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      Friday, December 15, 2017
1 Year Ago
Pre-harvest estimates indicated a production of 23.9 million tonnes of grains, oilseeds, and specialty crops.

Recent heat and lack of precipitation decreased yield expectations.

Less than one per cent of the 2007 crop had been combined, and two per cent was lying in the swath or was ready to be straight combined.

Pre-harvest crop production estimates indicate that Saskatchewan farmers are expected to harvest 25.35 million tonnes of grains, oilseeds, and specialty crops, according to the crop reporters who provide the information for Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly crop report. 

This estimate, if realized, would result in a crop that is eight per cent above 2007 production, and seven per cent above the 10-year average.  Yield projections will continue to be monitored throughout the harvest period and new estimates will be provided if production estimates change significantly.  Statistics Canada's July production estimate will be released on August 22, 2008.

Harvest operations are just getting underway, with some spring wheat and fall rye swathed in the southwest.  There is yield variability both at the local and regional levels.  Many crop reporters indicate that they will have a better read on yields once combines are in the field.  In general, crops are still one to two weeks behind the normal state of development for this time of year.

Topsoil moisture conditions remain similar to last week with 79 per cent of the crop land and 71 per cent of the hay and pasture land reported as having adequate topsoil moisture. 

Fifty-six per cent of the first-cut hay crop has been baled or put into silage.  To date, none of the second-cut hay crop has been baled or put into silage, and almost three-quarters of those reporting indicated they do not expect a second cut of hay in their district.     

Pasture conditions have improved since the end of May.  Fifty-eight per cent of reporters rated pastures as good to excellent, compared with 22 per cent providing that rating in May. 

Livestock water supplies have also improved since the end of May, with 89 per cent reporting adequate supplies, compared with 79 per cent in May.

Insects caused the most crop damage during the past week.  Other sources of damage included flooding, hail, wind, drought, disease and gophers.


South eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 1, 2, & 3ase)

The south eastern region was warm and humid last week with some thundershower activity. An average of 22 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of 11 mm, reported in Crop District (CD) 1a, to an average high of 42 mm, reported in CD 3ase.  Flooding damage to crops was reported in the Broadview area; wind damage was reported in the Stoughton area; drought damage was reported in the Gainborough and Lampman areas; lodging was reported in the Odessa and Indian Head areas; and hail damage was reported in the Briercrest, Minton, and Ceylon areas.  Some areas in the southeast received hail on Sunday, July 27 and this will be reported on more extensively next week.     

Crop yield estimates indicate that the southeast could see the highest average chickpea yield and the lowest average durum and canary seed yields in the province.  Crops remain one to two weeks behind in development in the region.     

Topsoil moisture conditions improved slightly this past week.  Eighty-three per cent of crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture compared with 81% last week.  Seventy-two per cent of the hay and pasture land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture conditions, compared to 70% last week.  In comparison, last year at this time, 65% to 75% of the land had short or very short topsoil moisture. 

Damage from wheat midge was reported across the region.  Other insect damage came from cutworms (Frobisher), grasshoppers (Oxbow, Kisbey, Weyburn, Radville, Ceylon), diamondback moth larvae (Ceylon), and aphids (Lampman, Kennedy, Montmartre, Moose Jaw).  There was some spraying for grasshoppers.  Disease damage came from sclerotinia (Kennedy), net blotch (Montmartre), tan spot (Ceylon), glume blotch (Grenfell), and unspecified leaf diseases (Kennedy).     

First-cut haying operations continue in the southeast with 57% baled or silaged, and an additional 20% lying in the swath.  Quality is generally expected to be good.  Many reporters do not expect a second cut in their area. 

Pasture conditions have dramatically improved since the end of May.  Fifty-nine per cent of the reporters rate pasture conditions as good to excellent compared with 4% in May.  Livestock water supplies have also improved with 89% of the area having adequate supplies, up from 71% in late May. 


 South western Saskatchewan
(CDs 3asw, 3an, 3b, & 4)

The past week was warm with some storms in the southwest.  An average of 7 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of less than ½ mm reported in CD 4a, to an average high of 24 mm, reported in CD 3asw.  Hail damage was reported in the Rockglen, Glentworth, Cadillac, Mankota, Admiral, Rush Lake, Shaunavon, and Burstall areas.  Wind damage was reported in the Ponteix and Maple Creek areas.  Drought damage was reported in the Orkney, Hazenmore, Spring Valley, Lucky Lake, and Shaunavon areas.  Rain damage was reported in the Bengough area.  Heat stress was reported in the Hazenmore, Glenbain, and Eastend areas. 

Swathing of spring wheat has started in the Lucky Lake area.  Swathing of fall rye has started in the Lucky Lake, Hazenmore, and Maple Creek areas.  Combining of peas is expected to start within a week or so. 

In the south western region, spring wheat, oats, barley, triticale, flax, canola, mustard, and field peas are expected to have the lowest average yields in the province.     

Topsoil moisture conditions declined, with 69% of the crop land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 78% last week.  For hay and pasture land, 58% is rated with adequate topsoil moisture conditions, compared to 65% last week.

Grasshoppers and gophers caused crop damage in many areas across the region.  Other insect damage came from aphids (Bengough), diamondback moth larvae (Glentworth), and wheat midge (Central Butte, Lucky Lake).  Some farmers were spraying for wheat midge.  Diseases reported include tan spot (Rush Lake) and ascochyta blight (Stewart Valley, Kyle).  Fungicide was being applied for ascochyta blight.     

Haying operations are continuing in the southwest with 77% of the first-cut hay either baled or put into silage, and a further 15% is lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be good.  Many do not expect a second cut.

Pasture conditions have improved significantly since the end of May.  Fifty-five per cent of the reporters rate pasture conditions as good to excellent compared with 22% in May.  Seventy-one per cent of the area has adequate livestock water supplies, compared to 53% in late May.  Farmers in the Mossbank area have been hauling water for their stock for 3 months.  

Some farmers were working on their chemfallow and others were cleaning out bins and hauling bales.   


 East central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 5 & 6a)

The east central region was generally hot and humid during the past week.  An average of 19 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of 13 mm reported in CDs 5b and 6a, to an average high of 32 mm reported in CD 5a.  Damage from flooding and heavy rains was reported in the Langenburg, Saltcoats, Ituna, Wroxton, Yorkton, Kamsack, Insinger, and Preeceville areas.  There was lodging in wheat, barley, and peas.  Hail damage was reported in the Foam Lake, Quill Lake, Holdfast, Young, Leroy, and Humboldt areas.        

Yield estimates of winter wheat, sunflowers and field peas in this region are expected to set the highest regional averages in the province.  Reporters estimate that crops are two to three weeks away from harvest.   

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland remained similar to last week, with 83% of the crop land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture.  Conditions deteriorated slightly on hay and pasture land with 81% rated as having adequate topsoil moisture conditions, compared to 84% last week.

Wheat midge caused crop damage across the region.  Other insect damage came from aphids (Saltcoats, Ituna, Quill Lake, Bethune, Holdfast, Imperial, Leroy), flea beetles (Veregin), grasshoppers (Bethune), alfalfa beetles (Jedburgh), and diamondback moth larvae (Neudorf).  Disease pressures came from rust (Leroy), ascochyta blight (Leroy), tan spot (Quill Lake, Leroy), and other unspecified diseases (Neudorf, Preeceville, Kelvington, Holdfast.  Spraying last week took place for wheat midge, aphids, and leaf diseases.      

First-cut haying operations are progressing, with 41% baled or silaged, and a further 24% lying in swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Many reporters do not expect to see a second cut in their areas. 

Pasture conditions have improved significantly since the end of May.  Crop reporters rate 80% of their pastures in good to excellent condition, compared with 5% at the end of May.  Reporters indicated that 98% of their region has adequate livestock water supplies, compared to 92% in late May. 


West central Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 6b & 7)

The west central region was hot most of this past week, with some thundershower activity.  An average of 11 mm of precipitation was reported during the past week, ranging from an average low of 6 mm reported in CD 6b, to an average high of 13 mm reported in CD 7b.  Drought damage was reported in the Outlook, Herschel, and Denzil areas.  Damage from heat stress was reported in the Conquest and Biggar areas.  Hail damage was reported in the Marengo, Kerrobert, and Battleford areas.  Lodging of crops was reported in the Biggar and Battleford areas.          

Area yield estimates of canary seed are the highest regional yield in the province, while estimated yields of winter wheat, fall rye, sunflowers, lentils, and chickpeas are the lowest in the province.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land remain similar to last week, with 67% rated as having adequate topsoil moisture.  Conditions are also similar to last week on hay and pasture land with 54% rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 56% last week.  Farmers in the Outlook, Grandora, and Harris areas are looking for a rain for their crops.       

Wheat midge damaged crops across the region.  Other insect damage came from diamondback moth larvae (Kerrobert), bertha armyworms (Kerrobert), and grasshoppers (Marengo, Herschel).  Disease pressures came from rust (Conquest), ascochyta blight (Conquest), smut (Eston, Hanley), and unspecified disease in the Unity area.  Insecticides and fungicides were applied this past week.       

Cutting and baling the 2008 hay crop continues with 60% baled or silaged, and a further 22% is lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Many reporters do not expect to harvest a second cut.  Some cutting of a second cut has begun in the Hanley area. 

Pasture conditions are similar to the end of May.  Crops reporters rate 48% of their pastures in good to excellent condition, compared with 50% giving the same ratings in May.  Reporters rate 96% of their region as having adequate livestock water supplies, the same as in late May.


 North eastern Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 8 & 9ae)

The north eastern region had a sunny, warm week.  An average of 21 mm of precipitation was reported, ranging from an average low of 15 mm reported in CD 8a, to an average high of 50 mm reported in CD 9ae.  Flooding caused crop damage in the Melfort and Garrick areas.  Hail damage was reported in the Tisdale area.  Lodging from wind and rain was reported in the Vonda area. 

Current yield estimates indicate that north eastern yields are the highest in the province for spring wheat, durum, oats, barley, fall rye, triticale, mustard, and lentils.  Reporters estimate the crop is a week behind in development.

Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland improved this past week, with 93% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 88% last week.  Conditions also improved on hay and pasture land, with 87% of the land rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared to 82% last week.     

Wheat midge caused crop damage in several areas across the region.  Unspecified diseases caused crop damage in the Humboldt area.     

Haying operations are progressing and 52% of the 2008 crop is baled or silaged, and a further 27% is lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good.  Many reporters do not expect a second cut in their area.  In the Tisdale area, some second growth alfalfa is less then six inches in height.   

Pastures have improved since the end of May.  Fifty-six per cent of reporters rated pastures in good to excellent condition, compared to 32% in May.  Livestock water supplies are rated as adequate by almost all reporters.    


North western Saskatchewan
(Crop Districts 9aw & 9b)

The north western region was warm last week.  An average of 10 mm of precipitation was reported during the past week, ranging from an average low of 6 mm reported in CD 9b, to an average high of 14 mm reported in CD 9aw.  Heavy rain caused crop damage in the Debden area.  Wind damage was reported in the North Battleford area while drought damage was reported in the Neilburg area.   

Current yield estimates indicate that north western yields are the highest in the province for spring wheat, flax, and canola.

Topsoil moisture conditions on crop land deteriorated this past week.  Eighty-seven per cent of the crop land was rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 94% last week.  Rain is needed in the Shellbrook area.  Eighty-six per cent of hay and pasture land was rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, compared with 78% last week.   

Wheat midge caused crop damage across the region, and spraying was underway.  Flea beetles caused damaged in the North Battleford area.   

Haying operations are progressing with 41% of the crop baled or silaged, and a further 27% is lying in the swath.  Quality is expected to be fair to good. Many reporters do not expect to see a second cut in their area. 

Pasture conditions have improved slightly since May, with 45% of reporters now rating pastures as good to excellent, compared to 41% in late May.  Livestock water availability is rated as adequate by almost all reporters. 


Saskatchewan Crop Production Estimate

July 27, 2008

 

2008

1998-2007 average

 

acres*

prod'n

acres

prod'n

 

'000

bu/ac

'000 t

'000

bu/ac

'000 t

winter wheat

 530

36.4

 525.0

 

 170.0

37.0

 172.7

spring wheat

7 370

32.1

6 440.0

 

9 122.3

29.9

7 448.3

durum

4 970

30.5

4 125.0

 

4 447.0

29.7

3 584.8

oats

1 635

67.4

1 700.0

 

1 586.5

59.3

1 462.9

barley

3 275

52.7

3 760.0

 

4 035.0

47.8

4 208.2

fall rye

 135

32.1

 110.0

 

 144.0

31.9

 120.7

tritcale

 20

29.5

 15.0

 

 28.7

36.1

 26.3

flax

1 120

19.3

 550.0

 

1 232.0

18.2

 575.5

canola

7 280

26.8

4 425.0

 

5 810.5

24.1

3 221.4

field peas

2 810

32.0

2 450.0

 

2 203.5

29.5

1 764.8

  subtotal

29 145

 

 24 100

28 779.5

22 585.6

 

 

lbs/ac

 

 

 

lb/ac

 

mustard

 345

959

150.0

 

 468.0

 739

 158.9

lentils

1 475

1 256

 840.0

 

1 365.0

1 080

 677.2

canary seed

 360

1 041

170.0

 

 439.0

 869

 172.5

chick peas

 170

1 167

90.0

 

 347.5

 1 108

 168.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

31 495.0

 

25 350.0

31 399.0

23 763.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* estimated harvested area

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Growing Degree Days Above 5ºC
calculations based on temperatures given by crop reporters

R.M.

Since April 1

 

Jul 20-26

Total

3

786.5

 

117

903.5

17A

699.5

*

103.5

803

38B

715

*

117

832

43A

834.65

 

114.2

948.85

43B

n/a

 

107.75

 

44

679

*

113.5

792.5

67

n/a

 

105

 

68

974.95

 

114.95

1089.9

72

592.05

*

107.35

699.4

73B

701.5

 

105

806.5

75

n/a

 

119.95

 

76A

730.5

*

113.6

844.1

78A

613.5

*

111

724.5

97

773.185

 

110.3

883.485

111A

884.1

 

113

997.1

123

526.5

*

99

625.5

124

n/a

 

95.25

 

127

n/a

 

104.55

 

132

684.5

*

102.5

787

138

n/a

 

120

 

141

799.65

*

101.45

901.1

151B

679.95

 

106.9

786.85

166

758

*

114.5

872.5

167

703

*

102

805

186

n/a

 

93.9

 

190

n/a

 

114.4

 

193

817.1

 

108.55

925.65

221

719.75

*

103.65

823.4

222

n/a

 

124

 

226

n/a

 

99

 

246

640.85

 

99.15

740

252

n/a

 

104.25

 

259

n/a

 

108.85

 

271

648

*

96

744

276

n/a

 

96.5

 

277

702.05

*

106.25

808.3

283

739.25

*

106.15

845.4

285

823.65

 

108.95

932.6

318A

721.5

*

82

803.5

336

n/a

 

109

 

339

667.75

 

101.25

769

343

843.3

 

110.95

954.25

370

658.5

*

102.5

761

379

665.75

*

95.1

760.85

397

n/a

 

99.25

 

428

708.5

*

106.5

815

429B

696.5

*

105.5

802

442

677

 

95

772

456

555

 

94.5

649.5

488

n/a

 

106.95

 

496

628

*

105

733

502

727

 

101

828

* missing 1 to 7 days of data

A degree day is defined as a measure of the departure of temperature for a day from some reference temperature.  They are expressed in degrees of temperature.

For plant growth, a base of 5ºC is generally used, although the base varies for each plant species and, in fact, varies throughout the life of the plant from germination to maturity.  By accumulating degree days throughout the growing season, it is possible to forecast harvesting dates. 


For further information contact:

Terry Bedard, P.Ag.
Ministry of Agriculture
Agricultural Economist
Policy Branch
Telephone:  306-787-5956

Related Documents
CR #17.pdf  ( 273.9 KB )


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