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      Friday, December 15, 2017

One year ago
Nine per cent of the 2011 crop had been combined and 18 per cent was swathed or ready to straight combine.  Warm and dry weather helped to progress harvest.

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Harvest Progress in SK
Per cent combined
All Crops

Aug 23/12

11

5 year avg.
(2007-2011)

8

Aug 25/11

9

Aug 23/10

2

Aug 25/09

3

Aug 24/08

9

Aug 19/07

16

Warm and dry weather in many areas of the province has allowed producers to combine 11 per cent of the 2012 crop.  Eighteen per cent is swathed or ready to straight combine, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. 

The five-year (2007-2011) average for this time of year is eight per cent combined and 15 per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.  Last year at this time, nine per cent had been combined and 18 per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.

Seventy-nine per cent of the winter wheat, 78 per cent of the fall rye, four per cent of the spring wheat, seven per cent of the durum, six per cent of the barley, five per cent of the canola, 22 per cent of the mustard, 36 per cent of the lentils and 41 per cent of the field peas have been combined.  Thirty-two per cent of the canola, 26 per cent of the mustard, 15 per cent of the winter wheat, 12 per cent of the fall rye, 20 per cent of the lentils and 21 per cent of the field peas are swathed or ready to straight combine. 

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate, 19 per cent short and four per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and nine per cent very short.

Farmers are busy swathing, desiccating and combining and hauling bales.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Warm and dry weather this past week is moving harvest along.  The region received very little precipitation; at 4 mm, the Moose Jaw area received the greatest amount of rain.  The Odessa and Indian Head areas received 2 mm and the Wilcox area 3 mm.  According to Crop Report precipitation information, the Tantallon area has the second highest cumulative rainfall in the province since April 1 (531 mm).  In contrast, the Radville area has the lowest cumulative rainfall in the province (190 mm).

Harvest is quickly progressing and producers now have 20 per cent of the 2012 crop harvested, up from five per cent last week.  Twenty-six per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight combine.  Eighty-three per cent of the winter wheat, 78 per cent of the fall rye, 12 per cent of the spring wheat, 13 per cent of the durum, 10 per cent of the barley, 40 per cent of the lentils, 54 per cent of the field peas, five per cent of the chickpeas, 14 per cent of the canola and two per cent of the mustard have been combined.  Fifty per cent of the canola and 46 per cent of the mustard has been swathed.  Crop conditions and staging vary throughout the region, depending on the excess moisture in the spring, seeding date and the impact from disease. 

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops due to the variable crop staging, disease and heat stress damage.  Most crop yield estimates have decreased in the past few weeks.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 54 bu/ac, spring wheat 35 bu/ac, durum 36 bu/ac, oats 64 bu/ac, barley 54 bu/ac, fall rye 47 bu/ac, flax 21 bu/ac, canola 28 bu/ac, mustard 840 lb./ac, sunflowers 1650 lb./ac, lentils 1250 lb./ac, peas 32 bu/ac, canaryseed 1014 lb./ac and chickpeas 2066 lb./ac.  

Topsoil moisture ratings on cropland are reported as two per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 18 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and 23 per cent short.  Crop District 3ASE is reporting that 35 per cent of cropland and 47 per cent of hay land and pasture are short moisture. 

The majority of crop damage this week is due to wind, localized flooding, animals, insects and disease.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia, fusarium, lodging and July's high temperatures will affect yields.  Many producers in the region are indicating that yields on harvested crops are less than had been anticipated.  There have been reports of grasshoppers in standing flax fields and wildlife feeding on crops.  Some swathed pea crops are sprouting and producers are reporting that some pulse crops are coming off tough.  At this time, four per cent of forage crops have not been cut or baled due to excess moisture or drought. 

Producers are desiccating pulses, cleaning corrals and swathing and combining crops.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

The region received very little precipitation this past week, helping to progress harvest.  The Stewart Valley and Consul areas received 8 mm of rainfall, the Mankota and Kincaid areas 5 mm, the Tyner and Frontier areas 4 mm, the Admiral area 3 mm, the Ponteix and Eyebrow areas 2 mm and the Glenbain area 1 mm.  Since April 1, rainfall in the region has ranged from 197 mm (Assiniboia area) to 454 mm (Cadillac area).

Twenty-seven per cent of the 2012 has now been harvested, up from 13 per cent last week.  An additional 18 per cent is swathed or ready to straight cut.  Seventy-seven per cent of the winter wheat, 81 per cent of the fall rye, nine per cent of the spring wheat, five per cent of the durum, 26 per cent of the barley, 60 per cent of the lentils, 75 per cent of the peas, two per cent of the chickpeas, 25 per cent of the canola and 36 per cent of the mustard have been combined.  Forty-four per cent of the canola, 37 per cent of the mustard, 29 per cent of the barley, 17 per cent of the spring wheat and 12 per cent of the durum is swathed or ready to straight cut. 

Average yields vary across the region depending on excess moisture in the spring, the high temperatures of July and August, and disease and insect damage.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 45 bu/ac, spring wheat 31 bu/ac, durum 34 bu/ac, oats 49 bu/ac, barley 48 bu/ac, fall rye 38 bu/ac, flax 17 bu/ac, canola 27 bu/ac, mustard 960 lb./ac, lentils 1408 lb./ac, peas 32 bu/ac, canaryseed 1080 lb./ac and chickpeas 1278 lb./ac.

Moisture conditions in the region continue to worsen due to the high temperatures and lack of moisture over the past month.  Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 34 per cent adequate, 49 per cent short and 17 per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are 23 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and 32 per cent very short.  In Crop District 4A, 84 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture.  This has increased from 68 per cent last week.  Rainfall is needed in the majority of the region to help recharge the soil. 

Much of the crop damage this past week is attributed to drought.  The remaining damage is attributed to wind, insects and disease.  There have been many reports of grasshoppers damaging crops and large flea beetle populations in canola.  Many crops have been damaged by disease and drought and many areas are reporting disappointing yields.  However, some areas that received timely rainfalls are reporting slightly-above-average yields.  Strong winds last week shelled some canola and lentils fields and many swaths have been blown around.  A light frost was received in some areas last Wednesday night but damage to crops has been minimal.  Many crops that were harvested during high temperatures are now being aerated.  At this time, two per cent of forage crops have not been cut or baled due to excess moisture or drought.        

Producers are busy swathing and combining crops, hauling bales and preparing bins.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Small amounts of rain this past week have delayed field operations in some areas of the region.  Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 26 mm in the Kelvington area.  The Langenburg area received 14 mm of rain, the Dysart area 3 mm, the Ituna and Leroy areas 12 mm, the Rama and Kuroki areas 6 mm, the Wynyard area 2 mm, the Semans area 9 mm, the Allan and Bethune areas 1 mm and the Meacham area 4 mm.  Since April 1, cumulative rainfall in the region has ranged from 244 mm (Quill Lake area) to 493 mm (Jedburgh area).

Harvest continues in the region, with four per cent of the 2012 crop combined and an additional 20 per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.  Last week, only one per cent of the crop was combined and six per cent swathed or ready to straight combine.  Seventy-seven per cent of the winter wheat, 89 per cent of the fall rye, one per cent of the spring wheat, five per cent of the durum, three per cent of the barley, 15 per cent of the lentils, 38 per cent of the peas, five per cent of the chickpeas and one per cent of the canola have been combined.  Thirty-three per cent of the canola and six per cent of the mustard has been swathed.

Yields vary throughout the region and many crops are yielding less than what had been expected due to excess moisture, disease and high temperatures during flowering.  Estimated yields of some uncombined crops have decreased in the past few weeks.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 43 bu/ac, spring wheat 34 bu/ac, durum 34 bu/ac, oats 74 bu/ac, barley 55 bu/ac, fall rye 38 bu/ac, flax 22 bu/ac, canola 27 bu/ac, mustard 1146 lb./ac, lentils 1417 lb./ac, peas 33 bu/ac, canaryseed 772 lb./ac and chickpeas 1200 lb./ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 74 per cent adequate and 20 per cent short.  Crop District 5A is reporting that 18 per cent of cropland and 16 per cent of hay land and pasture have surplus moisture.

Crop damage this week is attributed to disease, insects, hail and drought.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia and bertha armyworms will affect canola yields in much of the region.  Cereal yields will be less than expected due to lodging, aster yellows and sawfly damage.  There have been many reports of shrunken kernels and ergot, and there are indications that quality may be an issue this year.  Weed populations have increased in fields that had excess moisture and where crops have been drowned out.  A light frost was received last Wednesday morning in some areas but damage is minimal.  At this time, five per cent of forage crops will not be cut or baled due to excess moisture or drought; however, a second cut will be possible on some hay fields that did not receive excess moisture.

Producers are busy hauling bales, swathing and combining.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Varying amounts of rainfall were received in the region, delaying some field operations.  The Battleford area received 20 mm, the Rosthern area 14 mm, the Arelee area 4 mm, the Conquest area 2 mm, the Rosetown area 6 mm, the Kindersley area 3 mm, the Kerrobert area 10 mm, the Landis area 8 mm and the Macklin area 17 mm.  Since April 1, cumulative precipitation in the region has ranged from 310 mm (Netherhill area) to 523 mm (Outlook area).  The Outlook area has the third highest cumulative rainfall total in the province since April 1.

Harvest is progressing and producers now have two per cent of the 2012 crop combined, up from less than one per cent last week.  Fifteen per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight combine.  Forty-three per cent of the winter wheat, 71 per cent of the fall rye and nine per cent of the peas have been combined.  One per cent of the spring wheat, barley, lentils, canola and mustard have been combined.  Twenty-eight per cent of the canola and seven per cent of the mustard is swathed.  Warm and dry weather is needed to advance the maturity of many later-seeded crops.   

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops, due to variable crop staging, flooded areas and disease.  Many combined pea crops had disappointing yields due to disease and excess moisture.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 41 bu/ac, spring wheat 36 bu/ac, durum 38 bu/ac, oats 68 bu/ac, barley 56 bu/ac, fall rye 30 bu/ac, flax 22 bu/ac, canola 30 bu/ac, mustard 1235 lb./ac, sunflowers 1150 lb./ac, lentils 1174 lb./ac, peas 35 bu/ac, canaryseed 882 lb./ac and chickpeas 1000 lb./ac. 

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as five per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and 11 per cent short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as four per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate and 19 per cent short. 

Insects and disease caused the majority of crop damage this week.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia and bertha armyworms are expected to reduce canola yields in much of the region.  Pulse and cereal crops that have lodged are causing harvest issues.  There have been reports of wildlife damage to many crops and some producers are still spraying for bertha armyworms in later-seeded canola.  Crops are advancing quickly and additional warm weather is needed to facilitate harvest operations.  At this time, two per cent of forage crops will not be cut or baled due to excess moisture.     

Producers are busy swathing canola, desiccating pulses, cleaning bins and getting ready to combine.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

The region continues to receive significant amounts of rain that is delaying field operations.  The Porcupine Plain area received 45 mm of rain this past week, the Arborfield and Alvena areas 13 mm, the Codette area 26 mm, the Nipawin area 31 mm, the Garrick area 30 mm, the Prince Albert area 22 mm, the Bruno area 14 mm, the Melfort area 36 mm and the Birch Hills area 24 mm.  The Alvena area has recorded the least amount of rainfall since April 1 (360 mm), while the Tisdale area has received the greatest cumulative rainfall in both the region and the province (605 mm).      

Just over one per cent of the 2012 crop has been combined and 11 per cent is swathed or ready to straight combine.  Forty-nine per cent of the winter wheat, 81 per cent of the fall rye, two per cent of the barley, one per cent of the lentils and 15 per cent of the peas have been combined.  An additional 26 per cent of the peas and 28 per cent of the canola is swathed or ready to straight combine.   

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops, due to variable crop staging, flooded areas and disease.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 40 bu/ac, spring wheat 38 bu/ac, durum 38 bu/ac, oats 81 bu/ac, barley 61 bu/ac, fall rye 43 bu/ac, flax 21 bu/ac, canola 30 bu/ac, mustard 900 lb./ac, lentils 1398 lb./ac, peas 33 bu/ac, canaryseed 1113 lb./ac and chickpeas 1200 lb./ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 24 per cent surplus and 76 per cent adequate.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 12 per cent surplus and 88 per cent adequate.  Crop districts 8A and 9AE are reporting 25 per cent of cropland has surplus moisture.  Eighteen per cent of hay land and pasture in CD 8B has surplus moisture.

Insects, disease and localized flooding are causing most of the crop damage this week.  Many fields in the region have flooded areas and cannot support equipment.  Water that lies in some fields and across access roads will cause harvest challenges if warm and dry weather does not arrive soon.  Spraying for bertha armyworms and diamondback moths continues in some parts of the region.  Aster yellows, sclerotinia and insects will cause yield loss in many canola yields.  Crops are ripening quickly and the bulk of harvest is expected to begin soon if the fields dry up.  At this time, 11 per cent of forage crops will not be cut or baled due to excess moisture; however, many producers will be getting a second cut of hay. 

Producers are busy hauling bales, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Much of the region received rainfall this past week that has delayed field operations.  The Hafford area received 10 mm of rain, the Speers area 14 mm, the Duck Lake area 18 mm, the North Battleford area 20 mm, the Glaslyn area 17 mm, the Turtleford area 5 mm, the Frenchman Butte area 4 mm and the Dorintosh area 3 mm.  Since April 1, rainfall in the region has varied from 236 mm (Dorintosh area) to 437 mm (Radisson area).    

Harvest is just beginning in some parts of the region.  Just over one per cent of the 2012 crop is combined and 11 per cent is swathed or ready for straight combining.  Twelve per cent of the peas have been combined and an additional 26 per cent is swathed or ready to straight cut.  Ninety-nine per cent of the winter wheat, 85 per cent of the fall rye and six per cent of the spring wheat is swathed or ready to straight cut.  Most harvest operations will begin in the coming weeks.     

Many crop reporters are indicating that it is difficult to assess yields at this time on uncombined crops, due to variable crop staging, flooded areas, insects and disease.  Average yields for the region are predicted as follows: winter wheat 60 bu/ac, spring wheat 41 bu/ac, oats 91 bu/ac, barley 70 bu/ac, fall rye 39 bu/ac, canola 33 bu/ac, lentils 600 lb./ac and peas 36 bu/ac.

Topsoil moisture conditions for cropland are three per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and four per cent short.  Pasture and hay land conditions are one per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and ten per cent short. 

The majority of crop damage is attributed to wind, insects and disease.  Spraying continues for bertha armyworms and lygus bugs in some areas of the region.  Some producers have noticed wheat midge larvae in wheat heads but damage appears minimal at this time.  There have been reports of wildlife and disease damage on many pea fields.  Aster yellows have damaged most canola crops and yield loss will be significant in many areas of the region.  Many crop yields will be less than anticipated due to disease, insects and heat stress.  At this time, one per cent of forage crops will not be cut or baled due to drought.          

Producers are busy finishing haying, hauling bales, desiccating pulses and getting ready for harvest.


 

Winter
Wheat
% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 4 4 9 83
SW* 10 1 11 77
EC 0 5 18 77
WC 11 6 40 43
NE 48 0 3 49
NW 1 0 99 0
* one per cent is rated as 'other'
 
Fall Rye % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 7 5 10 78
SW* 1 1 0 81
EC 0 7 4 89
WC 0 12 17 71
NE** 0 10 7 81
NW 15 3 82 0
* 17 per cent is rated as 'other'
** two per cent is rated as 'other'
Spring
Wheat
% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 74 6 8 12
SW 74 3 14 9
EC 91 4 4 1
WC 96 2 1 1
NE 96 1 3 0
NW 94 3 3 0
Durum % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 76 5 6 13
SW 83 3 9 5
EC 98 1 0 1
WC 97 2 1 0
NE 100 0 0 0
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A
Barley % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 72 12 6 10
SW 45 5 24 26
EC 83 8 6 3
WC 92 5 2 1
NE 84 6 8 2
NW 98 2 0 0
Lentils % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 37 13 10 40
SW 20 6 14 60
EC 60 2 23 15
WC 83 5 11 1
NE 82 7 10 1
NW 100 0 0 0
Peas % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 30 2 14 54
SW* 14 0 10 75
EC 36 7 19 38
WC 60 3 28 9
NE 59 11 15 15
NW 62 5 21 12
Chickpeas % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 29 66 0 5
SW 94 0 4 2
EC 60 12 23 5
WC 83 0 17 0
NE N/A N/A N/A N/A
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A
Canola % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 34 50 2 14
SW 31 42 2 25
EC 66 33 0 1
WC 71 28 0 1
NE 84 16 0 0
NW 82 18 0 0
Mustard % Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 52 46 0 2
SW 27 15 22 36
EC 92 6 2 0
WC 91 7 1 1
NE 100 0 0 0
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units



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