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    Wednesday, October 01, 2014

One year ago
Ninety-two per cent of the 2012 provincial hay crop was cut and 81 per cent was baled or put into silage. One per cent of the provincial crop had been combined and three per cent had been swathed or was ready to
straight-cut.

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Saskatchewan livestock producers have 90 per cent of the 2013 hay crop cut and 75 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report

Rain during the past week has slowed haying progress and reduced hay quality in the swath. Eight per cent of the provincial hay crop is rated as excellent in quality, 73 per cent is good in quality and 19 per cent is reported to be fair in quality.

Cool and wet weather continued for most areas in the province, delaying crop development. The majority of crops are podding and filling. There are reports of some crops starting to turn and desiccation of peas and lentils has just started in some areas of the southwest and west-central regions.

Most parts of the province received varying amounts of rain last week ranging from nil to 64 mm. Insects, flooding, hail and wind caused some crop damage.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on crop land is rated as nine per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate, 13 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 77 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Pasture conditions are rated as 16 per cent excellent, 64 per cent good, 19 per cent fair and one per cent poor. Livestock have adequate water availability.

Farmers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest.

  Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Reminder

The deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat is August 25.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

Continued cool weather has delayed crop development. Most areas continue to receive rain, which has made haying difficult. There has been some loss of hay quality in the swath due to rain. The cool weather has allowed the standing hay crop to keep some quality this late in the season. Most crops are in the podding and filling stages, with some of the later seeded crops finishing up flowering. Rainfall recorded in the region ranged from nil to 64 mm (Manor area). Many crop reporters have indicated crops are 10 days to two weeks behind in development compared to the last couple of years. 

Despite the wet weather, livestock producers have progressed with haying operations. Eighty-eight per cent of the hay crop is cut and 66 per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 10 per cent excellent, 67 per cent good and 23 per cent fair. Greenfeed crops will be ready to cut in the next week or so.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 22 per cent surplus, 70 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Hay land and pasture moisture is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 70 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and two per cent very short.  Crop district 1A is reporting 61 per cent and 54 per cent of cropland and hay acres, respectively, to have surplus topsoil moisture. 

Rain throughout July has kept the pastures green and growing. Seventeen per cent of the pastures are rated in excellent condition, 64 per cent in good condition, 17 per cent in fair and two per cent in poor condition. Availability of livestock water is 100 per cent adequate.

The majority of crop damage is due to hail, wind and flooding.  The Frobisher, Glenavon and Wilcox areas reported hail damage. Grasshoppers, Bertha Armyworm and disease have caused crop damage in some areas. Producers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest.            


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Harvest operations have just started for some producers with desiccation of peas and lentils this week. These areas have not received significant amounts of rain over the past few weeks and so crops are coming into maturity a little quicker when compared to the rest of the province. Some producers in the Swift Current, Stewart Valley and Gull Lake area have started desiccating peas and lentils. Other areas in the southwest are indicating crops are 10 days to two weeks behind normal in crop development compared to the last couple of years. Some warm and dry weather is needed.

Haying operations are nearing completion with 91 per cent of the hay crop cut and 83 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay crop quality is rated as three per cent excellent, 77 per cent good and 20 per cent fair. Most areas in the region received rain this past week, ranging from nil to 61 mm (Fife Lake area).

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 88 per cent adequate and 12 short. Crop district 4B is reporting 33 per cent short of topsoil moisture on cropland and hay land. Pasture conditions are rated as 14 per cent excellent, 76 per cent good, eight per cent fair and two per cent poor. Livestock water availability is 100 per cent adequate.

Hail, wind, insects and disease have caused the majority of crop damage. Hail damage was reported in the Vanguard, Bracken and Orkney areas. Loonie-sized hail, two inches deep in some places, caused some severe crop damage in the Bracken and Orkney area.

Farmers are busy haying and getting harvest equipment ready.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

Cool and wet weather again this week has slowed crop development and haying progress. Warm temperatures are needed to help advance crops. Frequent rain showers have decreased hay quality in the swath. Most crops are podding and filling. Many producers are indicating crops are about two weeks behind normal in development compared to the last couple of years. Precipitation recorded ranged from nil to 24 mm (Langenburg area).

Livestock producers now have 85 per cent of the hay crop cut and 66 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as three per cent excellent, 67 per cent good and 30 per cent fair.  Pasture conditions are rated as 18 per cent excellent, 60 per cent good and 22 per cent fair. Some pastures have received too much moisture and so some areas have flooding stress. Availability of livestock water is 100 per cent adequate.

Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 93 per cent adequate and four per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 89 per cent adequate and six per cent short. 

The majority of crop damage this week is due to disease and hail. Ascochyta and sclerotinia in pulses and smut in cereals has been reported in some areas. Winter cereals are starting to turn.

Farmers are busy haying and getting equipment ready for harvest.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Most areas of the region recorded some rainfall for the week which will help crops on dry soil fill as harvest operations near. Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks. Crops are slowly advancing in the cool weather; however, there are some reports of pulses being desiccated in the Perdue, Major and Marengo areas. Most other areas are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years. Rainfall reported in the past week ranged from nil to 37 mm (Landis area).

The west-central region is furthest ahead in haying and operations are nearing completion. Livestock producers have 96 per cent of the hay crop cut and 82 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as eight per cent excellent, 88 per cent good and four per cent fair. Pasture conditions are rated as nine per cent excellent, 56 per cent good, 33 per cent fair and two per cent poor. Ninety-seven per cent of producers have adequate water supplies for their livestock.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and four per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 51 per cent adequate, 41 per cent short and seven per cent very short.  Crop District 7B is reporting 46 and 48 per cent short of topsoil moisture on cropland and hay, respectively.

Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions and insects are causing the majority of crop stress.

Producers are busy haying and getting ready for harvest.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Crops are in good condition for the most part, although some heat is needed to advance maturity of the crops. Less rain this week compared to the last couple of weeks has allowed for field conditions to dry up and relieve some moisture stress of crops. Early seeded crops are started to turn. Most crops are in the podding and filling stages of development. Most producers have indicated harvest is 10 days to two weeks behind normal. Haying progress is slow due to rain interruptions. There are reports of hay quality loss in the swath due to moisture. Rainfall in the region ranged from nil to 12 mm (Lake Lenore area).

Good hay progress was made last week and livestock producers now have 92 per cent of the hay crop cut and 80 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 27 per cent excellent, 55 per cent good and 18 per cent fair. All producers are reporting adequate water supplies for their livestock.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 19 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as 11 per cent surplus, 88 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Crop district 8A is reporting 33 per cent of their respective cropland acres to have surplus moisture.   

Very little crop damage was reported this week. Reported crop damage is attributed to flooding and disease. 

Producers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.    


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Cool weather has delayed crop maturity. Most producers are indicating harvest operations are about 10 days behind normal for this time of year. The region has not received significant rain over the past few weeks so crops are showing signs of dry conditions in some cases. Some warm weather would be appreciated to help advance the crop. There are reports of cereal crops starting to turn in some areas. Precipitation ranged from nil to 17 mm (St.Walburg area).   

Livestock producers made good progress with haying in the past week. Eighty-eight per cent of the hay crop is cut and 74 per cent baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 17 per cent excellent, 78 per cent good and five per cent fair. In the Turtlford area, 11 days without rain allowed for hay swaths to be wrapped up.

Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as three per cent surplus, 61 per cent adequate, 32 per cent short and four per cent very short. Topsoil moisture on hay land and pasture is reported as two per cent surplus, 65 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and four per cent very short. Crop district 9AW is reporting 55 and 51 per cent short on crop land and hay and pasture land topsoil moisture, respectively.

The majority of crop damage this week is attributed to insects and flooding. Grasshoppers have been reported to be causing damage on the outside edges of fields in the Barthel, Meadow Lake, Dorintosh and Pierceland areas.

Producers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.  

Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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