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      Tuesday, October 17, 2017

One year ago
Twenty-two per cent of the 2012 crop had been seeded.  Significant seeding progress was made due to warm and dry conditions.

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Seeding Progress in SK
Per cent seeded

All Crops

May 13/13

8

5 year avg.
(2008-2012)

16

May 14/12

22

May 9/11

5

May 13/10

5

May 11/09

23

May 11/08

25

Dry and sunny weather during the past week has resulted in good seeding progress in many areas of the province.  Provincially, eight per cent of crop has been seeded, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report.

Crop reporters indicate that seeding progress is at 29 per cent in the southwest; four per cent in the southeast; three per cent in the northwest; less than one per cent in the northeast; two per cent in the east-central region and three per cent in the west-central region.

Minimal precipitation was reported in most areas this past week, which allowed fields to dry and seeding to progress.  The five-year seeding progress average at this time of year is 16 per cent.

Provincially, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 24 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate and five per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is 16 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate and nine per cent short.

Farmers are busy seeding and fencing.  Most areas are a week to a couple of weeks behind and producers are hoping for warm weather to dry wet fields.

 


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Warm and windy weather continue to help speed up drying in most fields, allowing producers to begin seeding. The average seeding progress for the region is four per cent. A few RMs are reporting seeding progress at 10 per cent or above.  These include Kisbey at 10 per cent, Radville at 20 per cent and Ceylon at 25 per cent. 

Most areas in the southeast received no precipitation during the week. The only areas that reported precipitation above trace are Carnduff at six mm and Lampman at one mm. The Rocanville area has received the greatest amount of precipitation in the region since April 1, with 51 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 31 per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 23 per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate and five per cent short.  Crop District 1A is reporting that 15 per cent of the hay and pasture land has short topsoil moisture.

Farmers are busy getting things ready for seeding and with other activities such as checking fences and moving cattle to pasture.  Very little pre-seeding weed control has been reported.  This may be due to windy conditions and/or slow weed development.  Some producers are skipping pre-seeding weed control in order to speed up the seeding operation and are hoping to apply herbicide before the crop emerges.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Nice weather conditions have allowed producers in the southwest to make significant progress in seeding. The region is the most advanced in the province at 29 per cent seeding.  Seeding progress at various Crop Districts (CDs) in the region is reported as: 11 per cent in CD 3ASW; six per cent in CD 3AN; 46 per cent in CDs 3BS and 4A; 28 per cent in CD 3BN; and 47 per cent in CD 4B.  A few areas are reported to have seeded more than half of the intended crop.  These include Swift Current (60 per cent), Consul (65 per cent), Admiral (70 per cent), and Shaunavon and Gull Lake (80 per cent).

During the past week, precipitation ranged from trace to six mm with a regional average of 0.5 mm. Only a few areas reported above one mm of precipitation. These were Big Beaver (2 mm), Ceylon and Rockglen (3 mm) and Bengough (6 mm). The Admiral area has received the greatest amount of precipitation in the region since April 1 (58 mm).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 3 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and 17 per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 74 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and one per cent very short.

Farmers are busy with seeding, mending fences and moving cattle to pasture.  There are reports that a lot of areas are now in need of precipitation as the soil is too dry, especially for shallow seeded crops like canola.  Some producers are planning to switch to deeper-seeded crops where they can place the seed into moist soil.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6a)

Some areas of the region received small amounts of precipitation last Friday and Monday. Most crop reporters have indicated seeding can begin this week if no additional moisture is received.  Seeding progress is estimated at two per cent for the region, with Kenaston and Wynyard reported to be at 15 and 17 per cent seeding progress, respectively.

The largest amounts of precipitation last week were in the east-central. The Humboldt area received the most precipitation this past week at 20 mm. The Jensen area received 13 mm, the Kuroki area 11 mm, the Pelly area six mm, and the Foam Lake and Rama areas three mm. The Bethune area has received the greatest amount of precipitation in the region since April 1 (54 mm).

Topsoil moisture for cropland is rated as 20 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 18 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.

Warm and windy days have contributed to drying the fields; however, low spots and sloughs are still wet. Grassfires have occurred throughout the area this past week. Pastures are beginning to grow and cattle will be moved in the coming weeks. Farmers are working on machinery, fencing, applying fertilizer and working the fields.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Field work and seeding has begun in most of the west-central region, although there is snow in the trees and standing water in many areas. There are reports of fields and pasture too wet to access, as well as wash outs and road bans, due to wet conditions. Average seeding progress for the region is reported at three per cent with Biggar and Mantario reported to be at 10 and 31 per cent seeding progress, respectively.

Most of the region received very little precipitation. The Biggar area received one mm, the Dismore area received three mm and there were trace amounts in the Rosetown and Sonningdale areas. The Major area has received the greatest amount of precipitation since April 1 at 38 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 23 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and one per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 16 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and two per cent short.

Cattle have begun to be moved to pasture, although plant growth has been slow. Many fields have large sloughs that will need warm and windy weather to dry out. Where they can, farmers are harrowing, applying fertilizer, spraying and seeding the dryer areas of their land.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Seeding may be delayed in the northeastern region for another week due to excess moisture. Seeding progress for the region is reported to be less than one per cent.  Only a couple of areas are above one per cent, namely, Lake Lenore at2 per cent and Arborfield 3 per cent. Pasture growth has been slow, which will delay movement of cattle.

The majority of the region received trace amounts of precipitation this week.  The Tisdale area received two mm, and the Humboldt area one mm. Since April 1, the Humboldt area has recorded the greatest amount of precipitation (21 mm). 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 59 per cent surplus and 41 per cent adequate. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 57 per cent surplus and 43 per cent adequate. Crop District 9AE in particular is reporting high amounts of both cropland and hay and pasture to have surplus topsoil moisture.

Reports indicate that producers will begin field work in the next week if the warm temperatures continue. There is a significant amount of standing water throughout the area that has delayed most producers from seeding. Many fields and roads are still flooded although warm temperatures have helped dry them. Farmers are busy harrowing, applying fertilizer and spraying where they can.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Snow cover has been greatly reduced this week with favorable weather. The majority of seeding will be delayed for another week as many fields are too wet and field access is an issue. Seeding progress is reported to be at three per cent for the region. Areas with more advanced seeding progress include Neilburg and Lloydminister at 10 per cent and Barthel at 25 per cent. Pastures have started to grow; however, pasture access is also difficult in many areas.

The majority of the region received very little precipitation last week. The Radisson and Meadow Lake areas received two mm.  Since April 1, the Dorintosh area has received the most precipitation for the region (28 mm). 

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 19 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as nine per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and two per cent short. 

Warm and windy weather will be needed to allow more general seeding to begin this week as fields are still too wet. Many roads are still closed and access to fields is restricted in some areas.  Cooler temperatures have slowed down pasture growth; more cattle will be moved out in the coming week.  Farmers are busy working on equipment, harrowing, applying fertilizer and spraying. 


Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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