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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

One year ago
Five per cent of the 2012 crop had been seeded.  Some regions received over 100 mm of precipitation, delaying seeding operations.
 

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Warm and favourable weather has allowed seeding to begin in parts of southwestern and west-central Saskatchewan this week, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report.

However, the majority of producers are waiting for the soil to dry up before they can begin seeding.

A snowstorm brought significant precipitation to some parts of the province last Tuesday that has further delayed field work.  This week's precipitation ranged from trace amounts to almost two inches in the east-central area.  Many fields are still wet, although warm and windy weather has helped to dry some of them.

Provincially, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 40 per cent surplus, 58 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is 28 per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate and four per cent short.

Farmers are busy calving, cleaning seed, preparing machinery, doing pre-seeding field work and starting to seed.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Warm and windy weather has helped to melt much of the remaining snow that remained in the southeast; however, the quick melt in some areas has caused roads and fields to flood and more warm weather will be needed to help dry them. There have been reports of field work beginning in the southeast, although the majority of producers are at least a week or two away from the start of seeding.

Precipitation this week ranged from trace amounts to 30 mm in the Broadview area. The Kisbey and Stoughton areas received 2 mm of precipitation, the Whitewood area 18 mm, the Weyburn area 11 mm, the Vibank and Wilcox areas 8 mm, the Briercrest area 20 mm and the Ceylon area 12 mm. The Rocanville area has recorded the greatest amount of precipitation since April 1 (51 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 56 per cent surplus, 43 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 43 per cent surplus, 54 per cent adequate and three per cent short. CD 2B is reporting that 77 per cent of the cropland and 69 per cent of the hay land and pasture has surplus topsoil moisture.

Cattle are being moved to those pastures that have growth, although the majority will be moved in the coming weeks. Most crop reporters are indicating that field work and herbicide applications will begin soon on drier land. Farmers are busy working on equipment, finishing calving, checking fences and moving cattle to pasture.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Seeding and field work has begun in some areas of the region that received less precipitation this winter. There are reports of durum, canola, mustard and pulses being seeded. Although most producers will not begin to seed for another week or two, it is expected that many will begin this weekend.    

Most of the region received very little precipitation past week, although the Eyebrow area received 13 mm. The Bengough area received 10 mm, the Lisieux area 2 mm, the Stewart Valley area 9 mm and the Gravelbourg area 6 mm. The Admiral area has recorded the greatest amount of precipitation since April 1 (58 mm).  

Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as six per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short. CD 4A is reporting 28 per cent and 43 per cent, respectively, of cropland and hay land and pasture to be short of topsoil moisture

There are reports of grass fires in some areas. Some farmers have been able to apply fertilizer and herbicide on drier land, although many roads are still soft. Cattle are being moved to pasture in many areas. There have been reports that some seed treatments and glyphosate are in short supply. Farmers are busy seeding, finishing calving, getting equipment ready and working fields.


East Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Some areas of the region received significant amounts of precipitation last Tuesday that will further delay field work. Most crop reporters have indicated that it will be another week or more until seeding can begin due to excess moisture and soft fields.

The Stockholm area received the most precipitation this past week -  45 mm. The Langenburg area received 23 mm, the Saltcoats area 30 mm, the Roblin area 25 mm, the Kamsack area 10 mm, the Bethune area 35 mm and the Pelly, Craik and Quill Lake areas 15 mm. The Bethune area has received the greatest amount of precipitation in the region since April 1 (54 mm).

Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as 46 per cent surplus and 54 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 40 per cent surplus and 60 per cent adequate. CD 5A is reporting that 63 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively, of cropland and hay land and pasture have surplus topsoil moisture.

There have been reports of localized flooding in yards, homes and fields. Low spots and sloughs are full in some areas, and warm and windy days are needed to help dry fields. Some producers have been able to work drier fields and move equipment. Pastures are beginning to grow and cattle will be moved in the coming weeks. Farmers are finishing calving, working on equipment, attending auctions and working fields.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Some field work and seeding has begun in the west-central region, although cool temperatures and excess moisture is delaying most producers. The bulk of seeding will not begin for another week or two, according to the majority of crop reporters. There have been reports of localized flooding of some access roads, farmyards and fields.  

Most of the region received very little precipitation. The Conquest area received 2 mm, the Arelee area 3 mm and the Smiley area 1 mm. The Major area has received the greatest amount of precipitation since April 1 (38 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 40 per cent surplus, 59 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 29 per cent surplus and 71 per cent adequate. 

Cattle will be moved to pasture in the coming weeks, although plant growth has been slow. Most fields have large sloughs that will need warm and windy weather to dry. Many farmers are working on equipment, although there are reports that some machinery is still stuck in snow banks. Farmers are busy working fields, finishing calving, cleaning grain and hauling inputs back to the yard.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Seeding will be delayed in the northeastern region by at least two weeks due to excess moisture. Many fields and roads are flooded and warm temperatures will be needed to dry them. Pasture growth has been slow, which will delay the movement of cattle.

The majority of the region received trace amounts of precipitation last week. Since April 1, the Prince Albert area has recorded the greatest amount of precipitation (22 mm). 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 79 per cent surplus and 21 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 67 per cent surplus and 33 per cent adequate. CDs 9AE and 8A are reporting surplus topsoil moisture on 90 per cent and 80 per cent, respectively, of cropland.      

There are indications that some producers will begin field work in the next week if the warm temperatures continue. Most of the snow has melted, although there is still a significant amount along some treelines and in bush. Some producers are considering changing their seeding plans if the fields do not dry as quickly as expected. Farmers are busy finishing calving, hauling grain, working on equipment and cleaning seed.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Flooding and continued snow cover is causing issues for some producers in the region, although conditions are improving. The majority of seeding will be delayed for at least a couple of weeks until the fields dry. Some producers are considering changing their seeding plans if the excess moisture continues. 

The majority of the area did not receive any precipitation this week, although the Neilburg and Turtleford areas received 1 mm. Since April 1, the Turtleford area has received the most precipitation in the region (27 mm). 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 22 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and two per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 15 per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate and two per cent short. 

Many fields still have large amounts of standing water, and warm and windy weather will be needed to dry them out. Many roads are still closed and access to fields is restricted in some areas. Pastures are beginning to grow and cattle will be moved in the coming weeks. Farmers are busy finishing calving, working on equipment and hauling grain. 


Related Documents

Complete Crop Report In PDF format including all maps and tables.

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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