal in some areas. Swathing of some canola crops will begin soon and there are reports of a higher-than-usual incidence of aster yellows. The majority of crop damage this week is due to heat stress, diseases, insects, wind and localized flooding.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, controlling insects and disease and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Livestock producers made good haying progress this past week and now have 96 per cent of the hay crop cut and 89 per cent baled or put into silage. Ninety-seven per cent of it is in good to excellent condition. Pasture conditions are rated as 16 per cent excellent, 45 per cent good, 32 per cent fair and seven per cent poor. Ninety-eight per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their livestock.

The majority of the southwest received trace amounts of rain last week, which has further stressed both crops and pastures. The Stewart Valley area received 29 mm of rainfall last week, the Kyle area 22 mm, the Gull Lake area 11 mm, the Big Beaver area 1 mm, the Mortlach area 5 mm, the Central Butte area 10 mm, the Kincaid area 12 mm and the Vanguard area 4 mm. Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 182 mm (Bengough area) to 374 mm (Eyebrow area).

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 51 per cent adequate, 43 per cent short and six per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 49 per cent adequate, 42 short and nine per cent very short. In crop districts 3BS and 4B, 82 per cent and 68 per cent of cropland acres, respectively, are short of moisture. In Crop District 4A, 20 per cent of the hay land and pasture is very short of moisture.

Harvest has begun, with pulses, winter cereals and mustard being combined. Early reports are indicating that some crop yields will be less than normal due to the recent hot temperatures. Crop reporters are indicating that rain is needed because 51 per cent of the crops in the southwestern region are suffering from low moisture stress.

Crops continue to advance and most producers will begin harvest in the coming weeks. Many farmers are desiccating pulses and some lentil fields will soon be swathed. There have been reports of late-seeded fields being sprayed for wheat midge and bertha armyworms. Strong winds combined with root rot in some fields have lodged many crops.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, spraying pre-harvest chemicals and getting ready for harvest.


 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Livestock producers in the east-central region have made good progress haying and now have 89 per cent of the crop cut and 72 per cent of the crop baled or put into silage. Eighty-three per cent is in good to excellent condition while 17 per cent is in fair condition. Pasture conditions are rated as 21 per cent excellent, 61 per cent good, 17 per cent fair and one per cent poor. One hundred per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

The region received varying amounts of rainfall this past week, helping many crops recover from the recent heat. The Ituna area received 81 mm of rain last week, the Jedburgh area 49 mm, the Raymore area 24 mm, the Abernethy area 44 mm, the Kamsack area 30 mm, the Foam Lake area 43 mm, the Kuroki area 13 mm, the Kelvington area 55 mm, the Earl Grey area 18 mm, the Craik area 29 mm and the Jansen area 23 mm. Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 231 mm (Quill Lake area) to 479 mm (Jedburgh area).

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 10 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and nine per cent short. Crop District 5A is reporting that 40 per cent of cropland and 29 per cent of hay land and pasture have surplus moisture.

Most of the crop damage this week is attributed to disease, insects, wind and localized flooding. Most canola crops have high levels of aster yellows.. Farmers are spraying for diseases in all crops and some canola crops may be sprayed for bertha armyworms in the coming weeks. There have been reports of rust in many wheat fields. Strong winds and heavy rains in parts of the region have lodged fields and some low lying areas are now flooded out. Harvest will begin in the coming weeks on earlier-seeded crops.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, controlling disease and insects and getting equipment ready for harvest.

 


 

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Haying continues in the west-central region. Eighty per cent of the hay crop has been cut and 72 per cent has been baled or put into silage.  Seventeen per cent of the hay is in excellent condition, 58 per cent is in good condition and 25 per cent is in fair condition. Quality remains an issue due to a higher-than-normal number of rain-showers. Pasture conditions are rated as 58 per cent excellent, 41 per cent good and one per cent fair. One hundred per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

Rainfall varied greatly in the region, from trace amounts to 67 mm in the Macklin area. The Dinsmore area received 54 mm of rain this past week, the Perdue area 20 mm, the Marengo area 22 mm, the Kindersley area 38 mm, the Luseland area 17 mm and the Biggar area 31 mm. Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 266 mm (Kindersley area) to 488 mm (Sonningdale area).

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 26 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and two per cent short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 18 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and three per cent short.

Many canola crops have damage from aster yellows and many producers are now scouting for bertha armyworms. Some fields have sustained significant disease damage from sclerotinia, rust and leaf spot diseases. Farmers are spraying for aphids in pulses and cereals. Hail and strong winds have damaged many crops and there have been reports of some farmers losing a significant amount of acres due to the storm that passed through some areas of the region last Friday. Crops are progressing well and there are indications that harvest will begin soon with earlier-seeded pulses and winter cereals.

Producers are busy haying, controlling disease and insects and getting equipment ready for harvest.

 


 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Livestock producers now have 88 per cent of the hay crop cut and 68 per cent baled or put into silage. Ten per cent of the hay crop is in excellent condition while 90 per cent is in good condition. Pasture conditions are rated as 26 per cent excellent, 65 per cent good and nine percent fair. One hundred per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

Heavy rains fell in some parts of the region this past week, increasing the disease pressure in many areas. The Arborfield area received 91 mm of rain, the Porcupine Plain area 24 mm, the Humboldt area 33 mm, the Bruno area 25 mm, the Garrick area 23 mm and the Kinistino area 39 mm. Since April 1, cumulative rainfall in the region has ranged from 303 mm (Garrick area) to 455 mm (Kinistino area).

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 27 per cent surplus and 73 per cent adequate. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as 18 per cent surplus and 82 per cent adequate. Thirty-three per cent of cropland acres in CD 8B have surplus moisture.

The majority of crop damage this week is due to heavy rain, insects and disease. Many producers are spraying for leaf diseases and sclerotinia. There have also been reports of staghead in some canola fields. Aphids are being controlled in many canaryseed and flax fields while armyworms are approaching the economic threshold level in some areas. Excess moisture in some fields and access roads is becoming a concern for producers, although there are indications that harvest will not begin for several weeks.

Producers are busy haying, controlling disease and insects and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Haying continues to progress and livestock producers now have 76 per cent of the hay crop cut and 60 per cent baled or put into silage. Eighty per cent of the hay is in good to excellent condition while 20 per cent is in fair condition. Pasture conditions are rated as six per cent excellent, 74 per cent good, 18 per cent fair and two per cent poor. Ninety-eight per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

Heavy rains and strong winds have lodged many crops. The Radisson area received 26 mm of rainfall this past week, the Speers area 44 mm, the Glaslyn area 34 mm, the Turtleford area 16 mm, the St. Walburg area 44 mm, the Meadow Lake area 75 mm and the Rapid View area 20 mm. Since April 1, cumulative rainfall in the region has ranged from 183 mm (Dorintosh area) to 410 mm (Radisson area).

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as four per cent surplus, 88 per cent adequate, seven per cent short and one per cent very short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is rated as one per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate, 12 per cent short and one per cent very short.

The majority of crop damage this week is due to wind, excess moisture, insects and diseases. Many farmers are spraying for leaf diseases and sclerotinia. Hail fell on some canola crops and damage varies. Aster yellows damage is a concern in some areas. Some fields could use another rainfall to help advance crops.

Producers are busy haying, controlling disease and insects and getting ready for harvest.


 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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