Government of Saskatchewan
Quick Search:
       Monday, October 23, 2017

One year ago
Ninety-nine per cent of the 2011 crop had been harvested, following several weeks of warm and dry weather.  Crop yields and quality were generally good.

Follow the 2012 Crop Report on Twitter@SKGovAg

Saskatchewan Harvest
October 15, 2012
%  combined 

Winter wheat

100

Fall rye*

100

Spring wheat

100

Durum

100

Barley

100

Oats

98

Canaryseed

97

Flax

95

Canola

99

Mustard

99

Lentils

100

Peas

100

Chickpeas

99

*includes eight per cent ‘other'

Harvest Progress in SK
Per cent combined
All Crops

Oct 18/12

99

5 year avg.
(2007-2011)

94

Oct 20/11

99

Oct 18/10

97

Oct 19/09

77

Oct 18/08

99

Oct 14/07

96

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop has been harvested, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. The five-year (2007-2011) provincial average for this time of year is 94 per cent combined.  Warm and dry harvest weather allowed Saskatchewan producers to get the 2012 crop in the bin in mostly good condition.   

The northwestern region has 98 per cent of the crop combined and all other regions are reporting that 99 per cent of the crop is in the bin.  Ninety-five per cent of the flax has been combined. 

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as two per cent surplus, 31 per cent adequate, 43 per cent short and 24 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 31 per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and 29 per cent very short. 

The number of acres in the province seeded to winter wheat and fall rye has decreased by 46 and 36 per cent, respectively, relative to 2011.  This is mainly due to dry soil and seed germination concerns.  Cattle producers have more-than-adequate winter hay supplies.

In general, crop yields are reported to be average.  Crop quality and grade are generally good for much of the province.  Seventy-seven per cent of the spring wheat and durum, 78 per cent of the lentils, 89 per cent of the peas and 95 per cent of the canola are expected to fall within the top two grades.

 Saskatchewan Agriculture has a group of 230 volunteer crop reporters from across the province. Thank you for your valued dedication to the crop report. In 2012, there are three crop reporters reaching their 20 year milestone; one reaching 25 years; four reaching 30 years and three reaching 35 years of crop reporting.
Congratulations!!


2012 Overview (Conditions as report on Oct. 18)

Hot and dry weather in fall allowed producers to harvest the 2012 crop in mostly good condition. Despite the spring's excess moisture problems in much of the province, the majority of producers were able to seed and harvest a crop this year. For many in the southeast, it was the first time in several years that a crop was seeded. Yields were mostly average, with many producers reporting much lower yields than had been expected. Excess moisture, heat stress, wind, hail, disease and insects all took a toll on the 2012 crop.

Last winter was fairly mild and there was not enough snow runoff in many parts of the province to provide sufficient moisture at seeding time. Parts of the west-central and southwestern regions had poor stubble subsoil moisture going into winter and there were concerns of drought-like conditions in the spring. Large amounts of precipitation fell in the months of April and May, helping to alleviate some of these concerns in the west. In the east, however, excess moisture hindered seeding.

Despite the excess moisture, producers in many areas were able to start seeding around the end of April, and, by the first week of May, had five per cent of the crop seeded. Field conditions were better than they had been for several years in many parts of the province, and seeding quickly progressed once the rain stopped. By June 18, 98 per cent of the crop had been seeded, compared to just 82 per cent at the same time in 2011.

It was a difficult year for many crops, as flooding, heat stress, diseases, insects, wind and hail affected the whole province. The eastern side dealt with excess moisture for the majority of the year while the south dealt with high temperatures and heat stress. By mid-July, hail insurance claims were twice the average and the number continued to rise throughout the growing season.

Diseases were present in the majority of crops this year, although canola was affected the most. Aster yellows and sclerotinia were present in almost every canola field and yields were significantly lower than expected for many producers. Many cereal crops had higher-than-normal levels of leaf disease, root rot and fusarium. For the most part, insect damage was minimal in many areas, although there were pockets of the province that had more damage from wheat midge, diamondback moths and grasshoppers. Bertha armyworm numbers were high in many areas of the province, particularly on the western side. There were many reports of crop dusters working overtime to get fields sprayed before damage worsened.

Heavy rains continuously fell in some parts of the province during the summer and caused many fields and access roads to flood. The province received a lot of rain during early-to-mid June and again in mid-July. Many areas reported over two inches of rain each time and some areas reported four inches or more. The Tisdale region received 112 mm in a matter of hours on July 18, flattening many crops in the area. Producers in some northern regions reported that many fields and roads could not support equipment and there were many ruts left in fields that will need to be worked this fall.

According to the Crop Report records, the Tisdale area received the largest amount of cumulative rainfall in the province since April 1 -- 636 mm. The Nipawin area came in second at 579 mm and the Battleford area third with 556 mm. The least amount of cumulative rainfall for the province was recorded around the Gainsborough area (181 mm). The Bengough area recorded 187 mm, while the Radville area recorded 193 mm. Snow has fallen in the last few weeks in most of the province but has not stayed.

For most producers in the province, and especially in the southwest, high summer temperatures and dry soil stressed the crops during flowering. Producers reported flower blasting of canola, stunted plants and thin stands. Crop and hay yields were lower than expected due to the drought-like conditions. The southwest was the driest region in the province throughout the growing season and drought conditions are still apparent in much of the area. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland and hay and pasture at the end of June were 87 per cent and 90 per cent adequate, respectively, but conditions had worsened considerably by the end of September. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland and hay and pasture were now rated as 60 per cent and 67 per cent very short, respectively.

The provincial hay crop yielded well and quality was generally good; however, the high temperatures and an alfalfa weevil outbreak in some areas affected the quantity and quality of the hay. The provincial average yield on dryland brome/alfalfa hay was 1.61 tons/acre (range 1.37 tons/acre to 1.99 tons/acre). Winter feed supplies are adequate going into winter.

The warm temperatures and dry field conditions in August allowed producers to begin harvest earlier than normal. By the beginning of September, 56 per cent of the provincial crop had been harvested, well above the five-year (2007-2011) provincial average of 40 per cent for that time of year. Very little rainfall was received in September and, by the first week of October, 99 per cent of the 2012 crop was in the bin. Although the rain held off for the majority of harvest, the province received strong winds for many days in early September that blew swaths across fields and shelled standing crops. The damage was worse in northern areas where the majority of the canola crop had not yet been combined. Volunteer canola will be an issue in these areas in the coming year. The first significant fall frost was received in mid-September for most of the province. Damage was minimal for the most part but some later-seeded crops such as flax and wheat received some damage.

Crop yields were also less than anticipated for much of the province due to disease, insects and heat stress damage, although some winter wheat and later-seeded crops yielded better than expected for most producers. For some producers in the south, the winter wheat was the best crop they had ever grown. Any earlier-seeded crops such as pulses and some cereals did not yield as well due to excess moisture, heat stress at flowering and disease. Although fields were combined in record time this fall, many producers did not seed a winter wheat or fall rye crop due to lack of moisture. As there were germination and establishment concerns in much of the province, seeded winter cereal acres are significantly lower than normal

Some barley crops came off light and many pulse crops had more disease than normal. Canola crops that appeared promising prior to harvest had disappointing and lower-than-expected yields. Fusarium, ergot and wheat midge damaged many wheat crops and quality for 2013 may be an issue.

Crop quality and yields are estimated to be near the 10-year average. Downgrading at the elevator is due to hail, frost, heat stress, ergot, fusarium and wheat midge. The spring wheat crop is estimated to be 36 per cent 1 CW, 41 per cent 2 CW, 16 per cent 3 CW and seven per cent Feed. The durum crop is expected to be 43 per cent 1 CW, 33 per cent 2 CW, 18 per cent 3CW and six per cent Other. Twenty-one per cent of the oat crop is expected to grade 1 CW, 53 per cent 2 CW, 21 per cent 3CW and five per cent Feed. Twenty-three per cent of the barley crop is estimated to be malt quality, 51 per cent will grade 1 CW and 26 per cent will grade 2 CW. The fall rye crop will grade 51 per cent 1 CW, 42 per cent 2 CW and seven per cent 3 CW.

Eighty-six per cent of the flax is anticipated to grade 1 CW, 13 per cent 2 CW and one per cent 3 CW. The mustard crop is expected to grade 81 per cent 1 CAN, 14 per cent 2 CAN, four per cent 3 CAN and one per cent Other. Seventy-nine per cent of the canola is expected to grade 1 CAN, 16 per cent 2 CAN, four per cent 3 CAN and one per cent Sample.

Twenty-five per cent of the lentil crop is projected to grade 1 CAN, 54 per cent 2 CAN, 20 per cent 3 CAN and one per cent Other. Twenty-seven per cent of the peas are expected to grade 1 CAN, 62 per cent 2 CAN, 10 per cent 3 CAN and one per cent Other. The chickpea crop is expected to grade 48 per cent 1 CW, 46 per cent 2 CW and six per cent 3 CW.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Almost all crops are harvested in the area with the exception of three per cent of the flax and the odd oat field. Crop yields are quite variable across the region, depending on excess moisture received in the spring, heat stress during the summer months and disease impact.

Many winter cereals and later-seeded crops yielded better than the earlier-seeded crops. Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 51 bu/ac; spring wheat 33 bu/ac; durum 36 bu/ac; oats 58 bu/ac; barley 47 bu/ac; fall rye 48 bu/ac; flax 21 bu/ac; canola 25 bu/ac; mustard 738 lb./ac; sunflowers 1,500 lb./ac; lentils 1,209 lb./ac; peas 30 bu/ac; chickpeas 1,682 lb./ac and canaryseed 968 lb./ac.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 21 per cent adequate, 58 per cent short and 21 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 18 per cent adequate, 53 per cent short and 29 per cent very short. Crop District 3ASE is reporting 47 per cent of cropland acres to be very short topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated decreases of 52 and 45 per cent, respectively, in winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. This is largely due to a lack of soil moisture this fall and concerns that the crop would not germinate or establish in time for winter. The ground was also fairly difficult to seed into this fall as soil compaction was an issue.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.51; alfalfa/brome 1.52; other tame hay 1.48; wild hay 1.18 and greenfeed 1.92. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay (99 per cent), straw (95 per cent), greenfeed (99 per cent) and feed grain (94 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

Although the year started out very wet, field conditions are very dry in most of the region. Many areas have not received a significant rainfall since early July. According to the Crop Report records, the Tantallon area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 540  mm. The Rocanville area came in second at 491 mm, and the third highest was the Indian Head area with 450 mm. The Gainsborough area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 181 mm.

Producers are busy bringing cattle home from pastures, hauling bales, working fields and putting machinery away. Most producers are hoping for a significant rain this fall to help recharge the soil before winter.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4)

Thirteen per cent of the canaryseed and nine per cent of the flax have yet to be combined. Crop yields are quite variable across the region, depending on spring excess moisture in some areas, disease and heat stress

Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 43 bu/ac; spring wheat 32 bu/ac; durum 35 bu/ac; oats 51 bu/ac; barley 49 bu/ac; fall rye 33 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 24 bu/ac; mustard 902 lb./ac; lentils 1,477 lb./ac; peas 30 bu/ac; chickpeas 1,457 lb./ac and canaryseed 1,120 lb./ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as seven per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and 54 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and 63 per cent very short. Crop districts 3BS and 4A are reporting 66 and 67 per cent of cropland acres, respectively, to be very short topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated decreases of 58 and 37 per cent, respectively, in winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. This is largely due to a lack of soil moisture this fall and concerns that the crop would not germinate or establish in time for winter. The ground was also fairly difficult to seed into this fall as soil compaction was an issue. Some RMs that normally seed a large number of acres have not seeded any this fall.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.28; alfalfa/brome 1.37; other tame hay 1.23; wild hay 1.03 and greenfeed 1.62. Average irrigated hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and other tame hay 2.00; alfalfa/brome 2.75 and greenfeed 2.25. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay (100 per cent), straw and greenfeed (94 per cent) and feed grain (93 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

The soil moisture conditions in the region have worsened since summer. The majority of the region has not received a significant rainfall since early July. According to the Crop Report records, the Cadillac area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 469 mm. The Lucky Lake area came in second at 407 mm, and the third highest was the Eyebrow area with 384 mm. The Bengough area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 187 mm.

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, cleaning up yards and corrals, working fields and putting equipment away. Most producers are hoping for a significant rain this fall to help recharge the soil before winter.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

There are still a few fields of canola, canaryseed and flax left to combine in the region. Crop yields are quite variable, depending on excess moisture in the spring, disease impact and heat stress. Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 42 bu/ac; spring wheat 32 bu/ac; durum 35 bu/ac; oats 62 bu/ac; barley 47 bu/ac; fall rye 37 bu/ac; flax 22 bu/ac; canola 23 bu/ac; mustard 1,079 lb./ac; lentils 1,440 lb./ac; peas 32 bu/ac; chickpeas 1,500 lb./ac and canaryseed 934 lb./ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as 28 per cent adequate, 47 per cent short and 25 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 31 per cent adequate, 43 per cent short and 26 per cent very short. Crop District 6A is reporting 34 per cent of cropland acres are very short topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated decreases of 19 and two per cent, respectively, in winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. This is largely due to a lack of soil moisture this fall and concerns that the crop would not germinate or establish in time for winter. Some RMs that normally seed large amounts of winter cereals did not seed any this fall.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.68; alfalfa/brome 1.86; other tame hay 1.53; wild hay 1.37 and greenfeed 2.62. Average irrigated hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and alfalfa/brome 2.07 and greenfeed 2.00. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay (98 per cent), straw (99 per cent), greenfeed (100 per cent) and feed grain (95 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

According to the Crop Report records, the Jedburgh area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 499 mm. The Kamsack area came in second at 474 mm, and the third highest was the Goodeve area with 467 mm. The Stenen area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 259 mm.

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, cleaning up yards and corrals, monitoring bins, working fields and putting equipment away. Most producers are hoping for a significant rain this fall to help recharge the soil before winter.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Ten per cent of chickpeas, four per cent of canaryseed, 14 per cent of flax and five per cent of the mustard still need to be combined. Crop yields are variable across the region. Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 34 bu/ac; spring wheat 31 bu/ac; durum 32 bu/ac; oats 62 bu/ac; barley 47 bu/ac; fall rye 29 bu/ac; flax 20 bu/ac; canola 25 bu/ac; mustard 985 lb./ac; sunflowers 1,100 lb./ac; lentils 1,570 lb./ac; peas 28 bu/ac and canaryseed 1,125 lb./ac.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 28 per cent adequate, 57 per cent short and 15 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 33 per cent adequate, 50 per cent short and 17 per cent very short.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated decreases of 21 and 28 per cent, respectively, in winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. This is mainly due to dry soil concerns and compacted soils.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.99; alfalfa/brome 1.91; other tame hay 1.39; wild hay 1.58 and greenfeed 1.87. Average irrigated hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 3.17; alfalfa/brome 3.86; other tame hay 3.31; wild hay 1.71 and greenfeed 3.86. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay, straw and feed grain (100 per cent), and greenfeed (99 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

According to the Crop Report records, the Wilkie area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 556 mm. The Outlook area came in second at 550 mm, and the third highest was the Sonningdale area with 549 mm. The Kindersley area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 238 mm.

Producers are busy finishing up harvest, cleaning corrals, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales and grain, monitoring bins and putting equipment away. A significant rain would be welcomed by most producers before winter.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Fifteen per cent of the flax and a few oat and canola fields remain to be harvested.  Crop yields are variable across the region depending on excess moisture and disease. Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 26 bu/ac; spring wheat 35 bu/ac; durum 34 bu/ac; oats 73 bu/ac; barley 42 bu/ac; fall rye 43 bu/ac; flax 20 bu/ac; canola 23 bu/ac; mustard 900 lb./ac; lentils 975 lb./ac; peas 26 bu/ac and canaryseed 892 lb./ac.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 21 per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate, eight per cent short and two per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Crop District 8A is reporting 25 per cent of cropland acres to have surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated an increase of three per cent in winter wheat acres and a decrease of nine per cent in fall rye acres. Moisture conditions in most fields were suitable for seeding this fall.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.06; alfalfa/brome 1.99; other tame hay 1.57; wild hay 1.54 and greenfeed 2.16. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay, straw and greenfeed (100 per cent), and feed grain (99 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

The region has received large amounts of rain since July. According to the Crop Report records, the Tisdale area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 636 mm. The Nipawin area came in second at 579 mm, and the third highest was the Bruno area with 548 mm. The Alvena area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 408 mm.

Producers are busy finishing up harvest, cleaning corrals and yards, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales and grain, monitoring bins and putting equipment away. Most producers are hoping for a drier winter to help alleviate the surplus moisture conditions in fields.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Ninety-eight per cent of the crop has been combined in the region. Five per cent of the canola and three per cent of the oats remain to be harvested. Crop yields are variable across the region depending on excess moisture and disease. Regional average crop yields are as follows: spring wheat 38 bu/ac; oats 68 bu/ac; barley 56 bu/ac; flax 20 bu/ac; canola 28 bu/ac; lentils 452 lb./ac and peas 31 bu/ac.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into winter are rated as 69 per cent adequate and 31 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 71 per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and one per cent very short.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated increases of one per cent in both winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. Moisture conditions in most fields were suitable for seeding this fall.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.53; alfalfa/brome 1.49; other tame hay 1.09; wild hay 1.34 and greenfeed 1.94. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of hay (99 per cent), straw, greenfeed and feed grain (100 per cent) for their winter feeding needs.

The region has received large amounts of rain since July. According to the Crop Report records, the Frenchman Butte area has the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 501 mm. The Meadow Lake area came in second at 495 mm, and the third highest was the Glaslyn area with 494 mm. The St. Walburg area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 330 mm.

Producers are busy finishing up harvest, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales and putting equipment away.


Winter Wheat

% Standing % in swath

% ready to
straight combine

% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100
Fall Rye % Standing % in swath

% ready
to straight combine

% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE* 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100
* three per cent is rated as 'other'

Spring Wheat

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100

Durum

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100

Oats

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 1 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 1 3 0 96
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 2 1 97

Barley

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 1 0 99

Canaryseed

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 9 3 1 87
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 2 1 1 96
NE 0 0 0 100
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A

Lentils

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100

Peas

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 0 0 100
NW 0 0 0 100

Chickpeas

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 10 0 0 90
NE 0 0 0 100
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A

Canola

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE 0 1 0 99
NW 0 5 0 95

Mustard

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 3 97
NE 0 0 1 99
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A

Flax

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 3 0 0 97
SW 8 0 1 91
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 6 4 4 86
NE 0 6 1 93
NW 0 0 0 100

Triticale

% Standing % in swath % ready to
straight combine
% combined
SE 0 0 0 100
SW 0 0 0 100
EC 0 0 0 100
WC 0 0 0 100
NE N/A N/A N/A N/A
NW N/A N/A N/A N/A

 

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units



© 2017 Government of Saskatchewan. All rights reserved.