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      Friday, December 15, 2017

October 13, 2011

One year ago
Eighty-three per cent of the 2010 crop had been combined, an increase of 23 per cent over the previous week. Regional harvest progress ranged from 79 to 87 per cent complete.

Harvest Progress in SK
Per cent combined
All Crops

Oct 10/11

99

5 year avg. (2006-2010)

90

Oct 11/10

83

Oct 19/09

77

Oct 12/08

97

Oct 14/07

96

Oct 15/06

98

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop has been harvested, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report. The five-year (2006-2010) provincial average for this time of year is 90 per cent combined. Weeks of warm and dry harvest weather allowed Saskatchewan producers to get the 2011 crop in the bin in good quality.

The northwestern region has 97 per cent combined and all other regions are reporting 99 per cent of the crop is in the bin.  Eighty-nine per cent of the flax and 99 per cent of the canola has been combined.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as four per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 61 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and seven per cent very short. Rain was recorded in many areas of the province last week. 

The number of acres in the southeast seeded to winter wheat and fall rye has increased 74 and 13 per cent, respectively, relative to 2010, but this is due to the low number of acres seeded to fall cereals in 2010 and the large number of unseeded acres in 2011. The number of winter wheat acres in the east-central region has increased 16 per cent over last year. 

Cattle producers have more-than-adequate winter hay supplies. However, some producers are indicating there will be a shortage of winter straw supplies, particularly in the south-east.  

In general, crop yields are reported to be average to above-average, with the exception of those areas in the south and southeast that received excess moisture in the spring.  Crop quality and grade are generally good. Eighty-five per cent of the spring wheat, 77 per cent of the durum, 88 per cent of the lentils, 92 per cent of the peas and 95 per cent of the canola are expected to fall within the top two grades.

 

Saskatchewan Agriculture has a group of 230 volunteer crop reporters from across the province.
Thank you for your valued dedication to the crop report.
In 2011, there are five crop reporters each reaching their 20, 25 and 30 year milestone.
One crop reporter has been reporting for 35 years. Congratulations!!
Thank you to our 23 new crop reporters who joined the Crop report in 2011.

 

2011 Overview (Conditions as report on Oct.13)

The warm and clear summer and harvest weather of 2011 allowed producers to harvest the crop in good condition.  Many producers in the southeast and other parts of the south did not get many acres seeded due to excess moisture; therefore, harvest was very brief. Most producers in all the other regions are claiming average to above-average yields and good quality.

Producers in the northern regions were able to get a jump start on seeding. By May 16, the northwest was 41 per cent seeded. On the other hand, producers in the northeast were dealing with wet soils which delayed the start of seeding. However, clear weather during most of the seeding period allowed northwestern producers to get 62 per cent of the crop seeded by May 23. 

Seeding got off to an unpromising start for producers in the southern and east-central regions. The ground was already very wet from the moisture received in 2010. Heavy snowfall and runoff compounded the situation even more. Many areas of southern and east-central Saskatchewan had both ‘very high' and ‘well above normal' runoff potential (Saskatchewan Watershed Authority, April 1, 2011). On the east side of the province, the affected area stretched from Hudson Bay in the north to Roche Percee in the south. As the spring runoff commenced, rivers, creeks and ditches filled with water. Roads were washed out and many fields were inaccessible or flooded. The early spring weather co-operated somewhat, as temperatures were slow to rise; however, because soils were saturated and there was a lot of water to move, many areas were flooded out.

On April 30, a snow storm passed through the southeastern and east-central regions, dropping over 45 cm of wet snow. Cattle producers reported losing significant numbers of calves and cows in this storm.

There were a few days at the beginning of May in which some producers were able to get out and mud the crop in. The rain started shortly thereafter in the south and east, and did not quit. From May 22 to June 20, many areas received over 200 per cent of average precipitation (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2011). By this time, many areas were reporting over 350 mm of cumulative precipitation since April 1.

As of June 20, 82 per cent of the 2011 crop had been seeded. The southeast reported 44 per cent seeded, the southwest 82 per cent, the east-central 86 per cent, the northeast 98 per cent, and the west-central and northwest 99 per cent. In the southeast, seeding progress ranged from five to 90 per cent, depending on the area.

June 20 was the day of the big rain that covered most of the province. Most areas received more than 40 mm and some areas reported more than 85 mm (the southeast, east-central and many areas in the north). The rain flooded crops in the Meadow Lake area, which received another four to seven inches the week after, causing severe flooding damage to crops and roads.

Spring crop damage was mostly attributed to flooding and frost. The northern regions reported -1C to -5C for a couple nights during the week of May 17 to 23.

According to the Crop Report records, the Stockholm area had the largest amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the province since April 1 -- 617 mm. The Bengough area came in second at 609 mm and Ceylon was third with 575 mm. The least amount of cumulative rainfall for the province was recorded around the Lake Lenore area (149 mm). The Maple Creek area recorded 174 mm. The Dorintosh area set the record for (not sure if this is a record overall, so we should just attribute it to this year only) month-over-month rainfall in 2011 -- 311 mm in June.

As of June 23, 6.2 million acres (18 per cent) of the possible 34.2 million seed-able acres remained unseeded. Of the acres that were seeded, eight per cent (2.2 million acres) were subsequently flooded and unlikely to produce a crop. 

Most regions received adequate rain throughout July and August. The provincial hay crop yielded well and quality was generally good to excellent. Hay land and pasture that did not get flooded grew exceptionally large amounts of forage. Areas in the northwest had an extended haying season due to rain in July and late spring frosts that set the hay crop back somewhat. The provincial average yield on dryland brome/alfalfa hay was 1.84 tons per acre (range 2.08 tons per acre to 1.36 tons per acre), above the 10-year average of 1.1 tons per acre.

There were a couple of weeks of warm temperatures which helped mature the crop. By mid-August, harvest was rolling in the southern and central regions. There was rain during the third week in August and the first part of September. After that, harvest weather was clear, warm and sunny until October 10. Temperatures were over 30C for a number of days, allowing crops to be binned dry. By September 19, 76 per cent of the 2011 harvest was complete, well ahead of the five-year average of 61 per cent.  The greatest week-over-week harvest progress was made September 6 to 12 -- a 28-per-cent increase over the previous week. The majority of the harvest was done by September 26, when 91 per cent of the crop had been combined.

The first fall frost was September 13. Temperatures ranged from -2C to -7C. Late-seeded crops were damaged the most. Crop damage for the year was mostly attributed to wet conditions, frost and hail. Most insect populations were low and so did minimal crop damage. The two exceptions were pea aphids on peas and lentils in the southern regions and wheat midge in areas in the north. Bertha armyworms caused some damage in canola in a few areas in the north. Grasshoppers were causing some damage on emerging winter wheat in the south. Sclerotinia in canola and stripe rust and leaf diseases in cereals caused some crop damage. Many producers in the wet south were applying control measures for cereal leaf diseases, where typically hot and dry weather tends to stall the disease out. Ergot was causing grade loss in cereals at harvest time. Some grain buyers have purchased colour sorters to try to clean some of the ergot out of the otherwise good quality grain. 

Crop quality is estimated to be above the 10-year average, while crop yields are estimated to be equal to or above the 10-year average. The percentage falling into the top grade category is above the 10-year average in over half of the crops. Downgrading came from hail, frost, ergot, and wheat midge. The spring wheat crop is estimated to be 54 per cent 1 CW and 26 per cent 2 CW. The durum crop is expected to be 46 per cent 1 CW and 30 per cent 2 CW. Thirty-one per cent of the oat crop is expected to grade 1 CW and 49 per cent 2 CW. Forty-three per cent of the barley is estimated to go for malt and 46 per cent will grade 1 CW. Sixty-two per cent of the fall rye crop will fall into the top grade and 29 per cent will grade 2 CW.

Eighty-four per cent of the flax is anticipated to grade 1 CW. The mustard crop is expected to grade 83 per cent 1 CAN and 15 per cent 2 CAN.  Eighty-two and 13 per cent of the canola is estimated to grade 1 CAN and 2 CAN, respectively. 

Forty-one per cent of the lentil crop is projected to grade 1 CAN and 47 per cent is estimated to grade 2 CAN. Forty per cent of the peas are expected to grade 1 CAN and 52 per cent will grade 2 CAN. The chickpea crop is expected to grade 53 per cent in the top category and 41 per cent is predicted to be 2 CW.

It is a different situation in most areas of the province this fall compared to last year. This year, many areas are reporting shortages of topsoil moisture going into the winter. This is compared to last year when many areas were reporting an abundance of topsoil moisture going into the winter. If the upcoming winter only brings average amounts of snowfall to the south, producers are indicating there will be many acres not seeded again next year.


Crop Report, as of October 10, 2011

All regions of the province, with the exception of the northwest, have 99 per cent of harvest completed. The northwestern region is reporting 97 per cent complete. Crop reporters have indicated that most of the crop still out in the field is either canola waiting for green seed to clear or some later seeded crops. Weeks of warm and clear weather allowed grain crops to be harvested in good quality. Ergot has affected quality of wheat and durum in some areas of the province. Most producers are busy hauling grain, cleaning corrals, controlling weeds and putting machinery away for the winter. There has been no record of snow to date.


Southeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 1, 2, and 3ASE)

Almost all crops are harvested in the area with the exception of 13 per cent of the flax and the odd canola and spring wheat field. Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. Areas that received excess moisture in the spring had disappointing yields for the most part. Many acres did not get seeded, and therefore the unseeded acres were not calculated as part of the regional average yields. Areas in the western parts of the region reported average to above average yields. Regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 37 bu/ac; spring wheat 28 bu/ac; durum 31 bu/ac; oats 50 bu/ac; barley 43 bu/ac; fall rye 42 bu/ac; flax 17 bu/ac; canola 23 bu/ac; mustard 860 lb./ac; lentils 1,000 lb./ac; peas 28 bu/ac and canaryseed 960 lb./ac. Lentil and canola yields varied across the region and were most affected by the spring moisture conditions. 

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as 15 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and six per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as eight per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and one per cent very short. In crop districts (CD) 1B and 2A, 28 and 29 per cent of the crop land has surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated increases of 74 and 14 per cent, respectively, in winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year. This is due largely to the wet fall conditions and wet harvest in 2010 that were not conducive to fall seeding as well as to the large number of acres that were left unseeded this spring.

Average dryland hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): Alfalfa 2.0; alfalfa/brome 2.1; other tame hay 1.8; native 1.5 and green feed 2.0. Ninety-eight per cent of cattle producers have more-than-adequate hay supplies for the winter, but there is concern over straw supplies since many acres were not seeded this spring. Some producers will use surplus hay to fulfill their straw need.

Rain toward the end of the week brought between 12 and 55 mm of rain. The Carnduff area received 16 mm, the Kisbey area 32 mm, the Moosomin area 25 mm, the Whitewood area 28 mm, the Pangman area 50 mm, the Pense area 44 mm, the Marquis area 23 mm, the Radville area 18 mm and the Ceylon area 55 mm. Although the year started out very wet, the topsoil was drying out as many areas had not had significant rainfall since July. According to the Crop Report records, the Bengough area has the most amount of cumulative rainfall recorded in the region since April 1 -- 609 mm. The Ceylon area came in second at 575 mm, and the third highest was the Moosomin area with 550 mm. The Moose Jaw area had the least amount of cumulative rainfall for the region -- 240 mm.

Producers are starting to bring cattle home from pastures. Farmers are busy controlling weeds, hauling bales and putting machinery away. Some areas are still very wet and some roads are still under water. Most producers are hoping for a winter with little snow as spring runoff will be a problem in the already wet soils.


Southwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 3ASW, 3AN, 3B and 4) 

Seventeen per cent of the flax crop and a few fields of oats and barley have yet to be combined.  Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. Yields tend to be higher in the western and northern parts of the region, which were not affected by excess moisture. Many acres did not get seeded and therefore were not included in the average yield calculations. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 41 bu/ac; spring wheat 32 bu/ac; durum 36 bu/ac; oats 55 bu/ac; barley 51 bu/ac; fall rye 39 bu/ac; flax 19 bu/ac; canola 31 bu/ac; mustard 980 lb./ac; lentils 1,400 lb./ac; peas 32 bu/ac; canaryseed 1,000 lb./ac; and chickpeas 1,100 lb./ac. 

Going into winter, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as two per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and six per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and 12 per cent very short. In CDs 3BS and 3BN, respectively, 69 and 43 per cent of cropland are short of topsoil moisture. Seventy-three per cent of crop land in CD 4B is short of topsoil moisture. The numbers are very similar for hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions in these three crop districts.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated decreases of seven and four per cent, respectively, in the number of winter wheat and fall rye acres compared to last year.

Average hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.1; brome/alfalfa 2.0; other tame hay 1.7; native 1.3 and green feed 2.5. Yields on irrigated stands are as follows: alfalfa 2.7 and brome/alfalfa 2.5.  All livestock producers have adequate to surplus supplies of hay, green feed and feed grain for the winter. Six per cent of livestock producers have reported they will have some straw shortages due to the limited number of acres that were seeded. Hay quality is very good.

A weather system moved up from the south, dropping up to 49 mm of rain in some areas. The Big Beaver area had 41 mm, the Assiniboia area 49 mm, the Spring Valley area 33 mm, the Eyebrow area 19 mm, the Shaunavon area 23 mm, the Blumenhof area 25 mm, the Rush Lake area 45 mm, the Maple Creek area 30 mm and the Gull Lake area 10 mm. The Big Beaver area had the record for the most cumulative rainfall in the region -- 571 mm.

The lowest cumulative rainfall for the region was reported in the Maple Creek area -- 174 mm.

The southern part of the region received excess moisture in the spring, but then very little rain fell for most of the summer and fall. Yields were reduced due to the short root systems of many crops. The recent rain filled a lot of the sloughs that were starting to dry up. There are roads still under water in some areas. Many fields were seeded and then flooded out by the significant rain that fell during seeding. The northern and western parts of the region were less affected by moisture and many producers are reporting good yields and grades.


East-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 5 and 6A)

Three per cent of the flax crop and a few fields of wheat and oats are still left to combine. Crop reporters are indicating crop yields are quite variable across the region. Areas in the eastern part of the region had a tough time seeding in the spring due to the excess moisture. Fortunately, not a lot of rain fell during the summer and fall months, so those producers who did get the crop in were quite satisfied with the results. There were areas in the region that got seeded, but were subsequently flooded out by the rain in June. The eastern part of the region had a few hail storms during the summer which affected crop yields. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 43 bu/ac; spring wheat 37 bu/ac; durum 36 bu/ac; oats 78 bu/ac; barley 57 bu/ac; fall rye 31 bu/ac; flax 23 bu/ac; canola 31 bu/ac; mustard 1,000 lb./ac; lentils 1,400 lb./ac; peas 35 bu/ac and canaryseed 1,100 lb./ac. Quality is generally good. Ergot is causing some downgrading in wheat and durum.

Cropland topsoil moisture conditions going into the winter are rated as three per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and three per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, 13 per cent short and four per cent very short. In CD 6A, 24 per cent of the cropland and 30 per cent of the hay land and pasture are short of topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a 16-per-cent increase in the number of acres seeded to winter wheat over last year.  Many of these acres were too wet to seed this past spring. There is a two-per-cent decrease in the number of acres seeded to fall rye over last year. 

Average hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): Alfalfa and brome/alfalfa 2.1; other tame hay 1.6; native 1.5 and green feed 2.4.  All livestock producers are indicating they have adequate to surplus hay supplies for the winter. Four per cent of the crop reporters are commenting on shortages of straw for the winter. Hay varies in quality within the region, but for the most part was put up in good condition.

Rain was reported for most areas late in the week. The Stockholm area received 25 mm, the Kelliher area 22 mm, the Raymore area 8 mm, the Kamsack area 30 mm, the Sturgis area 35 mm, the Quill Lake area 14 mm, the Chamberlain area 18 mm, the Bethune area 23 mm and the Bradwell area 37 mm. The Stockholm area had the highest cumulative rainfall for the region -- 617 mm. The least amount of cumulative rain for the region was reported in the Allan area -- 164 mm.

Producers in the east of the region are hoping for a winter with little snow since many of the sloughs are full and some land is still underwater. However, those producers on the west side are hoping for snow to recharge the water table. The drier summer harvest weather helped to relieve some of the pressures from the wet spring.  Farmers are busy controlling weeds, hauling bales and getting ready for fall fertilizer applications.


West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B and 7)

Five per cent of the oats, two per cent of the flax and a few fields of wheat are still left to combine. Yields in the region are average to above average. There was adequate topsoil moisture in the spring to start the crops off well. A couple of thunderstorms rolled through the region during the growing season, which helped the crops fill but also dropped some hail that caused significant damage in some areas. The harvest weather was warm and dry, allowing for good quality grain, oilseeds and pulses. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 53 bu/ac; spring wheat 38 bu/ac; durum 40 bu/ac; oats 67 bu/ac; barley 59 bu/ac; fall rye 25 bu/ac; flax 25 bu/ac; canola 34 bu/ac; mustard 1,200 lb./ac; lentils 1,500 lb,/ac; peas 39 bu/ac and canaryseed 1,200 lb./ac. Ergot is causing downgrading of durum and wheat.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 39 per cent adequate, 50 per cent short and 10 per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 41 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. In CD 7A, 77 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture are short of topsoil moisture. In CD 7B, 23 per cent of the cropland and 27 per cent of the hay land and pasture are very short of topsoil. 

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a six-per-cent increase in the acres seeded to winter wheat over last year. There is a four-per-cent decrease in the acres seeded to fall rye over last year. 

Average dry land hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.0; brome/alfalfa 1.8; other tame hay 1.6; native 1.2 and green feed 2.3. Average irrigated hay yields in CD 6B are as follows (in tons per ac): alfalfa 3.1; brome/alfalfa 3.2; greenfeed 4.2.  All livestock producers are reporting adequate to surplus hay supplies for the winter. Hay quality is generally good.

The recent rain was welcomed as the topsoil was dry, although some areas received less rain than was needed. . The Hanley area received 30 mm, the Langham area 47 mm, the Kindersley area 9 mm, the Biggar area 15 mm, the Sonningdale area 19 mm and the Battleford area 4 mm. The Dinsmore area had the highest cumulative rainfall -- 396 mm. The Hanley and Scott areas had the lowest cumulative rainfall -- 183 mm.

Farmers are busy controlling weeds, hauling bales, fixing fences, bringing the cattle home for the winter and monitoring grain in storage that was binned during hot harvest days.


Northeastern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 8 and 9AE)

Thirteen per cent of the flax, two per cent of the oats and one per cent of the canola has yet to be combined. The region had surplus  topsoil moisture last fall, and the spring was fairly wet. Despite this, the northern regions were consistently ahead of the rest of the province in seeding progress because there was very little rainfall. By May 23, 62 per cent of the crop had been seeded.  A significant amount of rain fell during the first week of May and the next substantial rain (10 to 20 mm) came the first week in June. The region had adequate rain throughout July and August. By the time harvest started, the weather had turned hot and dry, allowing many producers to put the grain in the bin in good shape with average to above-average yields. The regional average crop yields are as follows: winter wheat 42 bu/ac; spring wheat 41 bu/ac; oats 89 bu/ac; barley 63 bu/ac; fall rye 33 bu/ac; flax 23 bu/ac; canola 33 bu/ac; peas 36 bu/ac; and canaryseed 1,300 lb./ac.

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are 76 per cent adequate and 24 per cent short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated 61 per cent adequate and 39 per cent short. In CD 8A, 39 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is short of topsoil moisture. Last year at this time, this CD was reporting 88 per cent of the cropland had surplus topsoil moisture.

Crop reporters in the region have estimated a 19-per-cent decrease in the acres seeded to winter wheat over last year. Most of the region's farmland was seeded to spring crops, unlike the previous year when some acres that were too wet to seed in the spring were seeded to fall cereals.

Average hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 2.1; brome/alfalfa 1.5; other tame hay 1.3; native 1.6 and green feed 2.4. Hay quality is generally good, although quality has been reduced in some areas due to the July rains. All livestock producers are reporting adequate to surplus hay, greenfeed and straw supplies for the winter.

Between 4 and 44 mm of rain fell on the region during the week of Oct. 3. CD 8A appreciated the moisture as conditions were fairly dry. The Porcupine Plain area received 4 mm, the Star City area 35 mm, the Nipawin area 23 mm, the Vonda area 44 mm, the Kinistino area 30 mm, the Prince Albert area 34 and the Garrick area 20 mm. The Garrick area had the highest cumulative rainfall for the region -- 379 mm. The lowest cumulative rainfall was in the Lake Lenore area -- 149 mm.

Producers are busy baling straw, hauling bales, hauling cattle home from pasture and getting ready for fall fertilizer applications.


Northwestern Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 9AW and 9B)

Seven per cent of the canola, two per cent of the oats and a few fields of spring wheat are left to combine. The uncombined canola is lying in the swath waiting for the green seed to clear.

Topsoil moisture going into seeding was adequate. Seeding progressed well in the region, with very few rain interruptions. By early June, many reporters were indicating that it was very dry and some crops had patchy emergence. By May 23, 79 per cent of the crop was seeded, ahead of all other regions. Then, the region was hit with a couple spring frosts that set back some crops and alfalfa fields. During the week of June 20, large amounts of rain resulted in some localized flooding of crops and roads. Most areas received over 50 mm, and the Glaslyn and Meadow Lake areas received126 and 167 mm. Some of the flooded areas recovered and produced good yields. The region had adequate rain throughout July and August. Harvest weather was warm and dry. Topsoil is very dry in some areas.

The regional average crop yields are as follows: spring wheat 40 bu/ac; oats 90 bu/ac; barley 65 bu/ac; fall rye 35 bu/ac; flax 22 bu/ac; canola 34 bu/ac and peas 37 bu/ac. 

Going into winter, cropland topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 37 per cent adequate, 55 per cent short and eight per cent very short. On hay land and pasture, topsoil moisture is rated as 30 per cent adequate, 55 per cent short and 15 per cent very short.

Average hay yields for the region are as follows (in tons per acre): alfalfa 1.5; brome/alfalfa 1.4; other tame hay 1.2; native 1.0 and green feed 2.0. All cattle producers are reporting adequate to surplus hay, straw and greenfeed supplies for the winter. Hay quality varies within the region. Some hay swaths were caught in the July and August rains, resulting in reduced quality.

Rain was reported in CD 9AW, however CD 9B received very little if any precipitation. The Radisson area reported 12 mm, the Hafford area 20 mm, the Duck Lake area 40 mm and the Rabbit Lake and Turtleford areas 3 mm. The region's highest cumulative rainfall was recorded in the Dorintosh area -- 564 mm. The lowest cumulative rainfall was recorded in the North Battleford area -- 177 mm.


 

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