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       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago
Three per cent of the 2011 crop had been combined.  Thunderstorms brought heavy rain, strong winds and damaging hail in some areas.

Follow the 2012 Crop Report on Twitter @SKGovAg

Harvest Progress in SK
Per cent combined
All Crops

Aug 13/12

4

5 year avg.
(2007-2011)

3

Aug 18/11

3

Aug 16/10

1

Aug 18/09

3

Aug 17/08

3

Aug 12/07

7

Harvest is underway according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report. Four per cent of the 2012 crop has been combined while seven per cent is swathed or ready to straight combine. The five year (2007-2011) provincial average for this time of year is three per cent combined and six per cent swathed or ready to straight combine. 

Fifty-two per cent of the winter wheat, 47 per cent of the fall rye, two per cent of the barley, seven per cent of the mustard, 13 per cent of the lentils and 22 per cent of the field peas have been combined. Eleven per cent of the canola, 13 per cent of the mustard, six per cent of the lentils, four per cent of the winter wheat and 18 per cent of the fall rye have been swathed.

Livestock producers in many areas of the province finished haying this past week, although rainfall delayed progress in some areas. The average provincial hay yields on dry land are 1.5 tons per acre (alfalfa), 1.6 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome), 1.3 tons per acre (other tame hay and wild hay) and 1.9 tons per acre (greenfeed). On irrigated land, the average provincial hay yields are 2.1 tons per acre (alfalfa), 2.4 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome), 3.1 tons per acre (other tame hay) and 2.5 tons per acre (greenfeed).

Many areas of the province received rainfall this past week which has slowed harvest operations. The majority of crop damage is due to insects, disease, wind and hail.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as nine per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and two per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate, 23 per cent short and four per cent very short.

Farmers are busy swathing, combining and hauling hay.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Rain and high humidity throughout the region has delayed harvest operations.  Precipitation ranged from trace amounts to 22 mm for the week.  The Rocanville area recorded 22 mm, the Windthorst area 7 mm, the Manor area 8 mm, the Kisbey area 3 mm, the Weyburn area 10 mm, the Odessa area 18 mm, the Moose Jaw area 11 mm, the Marquis area 2 mm, the Radville area 9 mm and the Ceylon area 10 mm.  According to the Crop Report precipitation information, the Tantallon area has the second highest cumulative rainfall in the province since April 1 at 529 mm.  In contrast, the Weyburn area has the lowest cumulative rainfall in the province at 208 mm.

Harvest is progressing despite the recent rain showers.  Five per cent of the 2012 is harvested while 13 per cent is swathed or ready to straight combine.  Fifty-eight per cent of the winter wheat, 43 per cent of the fall rye, five per cent of the barley, four per cent of the lentils and 22 per cent of the peas have been combined.  Twenty-six per cent of the canola and 39 per cent of the mustard has been swathed.  Crop conditions and staging vary throughout the region, depending on the spring's excess moisture and seeding date.

Crop reporters have indicated that hay yields are variable across the region.  Estimated average hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa 1.4 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.6 tons per acre, other tame hay 1.5 tons per acre, wild hay 1.1 tons per acre and greenfeed 2.0 tons per acre. 

Topsoil moisture ratings on cropland are reported as eight per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate and 14 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short.  Crop District 2A is reporting that 33 per cent of cropland has surplus moisture.   

The majority of crop damage this week is due to disease, insects, wind, hail and localized flooding.  There are indications that sclerotinia, aster yellows and bertha armyworms will reduce canola yield in some parts of the region.  There have also been reports of grasshoppers in flax crops.  Peas and lentils may grade less than expected in some areas due to excess moisture.  Crops are quickly ripening and some will need additional moisture to help them mature.   

Producers are hauling bales, swathing crops, desiccating pulses and combining.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Thunderstorms brought hail, strong winds and much-needed rain to some areas of the region. Precipitation ranged from trace amounts in the majority of the region to 20 mm in the Lafleche area.  The Lisieux area recorded 5 mm of rain, the Limerick area 19 mm, the Gravelbourg area 4 mm, the Eyebrow and Maple Creek areas 2 mm, the Mankota area 15 mm, the Shaunavon area 8 mm, the Eastend area 1 mm and the Richmound area 3 mm.  Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 193 mm (Consul area) to 454 mm (Cadillac area).         

Thirteen per cent of the 2012 crop has been combined, up from seven per cent at this time last year.  An additional 14 per cent is swathed or ready to straight cut.  Sixty-two per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye, eight per cent of the barley, 27 per cent of the lentils, 56 per cent of the peas and 12 per cent of the mustard have been combined.  Forty-three per cent of the canola and 16 per cent of the mustard has been swathed. 

Hay yields vary in the region due to the high temperatures of July and August.  Estimated average hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa and other tame hay 1.2 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.3 tons per acre, wild hay 1.1 tons per acre and greenfeed 1.5 tons per acre; irrigated alfalfa 1.8 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 2.3 tons per acre, other tame hay 3.1 tons per acre and greenfeed 2.3 tons per acre.    

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 44 per cent adequate, 47 per cent short and nine per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 32 per cent adequate, 51 per cent short and 17 per cent very short.  In Crop District 4A, 68 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture.

The majority of crop damage is attributed to drought, hail, insects and disease.  Hail fell in some areas and has lodged many standing crops.  Additional rain is needed to help fill later-seeded crops.  Canola crops have been damaged by sclerotinia; and flea beetles are now causing issues in the swath.  Early yield estimates indicate that some areas are yielding less than expected due to the dry conditions.  There may also be seed quality issues in some areas.  Some producers may be done harvest in the next couple of weeks if the warm weather continues.  There have been reports of combine fires in the field due to the extreme lack of moisture in some areas.  

Producers are busy desiccating pulses, swathing and combining.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Most of the region received rain this week that has delayed harvest operations.  Crop conditions and staging vary throughout the region due to excess moisture and seeding date.  The Abernethy area received 10 mm of rain, the Ituna area 17 mm, the Roblin area 6 mm, the Raymore area 2 mm, the Kamsack and Jansen areas 5 mm, the Rama area 3 mm, the Chamberlain area 2 mm, the Bulyea area 3 mm, the Leroy area 12 mm and the Bradwell area 8 mm.  Since April 1, precipitation has ranged from 240 mm (Quill Lake area) to 490 mm (Goodeve area).

Harvest is now underway in the region, with one per cent of the 2012 crop combined and six per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.  Thirty-seven per cent of the winter wheat, 55 per cent of the fall rye and six per cent of the peas have been combined.  Twenty per cent of the winter wheat, 38 per cent of the fall rye, two per cent of the barley, 17 per cent of the peas and nine per cent of the lentils and canola is swathed or ready to straight combine.      

Hay yields vary in the region due to excess moisture and July's high temperatures.  Estimated hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa 1.7 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.8 tons per acre, other tame hay 1.6 tons per acre, wild hay 1.5 tons per acre and greenfeed 2.3 tons per acre; irrigated alfalfa, alfalfa/brome and greenfeed 2.0 tons per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 10 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and 17 per cent short.  Crop District 5A is reporting that 20 per cent of cropland and 19 per cent of hay land and pasture have surplus moisture.

Most crop damage is due to disease, insects, wind and heat stress.  Diseases such as sclerotinia, staghead, aster yellows and cereal leaf spot have damaged crops, and yields are anticipated to be lower than normal in many areas.  However, crops that were seeded later and did not receive excess moisture may yield better than expected.  Flea beetles, diamondback moths and armyworms are damaging crops and some crops continue to be sprayed with insecticides.

Producers are busy hauling bales, swathing, desiccating pulses and combining.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

The majority of the region received rain this past week, delaying harvest operations.  Precipitation varied from trace amounts to 30 mm in the Harris area.  The Hanley area received 1 mm of rain, the Langham area 16 mm, the Perdue area 15 mm, the Rosetown area 25 mm, the Kerrobert area 6 mm, the Luseland and Wilkie areas 2 mm and the Unity area 5 mm.  Since April 1, cumulative precipitation in the region has ranged from 292 mm (Kindersley area) to 519 mm (Outlook area).  The Outlook area has received the third highest cumulative rainfall total in the province since April 1.

Harvest is just beginning in some areas due to the excess moisture that delayed crop maturity.  Most areas have large variations in crop staging.  Less than one per cent of the 2012 crop is combined and just over one per cent is swathed or ready to straight combine.  Twelve per cent of the winter wheat and 11 per cent of the fall rye have been combined.  Ten per cent of the winter wheat, 55 per cent of the fall rye and three per cent of the canola have been swathed.  Most crop reporters are indicating that the majority of canola swathing will begin in the next week or two.

Hay yields vary in the region due to excess moisture and high July temperatures, although many areas had optimal conditions.  Estimated hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa 1.9 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.8 tons per acre, other tame hay 1.4 tons per acre, wild hay 1.6 tons per acre and greenfeed 2.2 tons per acre; irrigated alfalfa 2.8 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 3.5 tons per acre, other tame hay 3 tons per acre and greenfeed 3.5 tons per acre.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as eight per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and eight per cent short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as five per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short.

Insects and disease caused the majority of crop damage this week.  Chemical control of bertha armyworms continues in some areas.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia and cereal leaf spot diseases have damaged crops and there are indications that yield may be less than normal in some parts of the region.  Crops are maturing quickly and harvest will begin soon.  There have been reports of foot rot in cattle.        

Producers are busy swathing canola, desiccating pulses and getting ready to combine.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

The region received varying amounts of precipitation this past week that has delayed field operations.  The Tisdale area received 2 mm of rain, the Humboldt area 14 mm, the Melfort area 5 mm, the Kinistino area 8 mm and the Prince Albert area 20 mm.  The majority of Crop District 8A did not receive any precipitation this week.  The Alvena area has recorded the least amount of rainfall since April 1 (347 mm) while the Tisdale area has received the greatest cumulative rainfall in both the region and the province (584 mm).      

Harvest operations are just beginning in the majority of the region.  Less than one per cent of the 2012 crop has been combined.  Three per cent of the peas and 10 per cent of the winter wheat and fall rye has been combined.  One per cent of the canola has been swathed.

Hay yields vary in the region due to excess moisture and warm summer weather.  Estimated hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa 1.8 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.7 tons per acre, other tame hay 1.5 tons per acre, wild hay 1.4 tons per acre and greenfeed 1.0 ton per acre.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 34 per cent surplus and 66 per cent adequate.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 21 per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  Crop districts 8A and 9AE are reporting 44 and 43 per cent of cropland, respectively, have surplus moisture.  Forty per cent of hay land and pasture in CD 9AE has surplus moisture.

Disease and insects have damaged many crops in the region.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia, bertha armyworms and flea beetles are damaging canola and there are indications that yield may be less than expected.  Swathing should begin in the next week on fields that are dry enough to support equipment.  Many fields are wet and there are concerns that crop quality will be an issue. 

Producers are busy hauling bales, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Rainfall throughout the region varied from trace amounts to 26 mm in the Rapid View area.  The North Battleford region received 8 mm, the Rabbit Lake area 5 mm, the Medstead area 9 mm, the Neilburg area 14 mm, the Turtleford area 4 mm, the Frenchman Butte area 23 mm and the Pierceland area 9 mm.  Since April 1, rainfall in the region has varied from 233 mm (Rapid View area) to 429 mm (Radisson area). 

Harvest is just beginning in some parts of the region.  Less than one per cent of the 2012 crop is combined, swathed or ready for straight combining.  One per cent of the peas are combined while nine per cent are ready to straight combine.  One per cent of the canola has been swathed.

Haying is still underway but most producers should be finished in the coming days.   Estimated hay yields are as follows: dry land alfalfa and wild hay 1.5 tons per acre, alfalfa/brome 1.4 tons per acre, other tame hay 1.0 tons per acre and greenfeed 1.8 ton per acre.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are three per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and five per cent short.  Pasture and hay land conditions are one per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and ten per cent short.  Crop District 9B is reporting that 11 per cent of cropland and 16 per cent of hay land and pasture are short of moisture. 

The majority of crop damage is attributed to wind, insects and disease.  Producers in some areas continue to spray for bertha armyworms and lygus bugs.  Aster yellows and cereal leaf spot disease may affect the yield of some crops.  There have been reports of shortages of both insecticides and crop dusters due to high demand.  Crops are starting to turn and harvest will begin soon.  Many hay fields will have a second cut this year.  Additional rain is needed to help fill later-seeded crops. 

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.


 

Saskatchewan Harvest Progress August 13, 2012

Winter
wheat
% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 18 5 19 58
SW 17 1 20 62
EC 43 5 15 37
WC 57 10 21 12
NE 85 0 5 10
NW 100 0 0 0
 
Fall
rye
% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 24 20 13 43
SW* 10 12 4 62
EC 7 27 11 55
WC 21 55 13 11
NE 85 0 5 10
NW 100 0 0 0
* 12 per cent is rated as 'other'    
Barley % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE* 88 5 1 5
SW** 74 1 16 8
EC 98 1 1 0
WC 100 0 0 0
NE 98 2 0 0
NW 100 0 0 0
* one per cent is rated as 'other'    
** one per cent is rated as 'other'    
Lentils % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 81 10 5 4
SW 44 8 21 27
EC 91 1 8 0
WC 98 1 1 0
NE 100 0 0 0
NW 100 0 0 0
Peas % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 67 2 9 22
SW 24 0 20 56
EC 77 3 14 6
WC 99 0 1 0
NE 95 1 1 3
NW 90 0 9 1
Canola % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 71 26 1 2
SW 52 43 0 5
EC 91 9 0 0
WC 97 3 0 0
NE 99 1 0 0
NW 99 1 0 0
Mustard % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 60 39 0 1
SW 64 16 8 12
EC 100 0 0 0
WC 100 0 0 0
NE 100 0 0 0
NW 100 0 0 0
 
Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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