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       Sunday, October 22, 2017

SCIC Crop Report - Final 2007
November 15 is the deadline to:
File all Production Declarations. Note: Production information must be filed before you can register any yield-loss claims.
Submit yield-loss claims on harvested cereal, oilseed, pulse and potato crops.
Request any extensions of insurance on unharvested acres (excluding potatoes).
Remember, any claims submitted between November 16 and December 31 will have indemnities reduced by 25 per cent.  Claims will not be accepted after December 31.
If you have any questions, contact your Crop Insurance customer service office.  Our toll-free number is 1-888-935-0000.

 One Year Ago
Over 500 000 acres remained to be harvested from the 2006 crop. 
Crop reporters expected that production would be 24.96 million tonnes. 
Quality of the 2006 crop was above average.   
Alfalfa/brome on dry land averaged 1.6 imperial tons per acre

Final Crop Report, 2007

The harvest of 2007 got off to an early start for many Saskatchewan farmers, but is still continuing for some, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food's final crop report for the year.  

For some farmers in central and northern regions, spring started with harvesting the 2006 crop left out last fall.  Approximately 200,000 acres were left to harvest, and about 70,000 acres were harvested.  The remainder was not worth combining due to weathering and animal damage. 

Seeding activity in the province began during the third week in April in the southwest, southeast, and west central areas.  By the end of May, 80% of the crop was seeded.  By mid-June, a number of rural municipalities in the north eastern and east central areas of Saskatchewan reported 75% or less of their crop had been seeded, due to very wet field conditions. 

Farmers seeded an estimated 33.1 million acres.  Hot, dry weather in July and August put the brakes on a great looking crop and pushed crop development ahead.

Harvest started in late July in some areas of the province, and close to 40% was complete by the end of August.  Wet conditions prolonged harvest in the east central and northern areas of the province.  As of the date of this crop report, there are at least 700,000 acres yet to be harvested, the majority of that in the northeast. 

Crop reporters expect that farmers will harvest 23.87 million tonnes of the major grains, oilseeds, and specialty crops for the 2007 crop year.  The production estimate is less than 1% above the 10-year (1997-2006) average of 23.83 million tonnes, and 1% above 2006 production of 23.75 million tonnes.     

The percentage of crops falling into the top grade category is above the 10-year average in about half of the crops.  Downgrading came from insects, hail, low bushel weight, and weathering in late-harvested crops.

The hay crop was generally good this year - provincially the first and second cuts of brome/alfalfa hay on dry land averaged 1.5 tons per acre, above the 10-year average of 1.1 tons per acre.  Quality was expected to be generally good to excellent.  The lowest yields were reported in the southwest due to dry spring soils. 

Thank you to our crop reporters for their reports for another season -you make the report the valuable commodity that it is.


Precipitation/Moisture

According to Saskatchewan Watershed Authority's April, 2007 report, winter precipitation totals in the grainbelt region generally varied from below normal in west-central areas to  well above normal in central and northern areas. 

Mild and record high temperatures during March melted much of the snow-pack in areas south of a line extending from Yorkton, to just north of Saskatoon and then across to Lloydminster.  By the end of April, the 2007 spring runoff was into recession throughout the grainbelt region of the province.  Some areas in the northern grainbelt experienced flooding due to a high runoff during the spring of 2006 followed by an extremely wet fall and another high runoff this spring. 

Precipitation during April was quite variable throughout the province.  South western areas received well above normal precipitation while northern grainbelt areas received well below normal precipitation.

Precipitation during May was also quite variable across the province.  Eastern and northern grainbelt areas received well above normal precipitation while south western areas (excluding the Cypress Hills area) generally received below normal precipitation.  The highest rainfall amounts were recorded across eastern areas, where totals ranged from 65 mm to 130 mm during the last ten days of the month.  The excessive rainfall on the wet soils generated significant runoff in north eastern areas.    

During June, northern, eastern and west central areas recorded well above normal precipitation.  Heavier rains created additional runoff in some areas as well as flooding of low lying agricultural areas.

The primary source of precipitation during July and August was thunderstorm activity, and, as such, rainfall amounts varied locally as well as regionally.  In July, southern and western grainbelt areas recorded well below normal precipitation and east central areas recorded below normal precipitation.  During August, north central areas recorded above normal precipitation while southern areas recorded well below normal precipitation.       

September precipitation continued to be variable.  South eastern and west central areas recorded well below normal precipitation while northern areas received well above normal precipitation. 

During the growing season (April 1 to July 31), precipitation as a percentage of normal varied from lows of 55% in the Swift Current (CD 3bn) and Last Mountain (CD 6a) areas, 62% in the Maple Creek area (CD 4a), and 77% in the Val Marie area (CD 3bs) to highs of 221% in the Coronach area (CD 3asw), 185% in the Aberdeen area (CD 8b), and 141% in the Hudson Bay area (CD 8a). 

Seeding

In the fall of 2006, slightly less than 1% of the crop had not been harvested due to poor weather conditions, the majority in northern regions.  About one-third of that was combined in the spring, the rest being damaged by weathering and wildlife.

Seeding activity in the province began during the third week in April in the southwest, southeast, and west central areas.  By the end of April, 2% of the 2007 crop had been planted.  By mid-May, about 35% of the crop had been planted.  Cool temperatures, dry soil conditions in the south and very wet soil conditions in the north delayed seeding progress.  By the end of May, 80% of the crop was seeded.  By June 10, the provincial seeding progress total was at 96%.  Individual crop districts less than 90% completed included CDs 5b and 8.  A number of rural municipalities in the north eastern and east central areas of Saskatchewan reported 75% or less of their crop had been seeded.

Wet and windy weather made spraying challenging for farmers.  


Crop Damage

Throughout the growing season, sources of weather damage were wind, heat and drought stress, frost, flooding, and hail.  Results of these conditions were lodging, shelling, sprouting, bleaching, staining, scattering of swaths, reduced yields, and reduced bushel weights.  A hot, dry July was the most damaging event for crops in 2007.  Most crops looked very promising into early July.  Then the rains stopped and the temperatures soared.  Hail and frost also robbed farmers of yields.  Some reporters indicated the frustration of having crops drowned and burnt all in the same year.    

From entomologist, Scott Hartley

Although there were some warmer periods in April, overall temperatures were cool during May and June of 2007.   This resulted in a slower progression of insect development including hatching from eggs, emergence from over-wintering sites, and pupae.  The cool start to the 2007 growing season reduced insect pressure.  Actual early season insect infestations of economic importance included cutworms (southern), cabbage seedpod weevil southwest (SW) and pea leaf weevil SW, a new pest in Saskatchewan.  As the season progressed, diamondback moth, wheat midge and bertha armyworm were the most widespread crop pests.

Cereal Insects: 

Grasshoppers - The 2007 grasshopper risk map for Saskatchewan indicated low levels of grasshoppers with a few light (>2 - 4 hoppers /m2) areas in southern regions indicating an increase from the low risk levels of the previous few years.  The hot, dry conditions of July were favourable for grasshopper development but the cool, wet August was less than ideal. 

A 2008 Saskatchewan grasshopper risk map will be generated from data collected in a fall survey of adult grasshopper populations.  Preliminary results suggest the risk will be low for 2008 but with increased risk in some areas, especially for producers growing more vulnerable crops such as lentils in southern regions.

Wireworms - A wireworm survey of Canada was initiated by Dr. Vernon (AAFC - Agriculture and AgriFood Canada).  Saskatchewan samples were to be submitted to AAFC for identification.  The survey was publicized through extension meetings and publications such as the Crop Production Newsletter.  Due to the diversification of crops in Saskatchewan, the information from this survey could be advantageous in understanding wireworm species and plant host relationships for future management decisions.

Wheat stem sawfly - Wheat stem sawfly adults were reported in wheat fields across the province in late June and early July.  Actual levels of infestation are not known but the inquiries regarding wheat stem sawfly were reduced in 2007 compared to previous years.   

Russian wheat aphid - The Russian wheat aphid was first found in southwest Saskatchewan in the late 1980's but levels have remained low and the pest does not appear to have extended its range out of the southwest. 

Wheat midge - The 2007 Wheat Midge Forecast indicated a large area of high risk for wheat producers across Saskatchewan throughout the moist dark brown and black soil zones.  Other areas on the forecast map indicating lower risk were also affected by economic levels of the midge.

A fall wheat midge survey is being conducted to provide an estimate of populations and risk for 2008.  This is a soil survey from which midge cocoons and "free" larvae are extracted and examined to determine parasitism levels.  Total numbers of viable midge will be used to produce a risk map.

Oilseed Insects: 

Crucifer flea beetle - The cool, wet spring was not favourable for flea beetles in most areas.  However in the southeast, there were reports from Canola Council of Canada agronomists of economic levels of flea beetles.

Cutworms - (most common species - redbacked cutworm, pale western cutworm, dingy cutworm and army cutworm) - Severe infestations of cutworms were the most significant insect problem facing producers in the spring of 2007.  Extensive damage to crops, in many cases canola, was reported by Saskatchewan Crop Insurance and industry agrologists across the southern and central regions of the province.

As noted in the past few seasons, the areas of fields affected by cutworms were relatively large. A report from northwest of Regina estimated that 50% of a 190 acre field of canola was destroyed with plants cut and most of the above ground plant growth consumed or completely absent.  Similar reports were received from northeast of Regina in the Lipton area and in southwest Saskatchewan.

Diamondback moth - Diamondback moth larvae were reported in southeast Saskatchewan (in the Fairlight area (RM 91), Redvers, Carlyle, Oxbow) and in the southwest (reported by Canola Council agronomists).  Ultimately, infestations were reported across southern Saskatchewan and in pockets throughout the rest of the province.

Bertha armyworm (BAW) - Due to the interest in the BAW monitoring program in 2007, about 300 sites with pheromone traps were set up by individual co-operators and industry agrologists in Saskatchewan.  The cool temperatures in the spring resulted in a slow emergence of BAW moths until late June, at least one week later than in 2006.

Cabbage seedpod weevil - Canola and mustard crops in southwest Saskatchewan were infested with high populations of cabbage seedpod weevil.  This insect first appeared in the southwest in 2000 but not in any significant numbers.  Since then the population levels have fluctuated and the weevil has gradually extended its range to the north and east.  In 2006 there were extensive economic populations requiring chemical control for the first time in this province.  Spraying for the weevil increased in 2007 with high populations found in the Swift Current area.

Other Crops: 

Canaryseed - Aphids - High aphid populations were observed during field scouting in a number of field crops in July.  However the high temperatures in July resulted in rapid advancement of the canaryseed crops and reduced the period of susceptibility to aphid feeding.

Dry Pea (2007) - The pea leaf weevil, a new insect pest of pea crops, was reported in Saskatchewan in late May, 2007.  After affecting producers in southern Alberta since 2001, damage to peas has extended into southwest Saskatchewan this spring.  Although the actual beetles have not been found, the distinctive damage has been observed in some pea crops and samples submitted to the Crop Protection Laboratory from the Maple Creek area.

The only other insects that cause similar damage to crops (notching of the leaf edges) are grasshoppers and the sweet clover weevil. The sweet clover weevil's preferred plant host is clover. Grasshoppers, if present, are generally evident during the day. In addition, even though grasshoppers will feed on a variety of crops, pea is not greatly preferred if other food options are available. As noted in the 2007 Grasshopper Forecast, populations are at relatively low levels across the province.

Alfalfa - alfalfa weevil -There were reports of alfalfa weevil causing damage to alfalfa stands in eastern and particularly, southeast Saskatchewan in July.  Formerly restricted to south of the #1 Highway, this weevil has been gradually extending its range northward and can now be found north of the Qu'Appelle Valley. 

Red Clover - lesser clover leaf weevil - Red clover growers in north eastern Saskatchewan were again noting seed reductions due to the lesser clover leaf weevil. Populations appear to be increasing in area and impact.

Potential new insect pests - cereal leaf beetle and Swede midge - The presence of cereal leaf beetle in Alberta, Montana and North Dakota and recent surveys suggest that the insect is continuing to expand its distribution in the Canadian Prairies.  Surveys in Alberta have shown the beetle to be near the Saskatchewan border. 

Gophers, or Richardson's ground squirrels, were again a huge problem in the southwest and damaged a lot of crop.  Phostoxin was registered as a control.    


 

From plant pathologist, Penny Pearse:  The 2007 year was not considered significant for most crop diseases.  Although May and June weather conditions were ideal for crop development and early diseases were reported in cereals and chickpea, the hot and dry weather in July and August greatly reduced disease development. 

Ascochyta blight in chickpea was reported early and fungicide applications began the first week of June; however, disease was manageable in 2007 and mostly low levels developed.  There were very few disease reports on other pulse crops.

Diseases of cereals included tanspot, leaf rust, and stripe rust but few fields were treated with fungicide as disease pressure lessened in July.  There were reports of prematurity blight in cereals caused by a combination of root disease and hot, dry soils.  Fusarium head blight was low in both barley and wheat in 2007.  Crown and stem rust were also reported in oat crops. 

In canola, aster yellows was the most commonly reported disease and was present throughout the province.  Sclerotinia white mould developed in late-maturing canola crops in the more northern regions.

Harvest/Production

Harvest operations got underway in late July with less than 1% of the 2007 crop reported to be harvested by July 29th.  The largest week over week harvesting progress occurred between August 26 and September 2 at 17%.  Harvest progress was slow as the crop moved from 4% harvested by August 5 to 96% harvested by October 14.     

Over 700 000 acres remain to be harvested from the 2006 crop, primarily in the northeast.  Farmers continue to combine when they can, and grain dryers are being well-used.  Some crop may not get taken off this fall.         

Saskatchewan farmers are expected to harvest 23.87 million tonnes of the major grains, oilseeds, and specialty crops for the 2007 crop year.  The production estimate is less than 1% above the 10-year (1997-2006) average of 23.83 million tonnes, and is 1% above 2006 production of 23.75 million tonnes.      

On a provincial basis, yield estimates are expected to be above average the 10-year average for winter wheat, oats, fall rye, flax, canola, peas, mustard, lentils, and canary seed.  The north eastern area of the grainbelt reported the highest average yields for oats, triticale, mustard, and canary seed.  The north western area of the grainbelt reported the highest average yields for spring wheat, barley, flax, and canola.  The south western area reported the lowest average yields for all crops except durum, fall rye, triticale, and chickpeas.

Given the way the crops looked in most areas in early July, many farmers are disappointed with the yields they ultimately got.  There were some positive surprises at harvest time, but not very many.

Quality

The percentage of crops falling into the top grade category is above the 10-year average in about half of the crops.  Downgrading came from insects, hail, low bushel weight, and weathering in late-harvested crops.  

The spring wheat crop is estimated to be 37% 1 Canada Western (CW), compared to 50% 1 CW for the 10-year (1997-2006) average.  The overall quality of the durum crop is expected to be 46% 1 CW for 2007, compared to 41% for the 10-year average. 

Twenty-two per cent of the oat crop is expected to grade 1 CW, compared to the 10-year average of 28%.  Malting barley grade for the 2007 crop is expected to be above the 10-year average - 43% versus 31%.  Eighty-three per cent of the triticale crop is expected to grade 1 Canada.  There is no 10-year crop report average for triticale.

Eighty-nine per cent of the flax crop is expected to grade 1 CW, above the 10-year average of 80%.  Canola is also above average - 80% for the 2006 crop versus the 10-year average of 76%.

The mustard crop is expected to grade 73% 1 Canada versus the 10-year average of 74%.  With 30% of the sunflowers combined, 44% of that crop is expected to grade 1 Canada, compared to 67% for the 10-year average.  The lentil crop is expected to grade 89% in the top two grades, compared to the 10-year average of 74%.  The pea crop is expected to grade 94% in the top two grades, compared to the 10-year average of 82%.  The chickpea crop is expected to grade 64% 1 CW.  There is no 10-year average for chickpeas.

The quality of fall seeded crops was estimated to be above-average.  The rye crop was expected to grade 95% in the top two grades versus the 10-year average of 88%.  Winter wheat crops were expected to grade 63% 1 CW versus 49% for the 10-year average.

More of the lower grading crops were harvested in the northern and central areas of the grainbelt.  More of the higher grading crops were harvested in the southern grainbelt.


 

Hay/Pasture and Winter Feed

Cutting of the 2007 hay crop began in mid-June.  By mid-July, over 40% of the first-cut had been baled or put into silage.  At the end of July, 83% of the first cut and less than 1% of the second cut had been harvested.  By mid-August, 94% of the first cut and 18% of the second cut were complete.  Many reporters did not expect a second cut of hay in their district.   

Across the province, the first and second cuts of brome/alfalfa hay on dryland averaged 1.53 imperial tons per acre, above the 10-year average of 1.07 imperial tons per acre.  Yields were above the provincial average in all regions, ranging from an average high of 1.79 imperial tons per acre in the northeast to an average low of 1.26 imperial tons per acre in the southwest.

Pastures were slow to develop as dry conditions in the south and cool weather and very wet conditions on the eastern side and into the northwest hampered growth.  Pasture condition ratings at the end of May showed over 80% of the reporters rating pastures in their area in good to excellent condition.  By the end of June, pasture conditions had improved even more and 95% were reported to be in good to excellent condition.  Conditions declined significantly by the end of July, with 56% of reporters giving the good to excellent rating.  By the end of August, 47% of reporters were giving a good to excellent rating.  The decline continued into September with 29% of reporters rated pastures in good to excellent condition at the end of September.  Pastures held out better in central and northern areas. 

Water supplies for livestock is a concern for many southern producers going into the winter as sloughs and dugouts are dry or very low.  Many are looking for a heavy snowfall to replenish water basins in the spring run-off.  Some farmers have been hauling water for livestock for several weeks already.     

Winter feed supplies are rated as adequate to surplus by over 90% of reporters.  The southwest had the highest ratings of inadequate hay, greenfeed, straw, and feed grain. 

Fall-seeded crops

The area seeded to winter wheat in Saskatchewan is estimated to rise to 300 000 acres, an increase of just over 5% from the fall of 2006.  Winter wheat plantings are expected to be up in the southern and central regions.  The largest increase in winter wheat acres is expected in the southeast, while the largest decrease is expected in the northeast. 

Fall rye plantings are expected to decrease to 200 000 acres, down 30% from the fall of 2006.  Fall rye acreages are expected to be up in south, while the largest decrease is expected in the central regions.  Two extremes were responsible for the regional decreases in both crops - either too wet and harvest was not done or too dry.

Moisture

Sixty-one per cent of the crop land is rated as having adequate topsoil moisture, 2% as having surplus, 27% as having short, and 10% as having very short topsoil moisture conditions.  The northeast has the highest rating of surplus topsoil moisture conditions at 5% and the southwest has the highest rating of very short topsoil moisture at 23%.  For hay and pasture land, 56% of the land is rated as adequate, 29% as short, and 15% as very short.  Two per cent of north eastern hay and pasture land is rated as having surplus topsoil moisture, while 38% of south western hay and pasture land is rated as having very short topsoil moisture conditions. 

Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food will be collecting information on subsoil moisture to produce a map for November 1, 2007.

There are over 280 crop reporters around the province who contribute to this report.  Almost 60% of the reporters have been with the program for at least 10 years - and over 20% have been with the program for over 20 years.


 

2007 Saskatchewan Crop Production Estimates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2007

 

1997-2006 Average

 

hvst acres

 

prod'n

 

hvst acres

 

prod'n

 

'000

bu/ac

'000 t

 

'000

bu/ac

'000 t

Winter wheat

 460

37.9

 475

 

142.5

36.2

142.2

Spring wheat

7 390

28.7

5 780

 

9 625.5

29.9

7 830.0

Durum

4 030

26.6

2 920

 

4 497.0

29.8

3 634.8

Oats

2 450

63.5

2 400

 

1 508.0

58.5

1 363.2

Barley

4 130

47.4

4 260

 

4 060.0

48.1

4 256.7

Fall rye

 110

35.8

 100

 

149.0

31.7

 123.6

Triticale

 30

24.5

 20

 

27.5

35.6

24.9

Flax

1 070

18.4

 500

 

1 235.0

18.1

 575.1

Canola

7 050

24.5

3 920

 

5 650.5

23.8

3 096.4

Field peas

2 900

30.4

2 400

 

2 066.0

29.4

1 649.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

29 620

 

22 775

 

28 961.

 

22 696.6

 

 

lb/ac

 

 

 

lb/ac

 

Mustard

 335

 790

 120

 

 489.0

 758

168.8

Lentils

1 315

1 090

 650

 

1 311.0

1 070

 646.3

Canary seed

 405

 925

 170

 

422.5

 877

 167.1

Chickpeas

 375

 941

 160

 

317.8

1 118

154.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

2 430

 

1 100

 

2 540.3

 

1 136.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

32 050

 

23 875

 

31 501.3

 

23 833.1

 

2007 Saskatchewan Dryland Hay Yield Estimates

tons per acre

Alfalfa

Brome/

Other

Wild

Greenfeed

 

Alfalfa

Tame

 

 

  60

1.53

1.39

1.16

1.81

 

2007 Fall Plantings

 

2007

2006

1997-06 Avg.

 

acres

Winter wheat

300 000

285 000

165 500

Fall rye

200 000

285 000

203 500

   
 

2007 Harvested Grains, Oilseeds, and Specialty Crops Grade Estimates

 

per cent

 

 

2007

2006

1997
-06
avg.

2007

2006

1997
-06
avg.

2007

2006

1997
-06
avg.

2007

2006

1997
-06
avg.

Winter wheat

1CW

63

68

49

 

2CW

32

28

33

 

CWFd

5

4

18

 

 

 

 

 

Spring wheat

1CW

37

57

50

 

2CW

38

32

20

 

3CW

18

9

16

 

CWFd

7

2

14

Durum

1CW

46

60

41

 

2CW

38

31

28

 

3CW

14

7

19

 

Oth (4&5)

2

2

12

Oats

1CW

22

32

28

 

2CW

43

47

35

 

3CW

25

16

27

 

4CW

10

5

10

Barley

S.S.&S.

43

47

31

 

1CW

42

44

48

 

2CW&Sa.

15

9

21

 

 

 

 

 

All rye

1CW

68

71

61

 

2CW

27

27

27

 

3CW

5

2

8

 

Sample

0

0

4

Triticale

1Can

83

85

n.a.

 

2Can

16

13

n.a.

 

3Can

1

2

n.a.

 

Sample

0

0

n.a.

Flax

1CW

89

89

80

 

2CW

10

10

13

 

3CW

1

1

4

 

Sample

0

0

3

Canola

1Can

80

88

76

 

2Can

16

10

15

 

3Can

3

2

5

 

Sample

1

0

4

Mustard

1Can

73

84

74

 

2Can

25

15

18

 

3Can

2

1

5

 

4Can&Sa.

0

0

3

Sunflowers

1Can

44

36

67

 

2Can

56

64

29

 

Sample

0

0

4

 

 

 

 

 

Lentils

1Can

45

58

41

 

2Can

44

36

33

 

E3 &3Can

11

6

20

 

Sample

0

0

6

Field peas

1Can

51

54

45

 

2Can

43

38

37

 

E3 &3Can

5

6

12

 

Sample

1

2

6

Chickpeas

1CW

64

67

n.a.

 

2CW

29

25

n.a.

 

3CW

6

5

n.a.

 

Sample

1

3

n.a.



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