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       Monday, October 23, 2017

Saskatchewan Agriculture has a group of 233 volunteer crop reporters from across the province. Thank you for your valued dedication to the crop report. In 2013, there are 11 crop reporters reaching their 20 year milestone; eight reaching 25 years; four reaching 30 years and two reaching 35 years of crop reporting.
Congratulations!!

 

One year ago
Crop yields were average.  Seventy-seven per cent of the spring wheat, 78 per cent of the lentils, 89 per cent of the peas and 95 per cent of the canola are expected to fall within the top two grades.

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Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Reminder

October 31- Deadline to pay 2013 insurance premiums without interest charged.  November 15- Deadline to submit Production Declarations, yield loss claims, extensions of insurance and fall seeded acreage report.

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop has been harvested, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's Weekly Crop Report.

Harvest weather was favourable for most of the province, allowing producers to pull off well-above-average yields and above-average crop quality.  For example, average yields for spring wheat and canola are 35 and 36 per cent higher, respectively, than the 10-year average (2003 to 2012).  Average yields for spring wheat are reported as 46 bushels per acre, durum 45 bushels per acre, oats 91 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre, peas 43 bushels per acre and lentils 1,700 lb. per acre.  The majority of crops are rating average to above-average in quality and are reported as falling within the top two quality grades.

Most regions have the majority of the crop in the bin.  There are some areas in the southeastern and east-central regions that are 95 per cent combined.  These areas have experienced significant rainfall throughout the growing and harvest seasons, resulting in some yield and quality loss.  Some flax, chickpeas, canaryseed and oats are still being combined.

Average hay yields on dry land are reported as 1.7 tons per acre (alfalfa and alfalfa/brome hay), 1.3 tons per acre (other tame hay), 1.2 tons per acre (wild hay) and two tons per acre (greenfeed). On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.3 tons per acre (alfalfa hay), 3.4 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome hay) and four tons per acre (other tame hay and greenfeed).  Cattle producers have adequate to surplus winter feed supplies.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as four per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 22 per cent short and 12 per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 60 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and 14 per cent very short.  The west-central and northwestern regions are the driest regions of the province.

The number of acres seeded to winter wheat is on par with 2012; however, due to a late harvest, wet conditions in some areas and dry soil conditions in other regions, the number of acres seeded has decreased in the east-central, west-central and northeastern regions compared to the previous year.  Acres seeded to winter wheat have increased in parts of the south.

Producers are busy finishing fall field work, hauling bales and bringing cattle home from pastures.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 1 - Carnduff, Estevan, Redvers, Moosomin and Kipling areas; Crop District 2 - Weyburn, Milestone, Moose Jaw, Regina and Qu'Appelle areas; Crop District 3ASE - Radville and Lake Alma areas)

The region has 98 per cent of the crop in the bin. Crop District 1A has four per cent of the crop still left to combine, mostly of flax, canaryseed, oats and barley. Crop yields are quite variable across the region, depending on excess moisture received throughout the growing season. Yields on wheat range from 20 to 60 bu/ac, canola 25 to 45 bu/ac, peas 30 to 60 bu/ac and lentils 1200 to 1800 lb./ac. 

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 13 per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate and 23 per cent short.  On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 55 per cent adequate, 26 per cent short and 14 per cent very short.  Crop districts 1A and 1B are reporting 33 and 21 per cent, respectively, of cropland has surplus topsoil moisture. 

Crop reporters in the region have estimated an increase of 19 per cent in winter wheat acres over 2012.  

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.6; alfalfa/brome 1.7; other tame hay 1.3; wild hay 1.1 and greenfeed 2.4.  The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed, grain).

Producers are busy bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales, working fields and putting machinery away. 


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 3ASW - Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN - Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B - Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 - Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas)

Harvest is pretty well complete for the region. Seven per cent of the flax and three per cent of the chickpeas are still to be combined. Crop yields and quality are well-above-average for the region; however, there are areas where yields and quality were reduced due to moisture during the growing harvest seasons.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as three per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and 12 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 88 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and two per cent very short. 

Crop reporters in the region have estimated an increase of four per cent in winter wheat acres over 20102. 

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa, alfalfa/brome and wild hay 1.4; other tame hay 1.0 and greenfeed 1.8. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate feed supplies (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain) going into the winter.

The soil moisture conditions in the region have worsened since summer. 

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, cleaning up yards and corrals, working fields and putting equipment away. 


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop District 5 - Melville, Yorkton, Cupar, Kamsack, Foam Lake, Preeceville and Kelvington areas; Crop District 6A - Lumsden, Craik, Watrous and Clavet areas)

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop has been combined. There are a few fields of canaryseed, flax and oats left to be combined.  Crop yields are quite variable, depending on moisture received during the growing and harvest seasons. Crop yields for spring wheat range from 34 to 85 bu/ac, canola 25 to 50 bu/ac, barley 50 to 100 bu/ac and peas 28 to 50 bu/ac.   

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as three per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and one per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate, 23 per cent short and six per cent very short. 

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a decrease of 20 per cent in winter wheat acres compared to 2012. This is largely due a late harvest and lack of soil moisture this fall (mostly in CD 6A), resulting in concerns over poor germination.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and alfalfa/brome 1.6; other tame hay 1.5; wild hay 1.3 and greenfeed 2.6.  The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus feed supplies (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain) for their winter feeding needs.

Producers are busy hauling bales and grain, cleaning up yards and corrals, monitoring bins, working fields and putting equipment away.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B - Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 - Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Harvest is pretty well wrapped up for the region. There are only a few flax fields still waiting to be combined. Crop yields on spring wheat range from 35 to 55 bu/ac, durum 38 to 60 bu/ac, oats 60 to 105 bu/ac, canola 35 to 45 bu/ac and lentils 1100 to 2700 lb./ac.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 21 per cent adequate, 27 per cent short and 52 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent adequate, 31 per cent short and 44 per cent very short.  Most areas have not received significant moisture since the end of July.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a decrease of nine per cent in winter wheat acres compared to 2012, mainly due to concerns about dry soil and poor germination.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.9; alfalfa/brome and other tame hay1.6; wild hay 1.3 and greenfeed 2.3.  Irrigated hay average yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 3.5; alfalfa/brome 5.0; other tame hay 4.0; wild hay 3.3 and greenfeed 5.0. The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus feed supplies (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain) for their winter feeding needs. 

Producers are busy cleaning corrals, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales, monitoring bins and putting equipment away.  A significant rainfall before winter would be welcomed by most producers.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop District 8 - Hudson Bay, Tisdale, Melfort, Carrot River, Humboldt, Kinistino, Cudworth and Aberdeen areas; Crop District 9AE - Prince Albert, Choiceland and Paddockwood areas)

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop is in the bin. Six per cent of the flax has yet to be combined, and there are a few fields of canaryseed and oats still uncombined as well. Regional average crop yields range from 35 to 65 bu/ac on spring wheat, 70 to 140 bu/ac on oats, 25 to 50 bu/ac on canola and 25 to 70 bu/ac on peas.  

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as two per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and two per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 61 per cent adequate, 20 per cent short and 18 per cent very short.  In Crop District 8A, 25 per cent of cropland has surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a decrease of 28 per cent in winter wheat acres over 2012. 

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.1; alfalfa/brome 2.3; other tame hay 1.8; wild hay 1.4 and greenfeed 2.3.  The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus feed supplies (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain) for their winter feeding needs. 

Producers are busy finishing up harvest, cleaning corrals and yards, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales and grain, monitoring bins and putting equipment away. 


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop District 9AW - Shellbrook, North Battleford, Big River and Hafford areas; Crop District 9B - Meadow Lake, Turtleford, Pierceland, Maidstone and Lloydminster areas)

Harvest is essentially complete in the region. Five per cent of the flax is left to be combined and there are a few fields of oats waiting for the combine as well. Crop yields are variable and range from 38 to 60 bu/ac on spring wheat, canola 30 to 55 bu/ac and  35 to 60 bu/ac on peas.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into winter are rated as one per cent surplus, 32 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and 22 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 22 per cent adequate, 55 per cent short and 23 per cent very short.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa and alfalfa/brome 2.1; other tame hay 1.4; wild hay 1.0 and greenfeed 2.2.  The majority of livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus supplies of feed (hay, straw, greenfeed and grain) for their winter feeding needs. 

Producers are busy finishing up harvest, bringing cattle home from pasture, hauling bales and putting equipment away.  Most producers would like a good rain to replenish topsoil moisture.  


 

Provincial Estimated Crop Yields- October 22, 2013

Crop yield predictions at this point in time. Please keep in mind these are regional averages, and yields can vary greatly across an area. 

Winter wheat

Fall rye

Spring wheat

Durum

Oat

Barley

Flax

Southeast

47

44

46

48

77

66

27

Southwest

41

39

41

43

66

67

29

East-central

48

37

50

52

93

75

31

West-central

40

33

46

45

76

65

27

Northeast

44

40

44

N/A

101

69

29

Northwest 

N/A

N/A

48

N/A

97

74

25

Province

46

38

46

45

91

69

28

10 yr prov avg
(2003-2012)

41

35

34

33

69

51

20

 

Canola

Mustard

Pea

Lentil 

Canaryseed

Chickpea

Sunflower

Southeast

40

1130

39

1460

1130

1380

N/A

Southwest

36

1330

42

1830

1220

1700

N/A

East-central

39

1390

42

1890

1400

1350

N/A

West-central

39

1300

45

1760

1420

1800

N/A

Northeast

36

N/A

43

N/A

1540

N/A

N/A

Northwest 

40

N/A

47

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Province

38

1300

43

1730

1310

1700

N/A

10 yr prov avg
(2003-2012)

28

777

31

1237

970

1360

N/A

Mustard, lentil, canaryseed, chickpea and sunflower in lbs/ac. All other crops in bu/ac.
Related Links

Short-term and long-term weather forecasts including P.O.P and precip accumulation; almanac data including sunrise/sunset times; and daily planning forecasts including drying index, growing degree days and crop heat units.



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