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       Friday, October 20, 2017

One year ago
Ninety-one per cent of the hay crop had been cut with 79 per cent baled or put into silage. Less than one per cent of the crop had been combined.

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Saskatchewan livestock producers continue to make good haying progress and now have 92 per cent of the hay crop cut.  Eighty-one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.  Eighty-three per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality, 14 per cent is rated as fair and three per cent is reported as poor quality.    

Haying progress varies across the province with 96 per cent cut in the southeast, 98 per cent in the southwest, 93 per cent in the east-central region, 88 per cent in the west-central region, 91 per cent in the northeast and 77 per cent in the northwest.

Eighty-seven per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage in the southeast, 93 per cent in the southwest, 81 per cent in the east-central and northeastern regions, 74 per cent in the west-central region and 60 per cent in the northwest.

One per cent of the provincial crop has now been combined and three per cent has been swathed or is ready to straight combine.  The five-year (2007-2011) provincial average for this time of year is two per cent combined and four per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.  Provincially, 28 per cent of the winter wheat, 23 per cent of the fall rye, six per cent of the peas, three per cent of the lentils and one per cent of the mustard has been combined.  Two per cent of the canola and five per cent of the mustard has been swathed. 

The majority of crop damage this week is attributed to insects, disease, hail and localized flooding.  Severe hail storms and heavy rain were reported in some regions.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 11 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate, 14 per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate, 18 per cent short and seven per cent very short.

Farmers are busy finishing haying, controlling insects and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Rainfall this past week was welcomed in most areas to help alleviate the heat stress on many crops, although some earlier-seeded crops are expected to yield less than was anticipated due to lack of moisture.  Some areas had not received a significant rainfall since June.  Hail  fell on some parts and has lodged crops.  The Frobisher area received 3 mm of precipitation this past week, the Wawota area 17 mm, the Whitewood area 32 mm, the Grenfell area 26 mm, the Weyburn area 18 mm, the Vibank area 15 mm, the Indian Head area 23 mm, the Marquis area 14 mm and the Radville area 20 mm.  According to the Crop Report precipitation information, the Tantallon area has the second highest cumulative rainfall in the province since April 1 (521 mm).  In contrast, the Radville area has the lowest cumulative rainfall in the province (179 mm).

Haying is nearing completion.  Ninety-six per cent of the hay crop has been cut and 87 per cent has been baled or put into silage.  Ninety-five per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and five per cent is rated as fair.  Crop districts 2A and 2B are reporting 100 per cent and 64 per cent, respectively, of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage.

The warm weather has allowed producers to start harvest.  Forty-four per cent of the winter wheat, 37 per cent of the fall rye, one per cent of the barley, four per cent of the lentils and eight per cent of the peas have been combined.  Eight per cent of the canola has been swathed.  Crop conditions and crop staging vary throughout the region, depending on the degree of springtime excess moisture and seeding date.    

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops , due to varying crop stages, disease and the lack of moisture in some areas.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 55 bu/ac, spring wheat 37 bu/ac, durum 37 bu/ac, oats 70 bu/ac, barley 60 bu/ac, fall rye 48 bu/ac, flax 20 bu/ac, canola 30 bu/ac, mustard 972 lb/ac, sunflowers 1650 lb/ac, lentils 1374 lb/ac, peas 33 bu/ac, canaryseed 1148 lb/ac and chickpeas 2700 lb/ac.

Topsoil moisture rating on cropland is reported as nine per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and 15 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate, 23 per cent short and one per cent very short.  Crop District 2A is reporting that 33 per cent of cropland, hay land and pasture have surplus moisture.

Crop damage this week is due to insects, disease, wind and localized flooding.  Aster yellows, bertha armyworm and sclerotinia are expected to reduce crop yields in some fields.

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales, desiccating pulses and combining.

 


 

Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Warm temperatures and lack of moisture in the southwest has allowed harvest to continue.  However, the recent hot weather is expected to reduce crop yields as significant rainfall has not been received in many areas for several weeks.  Rainfall is needed in most of the region to help the later-seeded crops mature.  The majority of the southwest received trace amounts of moisture this past week.  The Fife Lake and Webb areas received 2 mm of rain, the Bengough area 19 mm, the Glentworth area 6 mm, the Gravelbourg area 5 mm, the Mortlach area 8 mm, the Coderre area 18 mm, the Ponteix area 1 mm, the Stewart Valley area 17 mm, the Kyle area 4 mm and the Vanguard area 16 mm.  Most areas in crop districts 4A and 4B reported no rain for the week.   Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 186 mm (Lafleche area) to 438 mm (Cadillac area).    

Producers made progress with haying and now have 98 per cent of the hay crop cut. Ninety-three per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Ninety-four per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality, three per cent is rated as fair and three per cent is rated as poor.

Seven per cent of the region's crops are swathed or ready to straight combine. Fourteen per cent of the field peas, four per cent of the lentils, 18 per cent of the winter wheat and 21 per cent of the fall rye have been combined. Thirteen per cent of the canola and nine per cent of the mustard crops have been swathed, as well as 24 per cent of the fall rye and three percent of the oats.

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops , due to varying crop stages, disease and dry conditions in some areas.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 41 bu/ac; spring wheat 30 bu/ac; durum 30 bu/ac; oats 51 bu/ac; barley 49 bu/ac; fall rye 36 bu/ac; flax 23 bu/ac; canola 30 bu/ac; mustard 924 lb/ac; lentils 1366 lb/ac; peas 35 bu/ac; canaryseed 1147 lb/ac; and chickpeas 1298 lb/ac.

Field conditions are very dry in the region and a significant rain would be welcomed.  Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 44 per cent adequate, 43 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 40 per cent adequate, 34 per cent short and 26 per cent very short.  Seventy-seven per cent and 61 per cent of cropland acres in crop districts 4B and 3ASW, respectively, are short of moisture.  

Fifty per cent of crops are damaged by lack of moisture while hail, insects and disease have also contributed to crop damage this week.  Some areas on the east side of the region received a severe hailstorm that has damaged and lodged many crops.  Many fields are running out of water and there are concerns that many crops are not able to fill and mature properly.  Sclerotinia and bertha armyworms in canola crops have damaged many fields in the northern part of the region.    

Producers are busy finishing haying, desiccating crops and combining.

 


 

East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Most of the region received rain this week, slowing down field operations in some areas.  Crop conditions are improving and harvest will begin soon.  The Stockholm area reported 13 mm of rain, the Saltcoats area 10 mm, the Roblin area 6 mm, the Ituna area 16 mm, the Rama area 18 mm, the Sturgis area 3 mm, the Bethune area 25 mm, the Imperial area 18 mm, the Kenaston area 45 mm, the Leroy area 5 mm and the Humboldt area 33 mm.  Since April 1, cumulative rainfall in the region has ranged from 238 mm (Quill Lake area) to 490 mm (Goodeve area).

Haying has progressed and livestock producers now have 93 per cent of the hay crop cut and 81 per cent baled or put into silage.  Seventy-three per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality and 27 per cent is rated as fair.  The recent rain and humidity have increased quality concerns.  Some silage operations will begin this week.         

Harvest has begun in the region.  One per cent of the winter wheat is combined and 32 per cent is swathed or ready to straight cut.  Two per cent of the fall rye is combined and 69 per cent is swathed or ready to straight combined.  Two per cent of the field peas are ready to be straight combined.    

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops , due to varying crop stages, disease and excess moisture damage in some areas.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 46 bu/ac; spring wheat 35 bu/ac; durum 34 bu/ac; oats 73 bu/ac; barley 59 bu/ac; fall rye 27 bu/ac; flax 24 bu/ac; canola 30 bu/ac; mustard 1226 lb/ac; lentils 1005 lb/ac; peas 39 bu/ac; canaryseed 1114 lb/ac; and chickpeas 1200 lb/ac.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is reported as nine per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and six per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and nine per cent short.  Crop District 5A is reporting that 27 per cent of cropland acres have surplus moisture.   

Most crop damage is due to insects and disease.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia and bertha armyworms have caused the majority of damage to canola and yields are anticipated to be lower than normal.  Rust is also a concern in many cereal fields.

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales, swathing and desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

 

Rainfall varied throughout the region this week, from trace amounts to 73 mm in the Outlook area.  The Perdue area reported 2 mm of rainfall, the Rosthern area 16 mm, the Netherhill area 19 mm, the Rosetown area 6 mm, the Smiley area 4 mm, the Tramping Lake area 9 mm, the Battleford area 15 mm, the Biggar area 8 mm and the Macklin area 32 mm.  Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 271 mm in the Kindersley area to 518 mm in the Outlook area, which has received the third highest cumulative rainfall total in the province since April 1.   

Haying continues . Eighty-eight per cent of the hay crop has been cut and 74 per cent has been baled or put into silage.  Sixteen per cent of the hay is in excellent condition, 48 per cent is in good condition, 24 per cent is in fair condition and 12 per cent is in poor condition. Quality remains an issue due to a higher-than-normal number of rain showers.  Silage operations are underway.

Harvest is beginning in the region, although the majority of it will not begin for several weeks.  Eleven per cent of the winter wheat and five per cent of the fall rye is swathed or ready to straightcombine.  Crop conditions and crop staging greatly vary in the region, depending on the degree of springtime excess moisture and seeding date.      

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops, due to varying crop stages, flooded areas and disease.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 38 bu/ac; spring wheat 38 bu/ac; durum 38 bu/ac; oats 73 bu/ac; barley 57 bu/ac; fall rye 33 bu/ac; flax 24 bu/ac; canola 32 bu/ac; mustard 1240 lb/ac; sunflowers 1300 lb/ac; lentils 1331 lb/ac; peas 40 bu/ac; canaryseed 1112 lb/ac; and chickpeas 1400 lb/ac.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 15 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and five per cent short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as nine per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and six per cent short.

The majority of crop damage this week is due to aster yellows, sclerotinia and leaf spot diseases.  Producers are scouting for bertha armyworm and applying insecticides.  Hail damage was also reported in some areas.  Many areas could use some dry and warm weather to help crop development.       

Producers are busy finishing haying, controlling disease and insects and getting equipment ready for harvest.

 


 

Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Most areas of the region received a significant rainfall last Thursday and Friday that has damaged crops and delayed haying.  Many roads and fields are now flooded and field access is a concern.  The Nipawin area received 81 mm of rain, the Tisdale area 60 mm, the Arborfield area 36 mm, the Star City area 6 mm, the Humboldt area 23 mm, the Bruno area 14 mm, the Prince Albert area 55 mm, the Garrick area 62 mm and the Kinistino area 84 mm.  The Alvena area has recorded the least amount of rainfall since April 1 (339 mm) while the Tisdale area has received the greatest cumulative rainfall in both the region and the province (582 mm).      

Despite the rain, some haying progress was made, and 91 per cent of the hay crop has been cut. Eighty-one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage. Eighty-three per cent of the hay crop is good quality while 17 per cent is fair quality.  Silage operations have begun in some areas.

Harvest has begun in some parts of the region.  Seven per cent of the peas are combined while nine per cent are swathed or ready for straight combining.  Two per cent of the winter wheat and 38 per cent of the fall rye are swathed or ready for straight combining.

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops, due to varying crop stages, flooded areas and disease.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 40 bu/ac; spring wheat 38 bu/ac; durum 38 bu/ac; oats 78 bu/ac; barley 59 bu/ac; fall rye 45 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 29 bu/ac; lentils 1010 lb/ac; peas 32 bu/ac; and canaryseed 1031 lb/ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 37 per cent surplus and 63 per cent adequate.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 30 per cent surplus and 70 per cent adequate.  Crop District 9AE is reporting that 90 per cent of cropland and 50 per cent of hay land and pasture have surplus moisture.

The majority of reported crop damage is attributed to insects, disease, wind and flooding.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia, bertha armyworms and aphids are causing concerns in many areas of the region.  Producers would welcome warm weather to help dry up much of the area.  Some reporters, particularly in Crop District 9AE, have indicated that hay that could not be picked up before the rain is spoiling in the field.

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales and getting ready for harvest.

 


 

Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

The majority of the region received rainfall this past week in amounts varying from 4 mm to 45 mm.  The Speers area reported 8 mm, the Debden area 45 mm, the Medstead area 22 mm, the North Battleford area 12 mm, the Neilburg area 33 mm, the Frenchman Butte area 22 mm, the Rapid View area 24 mm and the Pierceland area 15 mm.  Cumulative rainfall since April 1varies from 207 mm (Rapid View area) to 414 mm (Radisson area). 

Some haying progress was made this week and producers now have 77 per cent of the hay crop cut.  Sixty per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage.  One hundred per cent of the hay crop is indicated to be in good condition.   

Two per cent of the peas have been swathed but the start of most harvest operations are at least a couple of weeks away.  Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops , due to varying crop stages, flooded areas and disease.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 60 bu/ac; spring wheat 42 bu/ac; oats 93 bu/ac; barley 71 bu/ac; fall rye 46 bu/ac; canola 35 bu/ac; lentils 600 lb/ac; and peas 40 bu/ac.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are six per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and five per cent short.  Pasture and hay land conditions are six per cent surplus, 86 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.

The majority of crop damage is due to disease, insects, wind and hail.  There are reports of significant aster yellows damage to canola in some areas.  Many canola producers are also spraying for bertha armyworms.  Timely rainfall is helping the crops fill in some areas and pasture conditions are improving.  Crops are behind their normal stages of development for this time of year and additional warm weather is needed to advance maturity.

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.


 

 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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